Poland

Localization in Practice: Realities from Women’s Rights and Women-Led Organizations in Poland

During the invasion of eastern Ukraine in 2014, violence against women and girls, especially intimate partner violence and sexual violence, increased rapidly. Since February 2022, the situation has deteriorated to alarming new levels. Exacerbated and pervasive violence against Ukrainian women and girls is a consequence of war, with women and girls continuing to be abused, exploited, and raped in Ukraine and while they flee to other countries. An increasing number of survivors are coming forward, buttressed by additional reports from women’s rights activists, service providers, humanitarian organizations, and UN agencies. As conflict in Ukraine pushes millions of women to seek refuge abroad, those leaving remain highly vulnerable to risks like trafficking, or may face sexual exploitation and abuse when seeking access to accommodation, transportation, or financial resources.

Women’s organizations in Poland, particularly those providing services to survivors of violence and working on women’s rights, are reporting more and more requests for assistance from sexual violence survivors inside Ukraine. Polish civil society has demonstrated their commitment and fitness to respond to the growing humanitarian needs, but the international community must step up with financial and technical support to ensure that a sustainable, localized approach can continue. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Ukrainian Refugees in Poland

Poland has received the majority of Ukrainian refugees fleeing the conflict. At the time of writing, UNHCR reports that 1,830,711 people have crossed the Ukrainian/Polish border. There has been an outpouring of solidarity in Poland for the Ukrainian refugees. Polish authorities and citizens mobilised swiftly. For example, a law was passed to allow Ukrainians to stay in Poland for 18 months and receive an identification card that facilitates their access to cash assistance and services. Third country nationals (TCNs) have 15 days to find a way out of Poland. The sheer scale and pace of the refugee influx is already creating cracks in the response. Many of these cracks have important gender and protection consequences. This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) researched by CARE highlights the most significant gender and protection issues for Ukrainians in Poland and flags urgent actions required to address them. This RGA of Ukrainian Refugees in Poland builds on the RGA Brief for Ukraine published in February 2022. The RGA is based on observations from site visits to Medyka border crossing, Przemsyl train station, Korczowa Reception Centre, Krościenko border crossing as well as Warsaw train station and accommodation centres; conversations with organisers at these sites – both official and volunteers – and with refugees and Polish Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and Civil Society Organisations (CSOs). The RGA also benefits from consolidating and triangulating information coming out from multiple reports and online coordination meetings. Read More...

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