Turkey

COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis Middle East and North Africa Region

The novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been wreaking havoc on the international community in recent weeks and months, leaving almost no corner untouched. As of 8th April 2020, 1,464,852 cases and 85,397 deaths have been recorded in 212 countries1, including all countries in the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) region with the exception of Yemen. MENA is at a critical stage in containing the pandemic. Some countries have been successful in curtailing the spread by utilizing stringent lockdown measures, while other more fragile and conflict-affected countries, that are less equipped for additional crises, are only beginning to face the inevitable spread of the virus, with incredibly diminished health infrastructures. Widespread conflict, displacement, and migration in the region significantly complicates a controlled response to COVID-19, and extreme water scarcity makes
preventative measures even more challenging.
Women and girls in MENA faced numerous barriers to education, mobility, financial and asset control, and public leadership prior to the pandemic, and any positive gains made recently are at risk. They are impacted by losses in the informal labor market, elevated levels of violence and harassment, and increased burdens of caregiving for out-of-school children, sick and elderly family members.
Levels of psychosocial distress, already high in a volatile region are only escalating, with reductions in men’s roles as providers
being felt in a context of strict gender roles and stigmatization. The potential shift in men’s and boys’ role to provide increased
caregiving should be explored in contextually-appropriate manners. Read More...

Rapid Gender and Protection Assessment Report – Kobane Refugee Population, Suruc, Turkey

It is with a sense of optimism that we write this protection and gender report. With every day that the Syria crisis continues, it becomes more and more apparent that we can no longer work in siloes if the international community is going to be able to respond appropriately to the vast array of protection concerns we are facing in the region.

We write this report and subsequent recommendations:

(1) to help support the work of multiple agencies in strengthening their response, and providing services in ways which respect the different needs of women, men, boys and girls;
(2) to provide agencies with enough information to avoid doing harm;
(3) to ensure that actors are able to mitigate risk of SGBV and other protection concerns immediately. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis North West Syria (Idleb and Aleppo)

This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) focused on gendered work practices and attitudes, access to services, protection and coping mechanisms. Past research indicated that the role of women has been further marginalised during the protracted conflict and there was gap in information around gender dynamics, trends, roles and responsibilities and power dynamics in Idleb. Understanding these trends and patterns helps to inform program activities and procedures, including how to better target women and girls in ways that are safe, equitable, and empowering within the local context. Information about effective male engagement is also required to understand what actions and processes are useful to help reinforce the work of supporting women, elderly women and men and adolescent women and men during the protracted crisis.
The RGA focused on the Aleppo and Idleb Governorates in North West Syria. The objectives are focused on capturing the approach that has worked in reaching and supporting vulnerable women and men of different ages under the Water, Sanitation and Health (WASH), shelter, rapid response, cash for work / livelihoods and protection sectors; analyse the level, type and extent of changes that have occurred and are taking place as a result of conflict and displacement at household and community levels in relation to gender and power differentials (structure, relations and agency) and the reasons / factors behind those changes,; review the functionality of formal or informal support structures established for Gender Based Violence (GBV) survivors of any age and to develop a set of actionable recommendations, short and medium-term, based on key findings. Read More...

KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND PRACTICE SURVEY SOUTH EAST TURKEY

CARE International in Turkey began responding to the needs of Syrian refugees in Southern Turkey in October 2014. As of 27 November 2019, Turkey hosts 3,691,333 Syrian registered refugees, accounting for around 5% of total resident population in Turkey and over 365,000 refugees of other origins. Of that total, around 45.8% are females, with 21.4% of those female refugees are below the age of 18. A total of 62,216 individuals are hosted in 7 camps.

The impact of the now nine-year old conflict on Turkey’s economy, livelihoods, public infrastructure and services have been so profound that it is starting to affect inter-community cohesion. Off-camp refugees face several challenges linked to their ability to meet basic needs and are especially vulnerable to protection risks, forced to resort to negative coping mechanisms such as early marriage, child labour and reduction of meals since their original displacement.

CARE's experience in South East Turkey illustrated numerous gaps in access to services (education, health, legal), financial security, protection risks (child labour, sexual and GBV) and access to sufficient current information for the refugee population. Building on this CARE’s prior experience, we embarked on the Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP) Survey to provide additional context and aims to understand the changes in the community as a result of CARE’s protection programming.

The overall purpose of the KAP/base-line assessment is to provide valid reliable information focusing on Syrian refugees’ knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and behaviors related to some crucial topics such as; child/early/forced marriage; gender-based violence; child protection; information and access to services and sexual and reproductive health. Read More...

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