refugees

Rapid Gender Analysis Ukrainian Refugees in Poland

Poland has received the majority of Ukrainian refugees fleeing the conflict. At the time of writing, UNHCR reports that 1,830,711 people have crossed the Ukrainian/Polish border. There has been an outpouring of solidarity in Poland for the Ukrainian refugees. Polish authorities and citizens mobilised swiftly. For example, a law was passed to allow Ukrainians to stay in Poland for 18 months and receive an identification card that facilitates their access to cash assistance and services. Third country nationals (TCNs) have 15 days to find a way out of Poland. The sheer scale and pace of the refugee influx is already creating cracks in the response. Many of these cracks have important gender and protection consequences. This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) researched by CARE highlights the most significant gender and protection issues for Ukrainians in Poland and flags urgent actions required to address them. This RGA of Ukrainian Refugees in Poland builds on the RGA Brief for Ukraine published in February 2022. The RGA is based on observations from site visits to Medyka border crossing, Przemsyl train station, Korczowa Reception Centre, Krościenko border crossing as well as Warsaw train station and accommodation centres; conversations with organisers at these sites – both official and volunteers – and with refugees and Polish Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and Civil Society Organisations (CSOs). The RGA also benefits from consolidating and triangulating information coming out from multiple reports and online coordination meetings. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Ukraine

Like all military operations, this one will take its toll on many communities within Ukraine, with distinct effects on women, men, children and marginalised groups. The starkest example is the current contrast between the requirement that Ukrainian men aged 18 to 60 years stay and join the fighting, and media images of mostly women, children and the elderly fleeing the country.
Ukraine has made modest gains on women’s rights in recent years and has a developing state-level ‘gender machinery’. These gains were already under threat from deeply entrenched and persistent gender and discrimination-based inequalities, eight years of conflict in the east of the country, and the gendered social and economic stress wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic. This current crisis, with mass displacement inside and outside Ukraine, will add to that complex situation and put pressure on any gains that have been made.
Humanitarian actors need to build on the advances in gender equality and women’s empowerment by Ukrainian women’s rights, women-led and civil society organisations, and work with them to identify and respond to the different humanitarian needs of women, men, boys, girls and people of all genders. This Rapid Gender Analysis Brief for Ukraine and the Gender in Crisis Ukraine infographic are a first attempt to identify the gender, age, and diversity issues so that humanitarian responses can better meet people’s different needs as the crisis evolves. Read More...

IMPACT ASSESSMENT: CARE’s Psychosocial Support Program

As part of the CARE’s response under the Syria Regional Response Plan (3RP), CARE International in Jordan is providing Psycho Social Support (PSS) to refugee and Jordanian women, girls, boys, and men in urban areas and Azraq camp, covering the second and the third layers of IASC’s intervention pyramid; community and family supports and focused, non-specialized supports. The main purpose of the PSS program is to protect them from psychosocial distress, improve their emotional and social well-being, and strengthen their coping mechanisms and resilience.
With more than twenty-one Jordanian staff as of August 2021, according to CARE, the program has benefitted over 44,627 women, 17,936 girls, 19,265 boys, and 33,049 men including 94,421 refugees and 20,456 Jordanians to date. There are eight safe spaces at CARE’s community centers in urban areas (Amman, Mafraq, Zarqa, and Irbid) and Azraq camp.
This document presents the findings of a qualitative impact assessment that aims to explore the impact of the PSS interventions, including both intended and unintended impact on targeted beneficiaries. The Programs Quality (PQ) Department used the Outcome Harvesting participatory approach, which collects evidence of what has changed “outcomes” and, then, working backwards, ascertaining whether, how, and to what extent the intervention has contributed to these changes.
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ASHAR Alo Project (Action for Supporting the Host Communities: Adaptation and Resilience)

ASHAR Alo (Action for Supporting the Host Communities: Adaptation and Resilience), meaning ‘Light of Hope’ in Bangla.
The project activities are focused on Jaliyapalong, Haldiapalang,Ratna Palong, PalongKhali union of Ukhiya Upzila and Dakshin Mithachari and Chakmarkul union of Ramu Upazila. CARE aims to strengthen host communities' resilience by enhancing community-based disaster risk reduction (DRR), upgrading infrastructure, and providing livelihoods opportunities across shelter, settlement, and WASH sectors. The project also responds to the urgent protection and gender-based violence needs in the host community. Activities are being undertaken in collaboration with government and community stakeholders and UN and NGO actors.
Cox’s Bazar is amongst the poorest districts of Bangladesh. In Ukhia, 33% of people live below the poverty line, and 17% below extreme poverty. This is linked to the region's poor land quality and high risk of natural disaster. Since the Myanmar refugee influx in the fall of 2017, over 902,984 refugees or 201,150 households (HH)s have settled in Ukhiya, and Teknaf.1 Despite limited resources, the local host community population welcomed the arriving refugees during the fall of 2017, sharing food, shelter, and supplies. However, the refugees’ extended presence has strained the community’s already scarce resources. Within the sub-region, Ukhia and Teknaf have been particularly affected, with 336,000 residents directly impacted by the refugee influx,2 leading to a deterioration of relations between these host community members and the refugees.
The region is highly prone to natural disasters; it experiences regular cyclones, floods, and landslides with triple global average precipitation3. Both individual homes and community shelters are weak and in disrepair. Over 40% of households do not meet Sphere standards; they are overcrowded, fragile and highly susceptible to damage and destruction by strong winds, rain, and flooding4. Land degradation, including the daily removal of over 700 metric tons of firewood from the area, has led to a loss of topsoil, coupled with the heightened risk of flash flooding, which has increased the potential destruction5. The accumulation of improperly disposed waste and poor pre-existing drainage systems aggravate these risks and increase the likelihood of damage to host communities6. Furthermore, community response plans and structures are ill-equipped to safeguard or offer substantive protection. [19 pages] Read More...

IMPACT OF COV1D-19 ON WOMEN AND GIRLS IN ETHIOPIA

By August 9, 2021, Ethiopia had reported more than 284,000 COVID-19 cases and 4,426 deaths. Since COVID-19 was first reported in Ethiopia in March of 2021, the impacts of the pandemic, the measures taken to curb COVID-19, and additional political, economic, and environmental crises have severely impacted the population.

Women and girls bear different burdens in this crisis, and emergency responses often overlook the differences in impacts and needs for women, girls, men, and boys in humanitarian responses. To that end, this research— with funding from the EUTF (European Union Emergency Trust Fund) provides insight into the impact of COV1D-19 on women and girls in Ethiopia. This insight informs recommendations and guide EUTF partners and other relevant stakeholders in the areas of EUTF interventions. With this objective in mind, four woredas (administrative districts), one refugee camp, and one Industrial Park (IP) were considered as sample areas. These are Sekota Zuria and Gazgibla woredas in Wag Hemra zone of Amhara region; Moyale and Miyo woredas in Borena Zone of Oromia region, Asayita Refugee Camp in Afar region, and Bole-Lemi Industrial Park in Addis Ababa.

This research surveyed 372 women and girls in April 2021. The quantitative surveys covered adult women and girls over the age of 15. It also provides insights into the differences between refugees, Internally Displaced People (IDPs), refugees, and migrants. Qualitative from focus group discussions and key informant interviews also reflects opinions from men and boys. [75 pages] Read More...

PROMOTING SOLAR POWERED ENERGY EFFICIENT STOVES IN KYANGWALI REFUGEE SETTLEMENT PROJECT (PROSPERS)

This report presents the results of the baseline survey on the project “Promoting Solar Powered Energy Efficient Stoves in Kyangwali Refugee Settlement”. Kyangwali settlement is one of the eleven (11)1 refugee settlements in Uganda with a population of over 12,780 refugees who mainly come from DRC (118,390 refugees); South Sudan (3,383 refugees); Rwanda (1,124 refugees); Burundi (107 refugees); Kenya (11 refugees); Somali (7 refugees) and Sudan (2 refugees) (UNHCR, 2020). It is located in Kikuube district in Western Uganda bordered by DRC in the West, Hoima district in the North and Kagadi in the South.
This innovative clean energy project is being implemented by CARE International in Uganda in partnership with African Clean Energy (ACE) and Kabarole Research and Resource Centre (KRC) and is supported by the Dutch Relief Alliance Innovation Fund. It aims at improving the accessibility of quality and affordable clean energy solutions to refugees (particularly women) in the Kyangwali refugee settlement. The project’s innovative package includes two complementary programs namely; a) The User Referral Bonus (URB) model whereby the ACE package (ACE one stove + smart phone + solar powered lamp) will be made affordable to refugees in Kyangwali settlement and host communities, by allowing for payment in installments and also enabling URB participants to earn waivers on their monthly instalments through recommendation of peers; and b) Briquetting program whereby the first ten groups (farming cooperatives/VSLAs) which enroll at least half of their members into the URB will be supported with knowledge and equipment for clean, biomass briquette production, and also empowered to set up their own briquetting businesses. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis MENA – Turkey Program

In an effort to understand the differentiated needs and capacities of the vulnerable Syrian refugee groups affected by the Syrian Crisis residing in Southeast Turkey, CARE updated its Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) conducted in 2019. Turkey hosts the largest share of refugees in the world; 90% of whom are Syrian and have relocated to Turkey since the beginning of the Syrian crisis. A high majority (98%) of the Syrian refugees are residing in urban areas and many face difficulties in meeting their basic needs and adopt negative coping mechanisms such as early marriage, child labor, and illegal employment. Harmful cultural and traditional practices, coupled with the lack of livelihoods and self-reliance opportunities, perpetuate a situation of risk as many families see child marriage as the only way to secure a future for their children.
CARE continues to work to strengthen capacities, to provide targeted protection assistance, including in preventing and responding to GBV, providing protection responses including assessing legal and other specialized services and ensuring families have reduced exposure to safety and security concerns. The assistance provide would be more effective with having gender-based needs and capacities identified and addressed throughout the intervention. To analyze the gendered dimension of the Syrian Crisis in Turkey and update its 2019 RGA data on the changing roles of women, men, girls and boys as well as their needs, capacities and coping strategies, CARE conducted 396 household surveys, 3 Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and a review of secondary data. Read More...

Host Community Situation Analysis Impact of Rohingya Influx on Host Communities in Ukhia and Teknaf

Bangladesh became host to what is now the biggest refugee camp in the whole world. By November 2017 836,487 FDMN (Forcefully Displaced Myanmar Nationals) fled across the Myanmar-Bangladesh border to settle here mostly in two Upazilas:Ukhia and Teknaf of Cox's Bazar district. By January 2018, it became clear that this would be a prolonged crisis lasting years as the Myanmar government continued dithering about taking them back, and as also the FDMN expressed their unwillingness to go back fearing persecution. As a result of this huge and sudden influx, lives and livelihoods of the host communities have been affected in many ways. Therefore, this Situational Assessment aims to assess both the visible economic and the subtle social impacts of the recent influx on the host communities. Using Oxford’s integration conceptual framework, this assessment has been conducted to chalk out CARE Bangladesh’s future response to the refugee crisis by involving the host communities in the process and addressing their concerns so that the tension between the two communities is defused rather than intensified.
Presence of the refugees has brought about many social and economic changes creating massive pressure on the host communities. Economic activities in the two upazilas have gone through transitions, leading to the emergence of a new market system and reducing employment opportunities for the host communities.
On one hand prices of essentials have shot up almost twice as much, and on the other, due to an unpredictably large number of refugees entering the local labor market wages for day laborers have gone down. Though refugees are living in highly congested camps, they are getting aid materials as well as economic opportunity in the local market. On the contrary, the host communities are finding themselves pitted against the refugees as either their work have been taken away or their earnings significantly reduced. It is true that a few locally influential people owning large tracts of land and businesses are benefitting from the availability of cheap labor, but the poor and the ultra-poor from the host communities are bearing the brunt of these changes. Access to administrative, educational and healthcare needs has diminished. Reduced access and availability of CPR-resultant scarcity of timber, bamboo for shelter, food & cooking fuel created insecurity of accessing resources. Due to security risk of woman and girls mobility has goes down, women income earning opportunity getting reduced; all of this has evidently created tension between the host and the refugee communities and within host community households. If left unaddressed, this tension is likely to rise to the extent of creating potential threats of ethnic conflicts.
In response to these findings of the situational analysis possible types of interventions could be Gender specific livelihoods strengthening initiatives based on diversification of off/on farm activities, Transformative approach to build life free from GBV, Promoting youth leadership and Strengthening service delivery and demand side functions through Inclusive governance.
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WAYREP Baseline Report

WAYREP’s overall objective is to “Strengthen the resilience of refugee and Ugandan women, girls and youth to live a life free from violence (LFFV) in Uganda”. WAYREP focuses on women and girls’ empowerment within the context of some of Uganda’s most pressing current challenges such as rapid urbanization, regular and high rates of displacement and migration across and within Uganda’s borders and a very young and largely unemployed population. In 2020, this fragile context was further exacerbated with the outbreak of the Coronavirus pandemic (COVID 19) not only in terms of its health implications, but also in terms of its impact on livelihoods, safety and security. WAYREP is built on the hypothesis that Gender Based Violence (GBV) has two main drivers: gender inequality and poverty. This is exacerbated by displacement whether as a refugee or as an urban dweller coming from rural Uganda. WAYREP’s theory of change therefore states that: if refugee and vulnerable Ugandan women and girls have access to dignified livelihood opportunities, and if the gender, social and cultural norms that perpetuate GBV are challenged and minimized, then the likelihood of resorting to negative coping mechanisms - including GBV like early and forced marriage or commercial sex - will significantly reduce and women and girls’ self- reliance will increase.
The project seeks to achieve four result areas namely;
1. Enhanced sustainable and dignified livelihood for women and youth
2. Reduction of the acceptance of GBV
3. Enhanced psychosocial support to survivors of GBV
4. Increased accountability of the Government of Uganda (GoU) on the implementation of relevant
frameworks for women and girls’ protection and rights
The project is being implemented in Gulu Municipality (Pece and Bardege Divisions), Arua Municipality (River Oli Division, Omugo Settlement zones 4, 5, and 6) and Omugo Sub-county (in Obi, Angazi, Anufira, Duku, Boora and Ndapi Parishes).
This report is 81 pages long. Read More...

External ex-post evaluation of the “Multi-sectoral Protection Response for Vulnerable Populations in Ecuador affected by the Humanitarian Crisis” Project executed by CARE, Alas de Colibrí Foundation and Diálogo Diverso between 2019 and 2020

To respond to the migration crisis CARE Ecuador (CARE), Diálogo Diverso (DD) and Alas de Colibrí Fundation (ACF) associated to implement, with funding from the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) of the U.S. Department of State (that finances assistance actions for vulnerable refugee and migrant populations around the world), the “Multi-sectoral Protection Response for Vulnerable Populations in Ecuador affected by the Humanitarian Crisis” Project (PRM Project), from September 1, 2019 through August 31, 2020. The Project aimed at improving health and physical and psychological well-being of the forced-to-migrate Venezuelan population (and other nationalities), both migrants and refugees; as well as of the vulnerable local population, particularly LGBTIQ+ individuals and women survivors of gender-based violence, through a multi-sectoral intervention that includes: health care, legal and psychosocial advice, shelter, and comprehensive support interventions for the migrant humanitarian crisis. The project also generated advocacy actions to strengthen the capacities of public officials and institutions related to migratory processes, and to promote the restitution of migrants and refugees’ rights.
This report is 78 pages long. Read More...

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