GBV

Latin America & the Caribbean Rapid Gender Analysis April 2020

Asylum seekers and migrants traveling through Central America and Mexico to the U.S. border face a range of risks, but women, girls, and other vulnerable groups—such as members of the LGBTQIA community—are confronted with additional threats to their health, safety, and well-being in their countries of origin, countries of transit, and in the U.S. As a result, asylum seekers and migrants who arrive at the U.S.–Mexico border often carry a heavy burden of trauma from experiences with violence. The lack of a system to appropriately support people on the move deepens pre-existing inequalities and exposes already vulnerable groups to additional, unnecessary, risks.

The U.S. Government’s Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), also known as the “Remain in Mexico” policy, returns asylum seekers and migrants from U.S. custody to Mexican territory, compelling them to face months of risk and uncertainty as they wait to complete their asylum processes. The asylum process itself is challenging and unclear, liable to change without warning, and largely opaque to affected populations. The asylum seekers and migrants waiting in Mexico’s Ciudad Juárez city, along the Mexico–U.S. border, face ever-present threats of extortion, gender-based violence (GBV), and kidnappings, which compound their trauma and restrict their freedom of movement and access to critical resources and services. Trauma and fear were the norm of the population that CARE surveyed, not the exception.

Lack of access to complete and reliable information made it difficult for asylum seekers and migrants— including pregnant women and GBV survivors—to make knowledgeable decisions about navigating the asylum process or finding basic services, including health care. Moreover, CARE did not find any mechanisms that allowed asylum seekers and migrants to report concerns or complaints of exploitation and abuse operating at the time of research.

At no point has there been a deliberate effort—by government authorities, policy makers, or those providing the scant services that exist—to systematically assess vulnerabilities and mitigate the risk of harm to at-risk groups. On the contrary, the lack of risk mitigation efforts has allowed several actors to emplace policies that put migrants and asylum seekers at increased risk of harm. For example, asylum seekers and migrants returned from U.S. detention to Mexico are often easily identified by visible markers of their detention, including a lack of shoelaces and the bags that they are issued to carry personal items. This visibility renders asylum seekers and migrants more vulnerable to detention or forced recruitment by armed groups, as well as kidnappings, which at times have taken place on the street directly outside the release area in plain sight of authorities. Read More...

Laos Rapid Gender Analysis COVID-19 July 2020

As of 29 June 2020,10,280,397 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 505,145 deaths have been recorded across 213 territories countries and territories and 2 international conveyances. To date, the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) has confirmed 19 cases, mainly in the Vientiane Capital. The Government of Lao PDR has acted swiftly since the first reported infection to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Since 13 April 2020, no new confirmed cases have been reported.

Although Lao PDR has been able to avoid the worst health impacts of the pandemic, prevention measures such lockdown, closure of schools and businesses, social distancing and travel restrictions, have had significant economic and social impacts across the country. Gender roles, relations and norms within Lao society have influenced the impact of these measures on different genders. Drawing on primary and secondary data, this Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) has found that the pandemic has both reinforced traditional gender norms as well as provided opportunities for men and women to work together to address the current crisis. This reflects broader gender roles and relations in Lao society in which forces of modernization are challenging and changing traditional gender norms. Read More...

CARE Gender Analysis Afghanistan July 2020

Women in Afghanistan face considerable socio-economic, political and power barriers. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the country – decades of conflict, poverty and conservative patriarchal norms limit Afghan women and girls’ freedom of movement, decision-making power and access to health, education, and other basic services and resources. The situation is more dire for women and girls in IDP settlements and contexts. Even though the current Afghan government is publicly committed to women’s rights and empowerment, women continue to face significant gender-based discrimination, bias and violence.

In line with the CARE global strategy, CARE Afghanistan considers gender equality and women empowerment as a primary mission. Promoting a life free from violence and tackling and reducing gender-based violence (GBV) are key strategies for CARE and, with this analysis, CARE Afghanistan intends to explore gender roles and responsibilities and power dynamics within internally displaced person (IDP), returnee and host communities in Herat and Badghis provinces. This research engaged 61 people in key informant and in-depth interviews from Herat and Badghis provinces including community members, community leaders, and representatives from government offices and NGOs. The findings from this analysis intend to contribute to and inform humanitarian, civil society, NGO and government authorities in their programming, policy and overall interventions in the target communities.

This research provides clear evidence that women in the target communities experience considerable levels of domestic violence, perpetrated by close relatives and have extremely low levels of awareness of and capacity to access available GBV support and referral services. 100% of female and 75% of male respondents from Badghis, and 75% of female and 89% of male respondents from Herat agreed that women, boys and girls have experienced violence in their communities. Respondents indicated that the main perpetrators of violence across the two provinces are fathers (33% in Herat, 34% in Badghis) and brothers (33% in Herat and 23% in Badghis). In Herat, 16% of respondents reported that husbands were perpetrators whereas in Badghis, mothers were the third most common perpetrator identified at 14% followed by husbands at 8%. It is clear from the results of this research that women experience violence from many more sources than men. Key informants identified poverty, culture and customs, lack of education and illiteracy, migration, unemployment, political insecurity, narcotics and the lack of information about rights and the law among the main causes of violence. Read More...

Final Project Evaluation of Women, Peace and Security (WPS) – Afghanistan

The Women, Peace and Security (WPS) project aimed to support the Kabul Women Association (KWA) with the four objectives of: 1) Support Kabul Women Association (KWA) to ensure that it is a well-functioning association, 2) KWA contributes to the increased protection, prevention and response for women’s rights issues, 3) KWA is participating in decision-making processes regarding the implementation of the National Action Plan (NAP) for the Women of Afghanistan (NAPWA) 2008-19; and 4) KWA members have increased economic independence through improve financial skills and access to financial services to start income generating activities. The WPS project was implemented in two provincial districts and seven municipality districts of Kabul province.

The WPS final project evaluation had followed the below rationale and helps to draw out the following:
- This will help generate knowledge from the project and to provide assessment of the processes and achievements made and draw the lessons learnt
- To the extent possible, the relevant results of this evaluation will act as the baseline for the next phase of the project (GEWEP III)
- This evaluation particularly provides results on the two periods of the project (2015-2018 and 2018-2020)
- It provides understanding of what has worked and what has not that can guide future planning

The WPS Final Evaluation collected data on the four outcomes listed under the WPS project results framework which are listed below:
- Outcome 1: The Kabul Women’s Association (KWA) is a well-functioning association
- Outcome 2: KWA contributes to the increased protection, prevention and response for
women’s rights issues
- Outcome 3: KWA is participating in decision-making processes regarding the
implementation of the National Action Plan (NAP) for the Women of Afghanistan
(NAPWA) 2008-2019
- Outcome 4: KWA members have expanded their income opportunities, strengthened
their economic independence and continue to participate in women rights advocacy activities
Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis – Middle East North Africa (MENA)

The COVID-19 pandemic and efforts at mitigating the virus’ spread in recent months have heightened the insecurity, psychosocial distress, economic vulnerability, gender inequality, and deprivation that already existed in countries in the Middle East and beyond. While men appear to have worse outcomes when infected with the coronavirus, women and girls are being deeply impacted– and fragile gains in women’s workforce participation are in jeopardy.

Refugees and the displaced, the majority of them located in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, are now faced with the COVID-19 pandemic and economically damaging efforts at its mitigation. Fragile gains in women’s workforce participation are at risk, gender-based violence is on the rise, and women’s voices are going unheeded. CARE’s soon-to-be-released Rapid Gender Analysis gathers together data from its country offices in MENA and beyond to provide a sobering picture of the pandemic’s impact on women and girls. Read More...

Latin America and the Caribbean rapid gender analysis for COVID-19

Women and girls across Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) are facing a terrifying mix of increased domestic violence and care burden, as well as a lower access to income and jobs, and potential social unrest as a result of the coronavirus outbreaks.

The LAC region has the highest levels of inequality in the world, with wide gaps in living standards across countries, regions, sectors, and socioeconomic spheres. When coupled with the pervasive gender inequality that persists, the response to Covid-19 in LAC becomes immeasurably more complicated. CARE International and UN Women joined forces in Latin America, and the Caribbean on this report which presents a series of recommendations aimed at ensuring a more effective gender-inclusive response in the region. The Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) for COVID-19 is a tool designed to provide information about the different needs, risks, capacities, and coping strategies of women, men, boys, girls, and gender-diverse people during the COVID-19 crisis. This RGA is part of the iterative RGA process for the LAC region and is intended as a programming tool for humanitarian actors. Read More...

Combining GBV and Reproductive Health Services in Cox’s Bazar

Since 2018, CARE has implemented static health services at four health posts in CxB, GBV case management at 12 women and girls’ safe spaces, household and sub-block level sensitization for awareness on service availability through 14 outreach teams, and provision of basic health services at mobile outreach spots at the sub-block level. These comprehensive service and demand-side components addressing individual, household, and community barriers to accessing services have enabled a gender-responsive, integrated approach to reach women and girls. See the learning brief here: https://www.care.org/sites/default/files/cxb_srh_gbv_integration_learning_brief_final.pdf Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis for COVID 19 East, Central and Southern Africa

The impacts – direct and indirect – of public health emergencies fall disproportionally on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups in society. Interconnected social, economic, and political factors pose complex challenges for the ECSA region’s ability to respond to COVID-19. The region already faces significant health challenges that would exacerbate the severity of COVID-19, such as high levels of malnutrition, malaria, anemia, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Access to healthcare in the region is the lowest in the world, thus there is limited capacity to absorb the pandemic1. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the region. Women are at a higher risk for exposure to infection due to the fact that they are often the primary caregivers in the family and constitute 70% of frontline healthcare responders.2 Most women already face limited access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services, and the region struggles with high levels of maternal mortality. For example, mother mortality rates recorded in South Sudan were 1150 per 100 000 live births3. COVID-19 will only increase women’s safety risks and care burdens as health services become stretched and resources shift to COVID-19 responses.
Women and girls are at increased risk of violence during the COVID-19 period. Current rates of violence against women and girls combined with the prevalence of harmful traditional practices leads to increased vulnerability. Income loss and limited mobility, compounded with existing gender role expectations, may contribute to increases in intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence. Read More...

Northern Shan Food Security Project End-of-Project Evaluation

This report presents the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the Final Evaluation for the project: “Northern Shan Food Security Project (NSFSP)”. Implemented by CARE International in Myanmar, launched on January 2017 for three years, and ending on the 30th of December 2019.

The project is designed to accomplish with it specific objective : Increasing capacities of poor and vulnerable households in remote rural areas to strengthen their food and water security through a) income generating activities, b) access to new technological agricultural innovations and products, and c) better access to market opportunities.

The main purpose of the final evaluation was a) To determine the project achievement of its objectives and outputs and b) To identify intended and unintended outcomes, best practices, lessons learned and recommendations to improve future programming in terms of sustainability. Read More...

Mid-Term Evaluation of the Adolescents Empowerment Program (AEP) in Mukuru and Kajiado, 2019

The Adolescents Empowerment Program (AEP) is a five-year (2015-2020) education project that is seeking to empower marginalized in-and out-of-school adolescent girls and boys aged 10-19 years in urban informal Nairobi (Mukuru) and rural Kajiado areas of Kenya. A baseline study was conducted in 2016 to inform implementation of the project. This midline evaluation was conducted in April 2019 to evaluate the progress of the project and inform programming mid-way through its implementation. The results will be used to guide the next steps in program implementation. The specific objectives of the midline study were to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices of adolescents on ASRH, gender norms, saving and economic empowerment, financial literacy, youth leadership and decision making, education and schooling.
Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all