Water

Learning From Failure 2019

Driven by a wish to learn more from what goes wrong in our programming, and to examine where changes to the broader organization and system can improve our programming and impact globally, in 2019 CARE undertook its first evaluations-based failure meta-analysis. This analysis draws learning and evidence from 114 evaluations of CARE’s work from 2015-2018 to understand the patterns and trends in what goes wrong. This helps us take a data-driven approach to strategic investments and action plans to live out CARE’s commitment to high program quality and continuous improvement across the board.
The review draws from project specific data, but deliberately anonymizes the data and focuses on overarching trends to remove blame for any specific project team or set of individuals. This exercise is designed to help us learn more about how we can change our processes and patterns of support and engagement around weak areas to improve our work. CARE is using this data to build action plans and next steps to continuously improve our programming.
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Pathways Project End of Project Evaluation Report

Pathways aimed to increase productivity and income in equitable agriculture systems. CARE innovated an effective Theory of Change to address real issues affecting rural women farmers by providing them with capacities in agriculture; access to inputs, extension services and markets; empowerment to influence decisions; and an enabling environment for growth.

Pathways has met and, in most cases, surpassed targets set in its M&E framework. In the words of women themselves the project has worked very well, focusing on groundnuts and soybean as high-value cash crop substitutes for tobacco because of their high potential for markets, ability to replenish the lost soil fertility and strong nutritional value. It has grown from working with 9,000 to 14,282 farmers (hosting a population of 71,410 people), organising them into 1,528 groups. Women provide leadership to most of the groups after being transformed to become successful wives, farmers and entrepreneurs who can make independent decisions and speak in public.

In 2015 alone, collective sale revenues from groundnuts and soy amounted to MK128, 601,938 (US$233,821.7) and rose to MK854, 356,267 (US$751,511) by the end of 2017. Contract farming organized by the project contributed US$34,233 to these revenues. In 2014, the project conducted 188 community-wide gender dialogue sessions and reached out to 9,654 people, 7193 female and 2464 male, helping them to internalize and address gender inequalities. Men have generally started looking at women as partners in agriculture and development that is cementing marriage bonds and creating an enabling environment for women to succeed. Along with this, CARE Malawi linked women farmers to key players in the groundnut and soy value chains to help them excel.

As a consequence, by December 2016 a total of 246 farmer groups had accounts with OIBM and other banks through which they saved MK49, 175,577 and 6 VSLs accessed two group loans worth MK4,800,000 (US$7,804.88) which they invested in agriculture, business and VSL activities. VSLs profited and shared out US$871,178 in the year, with more benefits seen in 2017 when savings accumulated to US$3,756,435 e.g. earnings of MK47, 489.32 to MK204, 769.33 per household on average. In turn, per capita household monthly incomes and expenditures doubled by the time the project closed in December 2018. Although agricultural productivity continued to decline over the project life due to poor weather conditions, Pathways farmers remained food secure and continued to eat at least two meals a day. Household dietary diversity (HDDS) and women intra-household food access (AHA) data from this evaluation found levels of consumption to be acceptable and typical of food secure households. These results showcase that Pathways beneficiaries have grown their incomes, assets and food availability in the face of the changing climate and are better off even in difficult years. Read More...

ACCES

L’initiative ACCES, a été mise en oeuvre dans les départements du Borgou et l’Ouémé du 1er septembre 2011 au 31 décembre 2016. Au cours de cette période, quatre composantes ont été exécutées en collaboration avec les acteurs étatiques, les partenaires communaux et l’institution Eau et Assainissement par l’Afrique (EAA) à travers la conduite de différentes activités liées aux résultats du cadre logique de l’intervention. Read More...

ACCESS Evaluation 2017

The ACCES Initiative is a project cofinanced by the European Union, CARE France, the Mairie of Paris, and ten communes in the Ouémé and Borgou departments of Benin. The primary promotor and implementer of the project was CARE International Benin/Togo and the targeted communes were Kalalé, N’Dali, Nikki, Pèrèrè, Tchaourou, Adjarra, Adjohoun, Akpro-Missérété, Bonou, Dangbo. The project lasted five years,with the goal of significantly improving access to infrastructure and services related to water, sanitation, and hygiene for 80 villages, 32 schools, and 10 health centers in ten rural communities of Benin. This was done through the construction and/or rehabilitation of water pumps and the extension of gravity schemes, the installation of incinerators in health centers, and the installation of latrines, trashcans, and urinals in primary schools. Additionally, trainings in management of the new installations were given to local actors and committees to foster self-reliance and local management, and Community Led Total Sanitation was used by facilitators to build demand for sanitation and to decrease or eliminate the practice of open defecation. Read More...

Rano WASH Baseline

CARE, in partnership with Catholic Relief Services (CRS), WaterAid, and local partners Bushproof and Sandandrano, presented an innovative approach under the Rural Access to New Opportunities in Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (RANO WASH). The consortium capitalized on strong existing relationships with the Ministry of Water, Energy and Hydrocarbons (MEEH), municipalities and key stakeholders, and worked in close coordination with other USAID programs to address critical gaps in the WASH sector.
According to the MEEH’s Water and Sanitation Sector 2013 Yearbook, water and sanitation statistics in Madagascar are among the worst in the world and the country is far from achieving universal access to WASH services in 2030. The challenges to accelerate and expand the use of improved, sustainably managed WASH services are three-fold: Weak WASH governance, monitoring, and management capacities; Weak private sector/WASH supply; and Unhealthy behaviors/low demand for WASH. RANO WASH aims to increase equitable and sustainable access to WASH services to maximize the impact on human health and nutrition and preserve the environment in 250 rural communes in Vatovavy Fitovinany, Atsinanana, Amoron’i Mania, Haute Matsiatra, Vakinankaratra, and Alaotro Mangoro. Read More...

WASH Knowledge Attitudes and Practices (KAP) Baseline

CARE Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) Base-line Survey Report is part of the Global Affairs Canada 2017-2019 Project on WASH. CARE’s proposed three-year WASH program will provide critical water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services to IDPs and host communities in Duhok and Ninawa governorates; improve overall WASH services for women, men, boys and girls; and reduce tensions between the host community and IDPs.

In collaboration with local authorities and communities, CARE and its partners will undertake WASH activities including repair and maintenance of latrines and water supply systems, water quality testing, improved waste management and establishment or support to existing WASH Committees and authorities to operate, repair and manage WASH facilities. The proposed activities will complement CARE’s existing GAC-funded WASH programs, and expand our reach within Duhok and into Ninawa. CARE’s programming choices also reflect the increased burden of host communities in the Iraqi crisis. Read More...

Informe de Evaluación Proyecto Gobernabilidad del Agua + Género

Las OMAS (Oficinas Municipales de Agua y Saneamiento) han sido creadas con creadas con el propósito de fortalecer la gestión sostenible y la prestación de los servicios de agua potable y saneamiento en el ámbito urbano y rural. Articula la respuesta a la demanda social de manera coordinada con los esfuerzos municipales y de entidades nacionales e internacionales que intervienen en el municipio. En Guatemala no existieron hasta hace una década. Antes de las OMAS, las oficinas de gobiernos locales no tuvieron personal específicamente encargado de garantizar el funcionamiento de los sistemas de agua. Helvetas ayudo a aperturar la primer OMAS en el año 2007 en el departamento de San Marcos. Antes del 2007 y desde el 2000 al 2004, CARE trabajó con dos municipalidades para establecer Oficinas Forestales Municipales (OFM) que tenían como objetivo la protección y conservación de recursos naturales, incluyendo el recurso agua. CARE implementó un modelo a través del cual se encargó de proveer asistencia técnica y financiera (reduciendo % de salarios a través del tiempo), mientras que el Instituto Nacional de Bosques (INAB) se encargó de la promoción política + asistencia técnica y las municipalidades de proveer espacio para la oficina y absorción progresiva de costos salariales del personal. En el año 2012, CARE Guatemala fortaleció el modelo OMAS a través de la capacitación del personal en temas técnicos de operación y mantenimiento de los sistemas de agua y conservación de los bosques, así como elementos de administración, transparencia y finanzas. CARE también contribuyó en la implementación de tres OMAS adicionales en el departamento de San Marcos. En el 2012, había menos de 10 OMAS en San Marcos. Hasta agosto de 2018, 28 de los 30 municipios de San Marcos han establecido OMAS. Actualmente hay 117 OMAS (o equivalente a OMAS) en Guatemala de los 340 municipios del país. Cada año, más Alcaldes eligen tener una Oficina Municipal de Agua y Saneamiento para que sea la responsable de la gestión de los servicios de agua y saneamiento (en otros departamentos de Guatemala a veces se usa otros nombres además de OMAS). [14 pages] Read More...

Sustainability of Water Systems in Tacaná, San Marcos built over the last 25 years

CARE Guatemala has worked in water and sanitation in Tacaná for over 10 years. CARE has helped construct potable water systems, trained community members to manage the systems, improved sanitation in schools, and led sanitation workshops for students. Most recently, CARE was involved in the Lazos de Agua (Water Links) project, which was completed in October 2016, in the municipalities of Tacaná and Tajumulco. One of the project’s main goals was to increase access to sustainable, safe water for at least 5,000 people1. In addition to providing access to clean water, it is imperative to ensure the sustainability of improved water systems into the future. In order to monitor the functioning of the water systems, the Municipal Water and Sanitation office (OMAS) was created in Tacaná in 2012. The OMAS is responsible for the operation, management and maintenance of the water systems in both urban and rural areas of Tacaná. However, neither the OMAS nor CARE have had adequate resources to consistently monitor the water systems that have been built over the last 25 years. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functionality and sustainability of the water systems constructed by CARE and other organizations over the past 25 years in Tacaná. [11 pages] Read More...

A Rapid Study on Sanitation in Garissa County, Kenya

Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) is the method adopted by the Kenyan Government for expanding sanitation coverage. CARE Kenya – within the Kenya RAPID program – has been assigned 65 villages outside of Garissa town, to support the implementation of the CLTS method, and ultimately support the achievement of Open Defecation Free (ODF) villages. CARE essentially allocates the per diem and transport of local County Public Health Officers (CPHOs), who are responsible for carrying out the CLTS method in the community: pre-triggering, triggering and (some) post-triggering follow-up. To date CARE has supported the triggering of six villages, and “re-energizing” five villages and none have made significant progress toward full sanitation coverage. In the 582 villages where UNICEF is supporting CLTS rollout, 27 have been certified ODF and another 130 are nearly there (claimed or verified). In Sept 2018, CARE conducted a study on CLTS and sanitation to understand barriers to latrine construction and delays in ODF achievement. [13 pages] Read More...

SDVC II Social Impact Studies

The study has explored dietary diversity, milk consumption, and perception of nutrition, hand washing and hygiene practices of SDVC project participants of four upazila namely Kaunia, Badargonj, Shajadpur and Gabtoli of three districts of Northern part of Bangladesh. For this topic a total 6 FGDs and 12 key informant interviews have conducted with 84 women group members of SDVC project. The group members and DFT center have selected based on length of membership and duration of installment of DFT. (15 pages) Read More...

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