Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Baseline Study of the Title II Development Food Assistance Program in Haiti

In fiscal year 2013, the U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Office of Food for Peace (FFP) awarded funding to CARE International and its partners, Action Contre La Faim International (ACF) and the U.N. World Food Programme (WFP), to implement a Title II development food assistance program in Haiti.1 The four-year Kore Lavi Program directly supports the Government of Haiti’s (GOH) social protection efforts. The overall objective of the program is to reduce food insecurity and vulnerability by supporting the GOH in establishing a replicable safety net system and expanding capacities for preventing child undernutrition.

KEY FINDINGS.
The Title II program area residents face challenges in all four pillars of food security: (1) availability of food, (2) access to food, (3) utilization of food and (4) stability.

Survey results indicate that 57.5 percent of households suffer from moderate hunger and 13.5 percent of households suffer from severe hunger.

An HDDS of 6.2 indicates that households in the Kore Lavi Program area typically can access and consume 6 of 12 basic food groups. Qualitative data indicate that food consumption is pragmatic at the household level. Individual families eat what is available, what they can grow or what they can afford to purchase. Despite these challenges, many respondents spoke ardently to beliefs about the cultural significance of certain foods, while also holding strong opinions on imported food in comparison to locally produced food.

The household survey data show that 69 percent of all households have an adequate level of food consumption, 22 percent score at the borderline level, and 9 percent score at the poor level.

Across the Kore Lavi Program area, 43.6 percent of households currently live in extreme poverty (less than the international poverty line of USD$1.25 at 2005 prices), with average daily per capita expenditures of constant USD$ 2.10.

The household survey data show that 40 percent of households use an improved drinking water source and 16 percent of households use a non-shared improved sanitation facility.

As measured by body mass index (BMI), the nutritional status of women 15-49 years of age who are not pregnant or two months post-partum is generally satisfactory despite a lack of dietary diversity.

The survey data reveal that 8 percent of children under five years of age in the Kore Lavi Program area show signs of being moderately or severely underweight, and 19 percent of children under five years of age are stunted.

Across the qualitative data, views about gender equality tended to be polarized, rooted historically and in tradition. Read More...

Emergency Water, Sanitation, Hygiene and Nutrition for Crisis Affected Communities in East Darfur and South Darfur, Sudan, 2017-2019

The project under evaluation was a two-year project implemented in one locality in South Darfur and three localities in East Darfur during the years 2017 and 2019. The Project was implemented by CIS in partnership with two local organizations and in cooperation with the State institutions.

The intervention activities are tailored to address urgent lifesaving needs of the vulnerable communities through improving communities’ access to WASH facilities and nutrition services. Where, the two components are expected to complement each other and the resultant outcomes are expected to reflect on the improvement of maternal and child health in particular.

The ccomparison of the actual implementation with the planned showed that the types of the activities implemented conform to the planned and that planned outputs are almost completed in accordance with the plan in quantitative and qualitative terms. while the number of beneficiaries reached exceeded the target by about 30%.
As immediate outcomes, IDPs and refugees’ camps expressed improvement in their access to safe drinking water, where 98.6% indicated obtaining water from protected sources. They also revealed satisfaction with availability of water by 65% of the HHs and the water distance has been cut to about 320 m in SD and to 106 m in ED, with an average water distance of 213 meter.

Evident progress has been made along communities’ access to and use of latrines, including women, where, 89.3% and 86.1% of target community members indicated their access to and regular use of latrines. The created hygiene awareness has induced the required positive changes in hygiene and sanitation attitude and practices among communities.

In overall, the treatment of malnutrition reached 80% of the cases and for both girls and boys the cure rate is 75% also for both sexes and the Number of MAM cases treated ranges between 10 to 15 daily, while number of PLW treated ranged between 4 to 7 women daily.

Ultimately, The WASH and nutrition interventions the project delivered so far have addressed emergency humanitarian needs of the IDPs and host communities, without which their lives would have been at great risk. The inadequate unsafe water sources are now more accessible, clean and healthy. The personal hygiene and environment has much improved due to increased awareness and positive change in attitude and practices. VSLAs have added a new livelihood means for women and their families by starting to save and becoming economically active and contributing to households’ budget.
Read More...

Baseline Survey Report for a WASH project in West Mosul

This is a baseline survey report for the "Improving Sanitation, Hygiene, Renovation of Sewage System" project, funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic.
There are two priority issues to be addressed by this project: a) significant health risks posed by accumulation of solid waste in key arteries of West Mosul (Cree stream), precluding the effective flow of gray water towards the river as well as damaged pipes which serve to remove black water from residential areas (Al-Thawra neighborhood), and b) limited civic engagement and ownership of residential environment, resulting in poor communal hygiene practices and a high burden on local authorities, which are operating under severely reduced capacity to address needs.
A base-line survey was conducted to identify the current water, hygiene and sanitation conditions in the neighborhood, beneficiaries’ specific needs (disaggregated by men, women, boys and girls) and overall awareness towards water, hygiene and sanitation measures. In order to measure the impact of this projects base line data will be evaluated against end line data collected after project closure. Read More...

Endline evaluation of WASH project in West Mosul, Iraq

This is an endline evaluation for the "Improving Sanitation, Hygiene, Renovation of Sewage Systems" project, funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic.
This project addressed critical needs for sanitation services in West Mosul, as a direct contribution to enable the affected populations to return home. The project aimed to repair two vital sanitation resources/infrastructure in West Mosul and to support the municipal authorities to build their capacity to eventually recover their costs, once the situation allows. Finally, the project intended to mobilize local communities towards greater ownership for their local environment, to avoid the recurrence of such sanitation risks and maintain a cleaner, more habitable environment. In addition to mitigate a number of health risks related to poor sanitation in urban areas, CARE’s engagement aimed to promote social cohesion and community participation among vulnerable populations affected by the conflict.
The End-line project Evaluation is intended to assess the relevance, performance, management arrangements and success of the project. It looks at signs of potential impact of project activities on men,
women, girls and boys identified as vulnerable and the sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development. The Evaluation also identifies, and documents lessons learnt and makes recommendations that project staff and the stakeholders might use to improve the design and implementation of other related projects and programs. Read More...

WASH Support to IDPs & host communities in Duhlok and Ninawa, Iraq (2017-2019)

CARE’s GAC funded WASH project started in January 2017 providing critical water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services to improve overall WASH services for women, men, boys and girls and reduce tensions between the host community and IDPs in the areas of 4 IDP camps (Mamrashan, Essyan, Sheikhan, and Chamishko), and host community collectives (Ardawan, Ba’adre, Kalakchi, Mahate and Ayas) of Duhok Governorate. The project also had an emergency response component in November 2017 in three neighbourhoods of West Mosul (Al-Mansour, Al-Jawsaq and Wadi Al-Hajar). The project is implemented through two local partners Harikar and REACH. Working through partners is a key modality of CARE’s country strategy to strengthen the capacity of local NGOs. This approach has had a significant impact in achieving the GAC aim of supporting vulnerable and conflict-affected people living in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The ongoing WASH intervention aims to provide 55,572 (27,318 women & 28,434 men)2 IDPs and members of host communities with access to water supply, safe sanitary facilities and increased awareness on safe hygiene practices in a dignified, gender-sensitive and culturally appropriate manner.
The midterm project evaluation aims to assess the relevance, performance, and progress on targets within the project. It looks at signs of potential impact of project activities on men, women, girls and boys identified as vulnerable and the sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development. The evaluation also identifies, and documents lessons learnt and makes recommendations for CARE Iraq and project partners to improve the implementation of the final year of the GAC project as well and strengthen the design of future related projects. Read More...

Strengthening WASH basic infrastructure, resilience and livelihoods in return areas in Ninawa, Iraq

This baseline report was prepared as part of the multi-sectoral project in Sinjar and Telafar districts, Ninawa governorate. The project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development, BMZ. CARE International in Iraq, in partnership with two local NGOs, namely Harikar and HOPE are planning to implement the project in two districts in Ninawa governorate, Telafar and Sinjar. It is intended to implement activities in three geographic locations within the two selected districts, Telafar city and Zummar town in Telafar district and Sinjar area in Sinjar district. Zummar’s population is about 118,000 individuals (19,000 families). Approx. 80% (around 15,000 families) of the population have now returned to Zummar. Telafar’s population is about 200,000 individuals (40,000 families). Around 25% of the total displaced population has returned according to local Telafar authorities. Sinjar city hosts a population of about 24,000 individuals (4,000 families) .
Field work was conducted in early January 2019. The aim of the multi-sectorial baseline assessment was to collect information on the current situation in the areas of Water Supply, Hygiene and Sanitation Practices, House, Land and Property (HLP), Livelihood and Governance in the target areas.
Read More...

Learning From Failure 2019

Driven by a wish to learn more from what goes wrong in our programming, and to examine where changes to the broader organization and system can improve our programming and impact globally, in 2019 CARE undertook its first evaluations-based failure meta-analysis. This analysis draws learning and evidence from 114 evaluations of CARE’s work from 2015-2018 to understand the patterns and trends in what goes wrong. This helps us take a data-driven approach to strategic investments and action plans to live out CARE’s commitment to high program quality and continuous improvement across the board.
The review draws from project specific data, but deliberately anonymizes the data and focuses on overarching trends to remove blame for any specific project team or set of individuals. This exercise is designed to help us learn more about how we can change our processes and patterns of support and engagement around weak areas to improve our work. CARE is using this data to build action plans and next steps to continuously improve our programming.
Read More...

Pathways Project End of Project Evaluation Report

Pathways aimed to increase productivity and income in equitable agriculture systems. CARE innovated an effective Theory of Change to address real issues affecting rural women farmers by providing them with capacities in agriculture; access to inputs, extension services and markets; empowerment to influence decisions; and an enabling environment for growth.

Pathways has met and, in most cases, surpassed targets set in its M&E framework. In the words of women themselves the project has worked very well, focusing on groundnuts and soybean as high-value cash crop substitutes for tobacco because of their high potential for markets, ability to replenish the lost soil fertility and strong nutritional value. It has grown from working with 9,000 to 14,282 farmers (hosting a population of 71,410 people), organising them into 1,528 groups. Women provide leadership to most of the groups after being transformed to become successful wives, farmers and entrepreneurs who can make independent decisions and speak in public.

In 2015 alone, collective sale revenues from groundnuts and soy amounted to MK128, 601,938 (US$233,821.7) and rose to MK854, 356,267 (US$751,511) by the end of 2017. Contract farming organized by the project contributed US$34,233 to these revenues. In 2014, the project conducted 188 community-wide gender dialogue sessions and reached out to 9,654 people, 7193 female and 2464 male, helping them to internalize and address gender inequalities. Men have generally started looking at women as partners in agriculture and development that is cementing marriage bonds and creating an enabling environment for women to succeed. Along with this, CARE Malawi linked women farmers to key players in the groundnut and soy value chains to help them excel.

As a consequence, by December 2016 a total of 246 farmer groups had accounts with OIBM and other banks through which they saved MK49, 175,577 and 6 VSLs accessed two group loans worth MK4,800,000 (US$7,804.88) which they invested in agriculture, business and VSL activities. VSLs profited and shared out US$871,178 in the year, with more benefits seen in 2017 when savings accumulated to US$3,756,435 e.g. earnings of MK47, 489.32 to MK204, 769.33 per household on average. In turn, per capita household monthly incomes and expenditures doubled by the time the project closed in December 2018. Although agricultural productivity continued to decline over the project life due to poor weather conditions, Pathways farmers remained food secure and continued to eat at least two meals a day. Household dietary diversity (HDDS) and women intra-household food access (AHA) data from this evaluation found levels of consumption to be acceptable and typical of food secure households. These results showcase that Pathways beneficiaries have grown their incomes, assets and food availability in the face of the changing climate and are better off even in difficult years. Read More...

ACCES

L’initiative ACCES, a été mise en oeuvre dans les départements du Borgou et l’Ouémé du 1er septembre 2011 au 31 décembre 2016. Au cours de cette période, quatre composantes ont été exécutées en collaboration avec les acteurs étatiques, les partenaires communaux et l’institution Eau et Assainissement par l’Afrique (EAA) à travers la conduite de différentes activités liées aux résultats du cadre logique de l’intervention. Read More...

ACCESS Evaluation 2017

The ACCES Initiative is a project cofinanced by the European Union, CARE France, the Mairie of Paris, and ten communes in the Ouémé and Borgou departments of Benin. The primary promotor and implementer of the project was CARE International Benin/Togo and the targeted communes were Kalalé, N’Dali, Nikki, Pèrèrè, Tchaourou, Adjarra, Adjohoun, Akpro-Missérété, Bonou, Dangbo. The project lasted five years,with the goal of significantly improving access to infrastructure and services related to water, sanitation, and hygiene for 80 villages, 32 schools, and 10 health centers in ten rural communities of Benin. This was done through the construction and/or rehabilitation of water pumps and the extension of gravity schemes, the installation of incinerators in health centers, and the installation of latrines, trashcans, and urinals in primary schools. Additionally, trainings in management of the new installations were given to local actors and committees to foster self-reliance and local management, and Community Led Total Sanitation was used by facilitators to build demand for sanitation and to decrease or eliminate the practice of open defecation. Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all