Gender Equality

Working with Youth at Risk in the Balkans Case Study

Capturing 5 different models of working on prevention of radicalization and extremism in 5 countries in the Balkans capturing core impact elements on youth, parents, teachers, and other relevant stakeholders/community members that is developed by CARE and partners. (Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Albania, Croatia) [52 pages]. Read More...

Covid-19 Digital Response Case Study

The case study captures and documents the process of YMI’s adaptation to the COVID-19 pandemic during the period March-July 2020 in countries in the Balkans (Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Albania, Croatia) and represents a unique contribution and source for other organizations that are going through the same process of adaptation [38 pages]. Read More...

Scaling up Case Study How to Transform a Transformation

Captures the modalities of scaling up of CAREs gender transformative programming in high schools in Balkan countries (Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Albania, Croatia) used by CARE and local partners [33 pages]. Read More...

Improving Adolescent Reproductive Health and Nutrition through Structural Solutions in West Hararghe Zone, Oromia, Ethiopia Abdiboru Project Final

The final evaluation is divided into three parts, qualitative, quantitative and triangulation final reports.
Triangulation: this project objective was to empower girls through improved reproductive health, nutrition, and education in rural West Hararghe, Ethiopia. It examines the effectiveness of two different set of interventions- a combination of structural and induvial interventions Vs structural, individual, and community level interventions against a control group. Ethiopia is one of the countries in the world characterized by high level of early marriage. In most cases, when girls marry, they move to their husband’s household and are socially isolated, work long hours, and have very little say in decisions that affect them. Keeping girls in schools is essential to their future wellbeing, and Ethiopia has made significant progress on its commitments. But in rural areas, it has been difficult to achieve high levels of secondary schooling for girls. Nutrition is deeply interconnected with reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health. Household gender dynamics often mean that girls are more food-insecure than their male counterparts. Female adolescents, those living in a household with food insecurity and high dependency ratio are more likely to suffer from household food allocation. Schooling, early marriage and nutritional status and overall girls’ empowerment are interrelated maters. They have a complex relationship one affecting the other significantly.

Addressing the issues in package is believed to bring the maximum benefit in improving the social, health and development of adolescent girls and thus empowering them in multiple dimensions. Yet programs that focus sectorally, targeting health indicators of women and girls while ignoring the broader context that radically constricts their choices, have not generated significant or sustained impact over the long term. The structural context in which girls live is the main driver of their reproductive, maternal, and nutritional health and educational opportunities. Read More...

When Time Won’t Wait (Spanish, French, and Arabic)

Humanitarian crises can offer a ‘window of opportunity’ to transform unequal gender relations and shift harmful gender norms. Integration of gender into humanitarian programming ensures that the specific vulnerabilities, needs, capacities and priorities of women, girls, men and boys — related to pre-existing gender roles and inequalities, along with the impacts of the crisis — are recognised and addressed.
Sound gender analysis and programming from the outset is critical to effective crisis response in the short-term, and equitable and empowering societal change in the long-term. CARE’s Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) approach and tool, developed during the humanitarian response in Syria in 2013, aims to drive a shift to locally driven and women-centered needs assessment which influences how needs are defined and responses are developed. The approach aims to provide essential information about gender roles and responsibilities, capacities, and vulnerabilities together with programming recommendations in situations where time is of the essence
and resources can be scarce. The ultimate goal of such an approach is to influence humanitarian response, program design and implementation to ensure that it supports not only the immediate needs of women and girls but also upholds their rights. CARE’s RGA has now been used in over 50 crises around the word and is featured as good practice in the Inter-Agency Standing Committee’s (IASC) Gender Handbook for Humanitarian Action. With rapidly increasing interest in and adoption of CARE’s RGA approach, discussion and questions continue as to whether increased awareness of gender, power and disaggregated data sets are translating into safer, more responsive, and effective aid.
To answer these questions, CARE commissioned an external evaluation to ‘provide an analysis of the effectiveness and influence of the RGA approach on adapting programming to improve gendered outcomes for crises-affected communities.’ The scope of the evaluation was global and focused on rapid gender analyses and related humanitarian programming over the period 2015-2020. These are executive summaries in Spanish, Arabic, and French. You can find the full report in English here: http://careevaluations.org/evaluation/when-time-wont-wait-cares-rapid-gender-analysis-approach-external-evaluation/ Read More...

The Impact of COVID-19 on Women in Democratic Republic of Congo

Evidence worldwide indicates that women are disproportionately affected by the health and socio-economic impacts of intervention
measures applied for the control of COVID-19. Women make up the majority of the informal labour sector and are more likely to suffer job losses or reduced income as a result of closed borders, markets and shops, and restricted movement. Sexual and reproductive health services are often the first to face restrictions in terms of availability and access. School closures place an additional burden on women, who take on childcare responsibilities, including ensuring adequate nutrition. Girls who cannot go to school are at increased risk of sexual violence, pregnancy, and early marriage - a trend that was widely observed in areas affected by Ebola during the 2014-2016 epidemic in West Africa. Risks are exacerbated for women and girls living in the poorest households in remote rural areas.
Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in March 2020, mixed methods data produced by the Social Sciences Analytics Cell (CASS) and its partners presents a dynamic where pre-existing disparities between men and women in terms of health, social protection and economic status are being exacerbated by the outbreak and its response. This report presents an integrated multidisciplinary analysis of the impact of COVID-19 and its response on women and girls in the DRC, highlighting changes that have occurred since the beginning of the outbreak. The objective of this report is to provide evidence to support decision-making for strategies to respond to the outbreak to ensure that the health, protection and economic security of women and girls is prioritised. Read More...

COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis DR Congo

Depuis le début de l’épidémie déclarée le 10 mars 2020 jusqu’en date du 26 Aout 2020, le cumul des cas est de 9.915, dont 9.914 cas confirmés et 1 cas probable. Au total, il y a eu 255 décès (254 cas confirmés et 1 cas probable) et 9.020 personnes guéries.i
En RDC, la prévention et la réponse à la pandémie COVID 19 sont guidées au niveau National par un « Plan de préparation et de riposte à l’épidémie de COVID 19 » publié en début Mars 2020. Ce plan comprend 9 objectifs bien définis mais les aspects spécifiques aux questions de protection transversale et de genre sont faiblement développés.
Quoi que les données nationales qui renseignent sur la situation épidémiologique en RDC ne soient pas désagrégées par âge et par sexe, il est évident que les hommes, femmes, filles et garçons des différents âges, situations sociales confondues ne sont pas touchées de la même manière par la pandémie à COVID 19 surtout que déjà traditionnellement, il s’observe un déséquilibre entre les hommes, les femmes, les filles et les garçons au niveau des rôles, responsabilités, accès et contrôle, participation et prise de décision et au niveau des aspects de protection.
Dans le souci d’améliorer sa mise en oeuvre pendant la période de la pandémie, CARE I DRC a fait une analyse genre rapide période du 15 Avril jusqu’en fin Mai 2020. Une mise à jour a été faite sur base des informations recueillies le 18 Juillet 2020. Cette analyse qualitative vise à renseigner sur les problèmes spécifiques des femmes, hommes, filles et garçons pendant cette période de pandémie à COVID 19. Les éléments issus des données secondaires appuieront la triangulation des informations. Les thématiques d’analyse sont : rôles et responsabilités, accès aux ressources, services et l’information, prise des décisions, influence des croyances, sécurité, et sante / bien être. Les informations ont été recueillies dans les villes urbaines et cités rurales dans lesquelles CARE I mène des activités et a des bureaux et au moins 1 staff. Les provinces concernées sont le Nord Kivu (Beni, Butembo, Goma et territoire de Nyiragongo), Sud Kivu (Bukavu et Uvira) et la ville province de Kinshasa. Read More...

RAPPORT DEFINITIF BASELINE PROSPER II Thriving Cocoa Community Cargill

Cette étude dont l’objectif était de déterminer la situation actuelle des ménages producteurs de cacao dans les treize (13) nouvelles communautés sélectionnées du Projet PROSPER II sur les quatre (04) axes d’intervention du projet : (i) la gouvernance communautaire ; (ii) l’inclusion financière et des compétences entrepreneuriales des femmes ; (iii) la diversification des sources de revenus des ménages agricoles incluant la nutriton ; (iv) les solutions alternatives communautaires au travail des enfants ; afin que puissent être mesurés les changements qui interviendront après les trois (03) prochaines années de mise en œuvre, en utilisant la même approche, a démontré que la situation actuelle desdits ménages n’est guère réluisante. C’est ce que l’analyse des résultats combinés aux sources sécondaires et primaires notamment la collecte de terrain et les discussions de groupe nous permet d’indiquer. [97 pages]. Read More...

Evaluation finale du Project Sahel COVID-19 Response in Mali dans la Region de Mopti

Le projet « Sahel COVID-19 Response in Mali » a été mis en œuvre par l’ONG CARE International au Mali pour une durée de 6 mois allant du 1er Mai au 31 Octobre 2020 dans les cercles de Mopti, Bandiagara, Bankass, Douentza et Koro, dont 5 sites de déplacés. Il a ciblé 815 ménages directement pour les activités d’assistance et des dizaines de milliers pour celles de la sensibilisation. Les secteurs de réponse du projet comprennent le WASH, la Sécurité alimentaires, l’accès aux services de santé reproductive et le Genre & Violence basée sur le genre.
Cette évaluation finale a été commanditée afin d’établir le niveau d’atteint des indicateurs du cadre logique du projet en référence à l’étude de base et de disposer des caractéristiques des marchés [69 pages]. Read More...

THE EMERGENCY MOBILE HEALTH, NUTRITION & PROTECTION PROJECT IN EASTERN EQUATORIA, SOUTH SUDAN Final Evaluation

This report is presented by Adroit Consult International following a successful evaluation of the Emergency Mobile Health, Nutrition & Protection Project in Eastern Equatoria, South Sudan. This main objective of the endline evaluation was to provide information on the impact of the 3 year integrated Health, Nutrition and Gender Based Violence (GBV) project and also measure results at the outcome and impact levels. The evaluation was conducted with project stakeholders such as; Community leaders, Households of beneficiaries, Individual women and men, Children under five, Health workers, Government officials, CSO/NGO partners among others, and covered the areas of Lopa Lafon and Ikotos. The evaluation reached a total of 287 respondents in project implementation areas [27 pages]. Read More...

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