Here in CARE International’s Evaluation e-Library we make all of CARE’s external evaluation reports available for public access in accordance with our Accountability Policy.

With these accumulated project evaluations CARE International hopes to share our collective knowledge not only internally but with a wider audience.

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Nepal Second Phase COVID-19 RGA

Nepal is currently undergoing the devastating effects of the second wave of COVID-19 pandemic. With the unprecedented surge in COVID-19 infections, the government of Nepal imposed prohibitory orders since April 29 in Kathmandu valley. Similarly, District Administration Offices (DAOs) in 75 out of 77 districts in the country have enforced prohibitory orders to break the chain of COVID-19 spread.1 As the country is reeling under the weight of increasing infections and death rates with fragile health infrastructure, there has been less attention to and evidence on gender and socio-economic impacts of the crisis on the most vulnerable and marginalized populations.
Global evidence from the previous year suggests that the pandemic led to disruption of social, political and economic systems and deepening of pre-existing gender and social inequalities. UN study 2020 highlights that the distribution of effect of any disaster or emergency correlates with the access to resources, capabilities, and opportunities which systematically make certain groups more vulnerable to the impact of emergencies, in particular women and girls.2 Women and girls in Nepal are particularly vulnerable to the immediate and long-term health and socio-economic impacts of the pandemic because of the pervasive inequalities in gender norms and structures.
The RGA conducted by CARE Nepal in partnership with Ministry of Women, Children and Senior Citizens (MoWCSC), UNWOMEN and Save the Children Women 2020 had shown that women’s unpaid care work and unequal division of labor were exacerbated because of closure of schools, public spaces, and care services. In addition, men’s loss of jobs and income and use of savings on gambling and alcohol had led to increased household conflict and women’s vulnerability to domestic violence. The study also revealed that 83 per cent of respondents lost their jobs; the hardest hit among them being women working as daily wage workers. The pandemic had also aggravated intimate partners and gender based violence for women and girls especially from marginalized groups such as Dalits, gender and sexual minorities (LGBTIQ++), women with disabilities, and adolescent girls. Read More...

Republic of Fiji Tropical Cyclone Josie and Tropical Cyclone Keni Rapid Gender, Protection and Inclusion Analysis

In early April 2018 TC Josie (Category 1) hit the western and central parts of Fiji causing flooding, particularly on the main island of Vitu Levu in the Western Division. One week later, on 10 April, Tropical Cyclone Keni passed close to Viti Levu as a Category 3 system overnight compounding the impact of TC Josie. In the Western Division, TCs Josie and Keni have affected an estimated 77,140 people while In the Northern division, 700 people are estimated to have been affected. The storm also affected the Eastern Division, particularly on Kadavu Island. There were 5 confirmed deaths1 and one report of a missing person2 from these events. Initial assessments report a total of 12,000 people sought shelter at 202 evacuation centres on the night of the storm in all divisions. As of 27 April, all evacuation centres in the Western and Northern Divisions were closed, while 21 evacuation centres were still in operation in Kadavu Province in the Eastern Division housing 476 evacuees3. Read More...

Solomon Islands Rennell Island Oil Spill Rapid Social Impact Assessment March 2019

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“Because She Is Important” Concrete Actions for Gender Equity in Rural WASH: Solomon Islands

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Gender and food security in Fiji A community-based gender analysis in Macuata Province, Vanua Levu

This report presents the results of a community-based gender and food security analysis that was carried out by ADRA Fiji in partnership with CARE International with funding from the WPHF, administered and supported by UN Women. The main purpose of the gender analysis is to gain a better understanding of the varying gender dynamics and socio-cultural contexts that can positively and negatively impact household and community food security and resilience in the context of climate change and disasters.
The findings and recommendations of the analysis are intended to strengthen the gender equality impacts of ADRA Fiji’s Vakarau Wai 1 Pro-Resilience Project, as well as inform the agency’s other programming. As part of the wider project the intention is also to more broadly share and discuss the findings to strengthen awareness among food security and livelihood stakeholders that localised social and gender context analysis is critical to ensure effective and sustainable food security in Fiji’s ever-changing climate environment and to also ensure food security and livelihoods (FSL) initiatives, foster gender equality and support women’s meaningful participation in decision-making in homes and communities across Fiji.
For this study data was collected and analysed from two communities, an iTaukei village and a settlement largely comprised of Fijians of Indian descent in Macuata Province, Vanua Levu. The aim was to identify gender specific needs, vulnerabilities and capacities, particularly among high risk and marginalised groups, and how these dimensions affect food security and household and community resilience and women’s empowerment. A total of 71 people (35 female and 36 males) ranging in age from 20 – 83 years old contributed their views for this study, including six people with impairments (four with difficulty walking and two with varying levels of visual impairment), as well as four widows and two widowers. Data was collected in relation to four core areas of inquiry namely: access to and control over resources, gender roles and divisions of labour, household decision-making, and participation in public decision-making, using focus group discussions and key informant interviews, along with several transect walks. Read More...

Gender Assessment Cash and Voucher Assistance Feasibility Study in the Solomon Islands

Feasibility study partner CARE Australia commissioned a qualitative gender-sensitive analysis to inform the overall development of the Solomon Islands Cash and Voucher Assistance (CVA) Feasibility Study. The gender analysis was conducted with the support of Oxfam, Save the Children, World Food Programme, CARE Australia, Live and Learn and World Vision with funding support from DFAT through the Australian Humanitarian Partnership (AHP) Disaster Ready Program. The study’s gender analysis is the first evidence produced in the Pacific region that examines the effect of CVA on women’s well-being and empowerment, aligned with the “Agenda for Collective Action” that was agreed following the Cash and Learning Partnership (CaLP) symposium on “Gender and Cash and voucher assistance” in Nairobi, Kenya in February 2018.

There is a growing body of research on the effects of cash and voucher assistance on protection and women’s empowerment outcomes in relation to development programming; however, less so in humanitarian settings and particularly relating to short-term CVA. Cash and voucher assistance is considered to be one of the most significant recent developments in humanitarian assistance, in addition to being poorly understood in some regions, including the Pacific. As a result, it is likely that many interventions fail to capitalize on opportunities to foster positive gender impacts or possibly lead to negative externalities, including gender-based violence affecting women and girls. For these reasons, the rise in CVA in humanitarian programming must be accompanied by an equal interest in ensuring CVA does not cause harm to women and girls or lead to a deterioration of gender relations in the home. It is important to undertake a gender analysis to understand context-specific gender norms and the implications of CVA on men, women, boys, girls, and other vulnerable groups in order to inform effective and high-quality programming. Read More...

Initial Rapid Gender Assessment Report Papua New Guinea 2015 El Niño

A Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) is designed to provide information about the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, girls and boys in a crisis. The objective of this RGA is to provide an overview of the gender relations between men, women, boys and girls in those Papua New Guinea’s highland provinces affected by drought and frost as a result of the 2015 El Niño event.
This initial gender analysis and subsequent recommendations will serve to inform CARE International in PNG’s (CARE PNG) programming response to the 2015 El Niño event in ways which respect the different needs of women, men, girls and boys in El Niño affected communities in Papua New Guinea. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Tropical Cyclone Winston

strongest storm ever recorded in the Southern Hemisphere. The damage caused by the TC Winston was extensive and has affected 167 of Fiji’s 300+ islands. Forty-three people lost their lives as a result of the cyclone. The Fiji Government estimates that 350,000 people—40% of the total population—have been affected by the cyclone. Of those affected, 120,000 are children under 18 years and 36,000 of these children are under 5 years of age.1 UNFPA estimates that 5,600 women in the affected areas are pregnant and 600 babies will be born per month in these areas over the next year.2 The total damages caused by Tropical Cyclone Winston are estimated to be US$460 million across a range of key sectors.
Women, men, boys and girls, and minority groups, will experience differing immediate and longer term impacts from Tropical Cyclone Winston. This Rapid Gender Analysis is intended to ensure these differing needs and priorities are taken into account in order to deliver an effective response that meets everyone’s needs. The analysis begins with an outline of gender equality and women’s empowerment in Fiji based principally on secondary data. This is followed by some of the potential gender-differentiated impacts in key sectors where Live and Learn and CARE will be working, along with initial recommendations to ensure Live and Learn and CARE implement a gender-responsive response to TC Winston. Response and recovery efforts will be considerably enriched as more data from affected areas becomes available and a detailed social and gender analysis is undertaken of the impacted areas and beneficiary communities Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Papua New Guinea – Highlands earthquake

Natural disasters, such as the earthquake that hit Papua New Guinea on the 26th of February are discriminatory events
affecting women, men, girls and boys differently. Drawing on precrisis information, the rapid analysis finds that women and girls are likely to be placed at particular risk due to their increased workload and caring responsibilities1. The destruction of the food gardens deprives women of family food but also of their main source of livelihood. Girls and women are also likely to face secondary gendered risks that result from the disaster, including increased domestic violence, sexual violence, forced marriage and accusations of sorcery. Structural gender inequalities and additional challenges in accessing health services are likely to further impair their sexual and reproductive health at a time when
they may be exposed to increased risks of unwanted pregnancies, STIs and HIV Aids. Inequalities at home may also
expose them to particular risks of food insecurity, eating least and last when food becomes scarce. Female-headed
households and widows require particular attention: With less bargaining power, scarce financial resources to purchase
essential goods and deprived of the required skills to rebuild their shelters, they are at increased risk of exploitation. The population displacement resulting from the earthquake is likely to generate tribal fights, bearing direct consequences on men’s security and indirect consequences for the rest of the community. Read More...

Cyclone Pam Vanuatu Rapid Gender Analysis

In the aftermath of Cyclone Pam, Vanuatu has declared a State of Emergency across all six provinces. Shelter, food, health and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) are key needs. The United Nations estimates that the majority of Vanuatu’s population, spread over 22 islands, has been affected by Tropical Cyclone Pam. Understanding the impact of Cyclone Pam on women, men, boys and girls is crucial to deliver an effective response.

CARE’s Rapid Gender Analysis of Cyclone Pam in Vanuatu analyses the different needs, capacities, and coping strategies of women, men, boys and girls. CARE’s Rapid Gender Analysis is built-up progressively; using a range of primary and secondary information to understand how gender roles and relations may change during a crisis. CARE’s Rapid Gender Analysis of Cyclone Pam, including its recommendations, will be revised as more information becomes available. Read More...

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