GBV

Etude de base du Projet PACTE

Suite à de nombreuses études au Bénin, il a été révélé qu’au moins 7882 enfants vivent en situation d’exploitation dans les marchés ; 7,2% sont victimes de rapts et séquestrations ; 1,4% sont violées et harcelées sexuellement et 89% font l’objet de traite.
CARE est une Organisation Non Gouvernementale qui intervient au Bénin depuis 1999. Grâce au financement de l’Union Européenne, CARE BENIN/TOGO met en oeuvre le projet « Partenariat Contre le Trafic, l'Exploitation des Enfants et les Violences faites aux Filles et aux Femmes » (PACTE) qui vise à contribuer à l'éradication de l'exploitation et des violences envers les enfants et les femmes au Bénin.
Le projet PACTE intervient dans quatre (04) départements, à raison de deux communes par département : Karimama, Malanville, Kalalé, Nikki, Djougou, Ouaké, Kétou et Pobè.
Pour apprécier les changements induits par le Projet, CARE a initié l’étude pour (i) identifier la valeur de base des indicateurs et(ii) analyser les connaissance, attitudes et pratiques sur la question du trafic, l’exploitation des enfants et les violences faites aux femmes et aux enfants. Read More...

BASELINE SURVEY AND GENDER ANALYSIS FOR “STAND UP, SPEAK OUT: BREAKING THE SILENCE AROUND GENDER BASED VIOLENCE AMONG ETHNIC MINORITY COMMUNITIES IN NORTHERN VIETNAM”

CARE Vietnam (CVN) in coordination with stakeholders is implementing the Project titled Stand Up, Speak Out: Breaking the silence around gender based violence among ethnic minority communities in Northern Vietnam, which is a part CARE’s Remote Ethnic Minority Women’s Program. In CVN’s programming, Gender based violence (GBV) is considered as one of the three focus thematic areas. Within the REMW Program, GBV will be addressed through three dimensions: a) Protection (legal protection, literacy, reform), b) Prevention and Response (engaging with initiatives of others, promoting access to services), and c) expanding the scope of the national agenda to focus on GBV. ”Stand Up, Speak Out” project (SUSO) aims to promote all of the three dimensions for addressing GBV: Protection (legal protection, literacy, reform), through Prevention and Response (engaging with initiatives of others, promoting access to services) and through expanding the scope of the national agenda to focus on GBV.
Proposed actions will challenge the harmful gender norms that accept and normalize GBV in ethnic minority communities, by taking a multi-level, multi-sectoral approach. The project will tackle the taboo nature of GBV by increasing the awareness and understanding about GBV among ethnic minority community members, authorities and service providers. It will work with service providers to improve the support services available for ethnic minority survivors of GBV. At the policy level the project will strengthen implementation of the National Action Plan on GBV through the development of tools and processes that align with the National Action Plan’s priorities and by undertaking advocacy in partnership with an alliance of Vietnamese civil society organisations (CSOs). The project will use a rights based approach to tackle intersectional discrimination by targeting ethnic minority groups in remote and rural areas and being sensitive to GBV survivors with disabilities.
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Mawe Tatu Rapport Etude de Base

Cette étude évalue un programme de développement néerlandaise nommé "Mawe Tatu" (M3), qui vise à l’amélioration de la gestion économique des ménages; à la réduction de la violence basée sur le genre à travers des relations plus égales entre femmes et hommes ; et à la réalisation de comportements de santé sexuelle et reproductive plus sains dans huit territoires dans les provinces du Sud et du Nord Kivu de la RDC. Le programme Mawe Tatu combine pour la première fois une approche de micro finance pour accroître la participation des femmes dans l'économie des ménage avec des interventions favorisant l'égalité entre les sexes à travers la
réduction de la violence basée sur le genre et l'amélioration des droits de santé sexuelle et reproductive des femmes. L’étude examinera les changements dans la participation économique des femmes, la prévalence de la violence basée sur le genre, et la prise de conscience des droits sexuels et reproductifs Read More...

Mawe Tatu English Summary of Endline Evaluation

This summary presents key findings of the endline study contucted to evaluate the effectiveness of the "Mawe Tatu" (M3) program in North and South Kivu Provinces of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The M3 project was implemented to improve the household economy of vulnerable groups, to reduce gender-based violence through improving equity in gender relations; and to improve sexual and reproductive health among women, men, and youth.
Guiding questions included:
1. Did the household economy, and the socio-economic situation of women improve as a result of the introduction of VSLAs?
2. Did men get successfully engaged to support women’s economic autonomy, to reduce gender-based violence, and to support women in their decisions about their sexual and reproductive health?
3. Were young women and men empowered to take healthy decisions for their sexual and reproductive life?

Full evaluation (in French) here: http://www.careevaluations.org/evaluation/mawe-tatu-evaluation-finale-phase-i-et-etude-de-base-partielle-phase-ii/ Read More...

Rwanda Influencing local government planning process to address GBV

strengthening demand- and supply side local governance processes to ensure that local decision-makers incorporate and implement measures for GBV prevention and response into the district level development planning process, which is known as imihigo in Rwanda. This programming experience has highlighted the importance of strengthening women’s and marginalized groups’ participation in the imihigo process and ensuring that district level performance contracts include budgetary allocations for GBV prevention and response activities.
Influencing the imihigo process must however be understood as a long-term advocacy objective. To date, CARE Rwanda’s programming interventions have contributed to changes in the attitudes of local leaders in terms of their understanding of GBV as a development issue and their responsibility for ensuring downwards accountability to their constituents.
The starting point for this influencing process was the implementation from 2010 to 2013 of the Great Lakes Advocacy Initiative across six districts in southern Rwanda. This project aimed to increase national and local leaders’ accountability for the implementation of national GBV policy, as well as building the capacity of women and men activists to receive cases of GBV and to provide referrals to appropriate services and to advocate for quality, affordable and available services in the community. GLAI and subsequent women’s empowerment programming interventions by CARE Rwanda (GEWEP and Umugore Arumvwa – ‘A Woman is Listened To’) which also focussed on GBV prevention and response, provided the foundation for CARE Rwanda to build an understanding of the socio-political context shaping the implementation of GBV legislation at the national and local level and to develop effective working relationships with key ministries such as MIGEPROF.
Implementation of GLAI also involved Read More...

Making Advocacy Count: GBV Advocacy in Rwanda

Over the past 9 years CARE Rwanda has implemented a series of programming interventions designed to promote women’s empowerment and to address Gender-Based Violence (GBV) in Rwanda. Learning from these programmes informed the development of a holistic approach for community based GBV prevention, which is now being scaled up by the Government of Rwanda’s Ministry for Gender Equality and Family Promotion (MIGEPROF) with the intention of reaching national coverage within the next 3-4 years. Read More...

Enhancing holistic emergency GBV prevention, response and mitigation intervention in conflict affected communities in South Sudan

This report provides an independent evaluation of the project on Enhancing Holistic Emergency GBV Prevention, Response and Mitigation Interventions in Conflict Affected Communities of South Sudan. A UNICEF supported Gender and Protection Project in Twic East and Duk Counties of Jonglie State. The overall objective of the project was to ensure that vulnerable women and girls have increased access to life saving multi-sectoral GBV response and prevention services. The project was implemented by Care in South Sudan with funding from UNICEF. This was an emergency response project with a specific focus on GBV case management and psychosocial support. The project had a survivors’ centered approach as an integral part of the response to GBV incidents. The gender progress assessment focused on the effectiveness including Knowledge Attitudes and Practices (KAP) towards GBV, efficiency, the potential impact and sustainability and lessons learnt from the GBV and protection program in Jonglei.
The evaluation used both quantitative and qualitative methods. The primary data collection methods included: (i) Questionnaire administered to 150 households in Panyogor, Kongor Nyuak, Pakeer in Twic East and Ageer in Duk. (ii) Key Informant Interviews (KIIs) with key stakeholders such as: the Department Relief and Rehabilitation commissioner, health, justice, protection, women leaders and Care Staff. (iii) Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were conducted with project beneficiaries (women, men, boys and girls). FGDs with 12 participants each were conducted in each of the five sites - two FGDs for girls, two for women, one for boys and also for men; (iv) relevant documents were reviewed for triangulation purposes. In total, 531 respondents participated in the GBV assessment including 21 key informants, 360 FGD participants and 150 household heads. Read More...

Evidence of Change In Gender Equality and Women‘s Empowerment in the Balkans 2005-2012

This is a report about CARE’s work to advance gender equality in the Balkans and what we have achieved over the past seven years. Our goal is to give account and to demonstrate our commitment to change the lives of the people we serve. We want to illustrate the real life impact of the work we do with our partners and to document the process, methods and the tools used. We want to show that what we and partners have achieved, is relevant to the regional context and that our approaches and methodologies make a demonstrable difference. We also want to learn from our challenges and limitations, and we will use these lessons in our future work. Read More...

Indashyikirwa programme to reduce intimate partner violence in Rwanda: Report of findings from a cluster randomized control trial

Intimate partner violence (IPV), which includes physical and sexual violence, economic abuse and emotional aggression within intimate relationships, is the most common form of violence against women globally. IPV can lead to a wide range of negative health consequences including depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, post-traumatic stress disorder, drug and alcohol abuse, serious injuries, and death. The Indashyikirwa programme in Rwanda sought to reduce experience of IPV among women and perpetration of IPV among men, and also to shift beliefs and social norms that sustain IPV in communities and couples. The programme also strove to support equitable, non-violent relationships, and ensure more supportive and empowering responses to survivors of IPV seeking assistance. The impact evaluation of Indashyikirwa assessed whether and how the programme met these objectives and sought to inform the global best practices in IPV prevention by generating evidence through a rigorous community randomized controlled trial (cRCT).

The quantitative impact evaluation of Indashykirwa took the form of a cRCT with randomization at sector level and two separate evaluation components: (1) a cohort of control and intervention couples interviewed at baseline, 12 months, and 24 months, and (2) a pair of cross-sectional community surveys with control and intervention communities implemented at the beginning of the programme and 24 months later. This quantitative impact evaluation was accompanied by in-depth process evaluation and qualitative research with beneficiaries and programme staff. Read More...

Safe Schools for Girls Project Midline Evaluation

Throughout the past two decades, Rwanda has made significant efforts to improve the coverage of education to ensure that all Rwandans have access to quality education through the completion of secondary school. Despite policies to increase access to basic education and increase enrolment rates, dropout remains a key issue, especially in secondary school where female students tend to have lower completion rates than male students.

To promote better educational, social, and economic outcomes for students, CARE Rwanda established the Safe Schools for Girls (SS4G) Project. Operating in the Southern Province of Rwanda, the SS4G Project provided holistic support--including academic resources, financial literacy training, and sexual and reproductive health education, and leadership training--to students to address obstacles to secondary education. As the SS4G project passes its mid-way point in 2019, CARE Rwanda commissioned this evaluation to assess trends and changes over time in students’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to the intervention aims, in order to better understand areas that were performing well and identify those that needed revised efforts. Read More...

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