Gender Based Violence

SISTEMATIZACIÓN DE LA ESTRATEGIA DE COMUNICACIÓN

Contribuir al fortalecimiento de un entorno protector para la población migrante venezolana que se encuentre en situación de vulnerabilidad

PROTECCIÓN: Las personas refugiadas y migrantes y solicitantes de asilo más vulnerables, especialmente, las mujeres y adolescentes que están expuestos a violaciones de derechos, incluida la trata de personas y la violencia basada en género, tienen un mayor acceso a servicios especializados de respuesta y prevención de protección

SALUD Y SALUD MENTAL: Las personas refugiadas, migrantes y solicitantes de asilo más vulnerables que están expuestas a la violencia basada en género y/o trata de personas tienen mayor acceso a la atención psicosocial y la atención de salud mental adaptada Read More...

Rapport d’évaluation finale du projet : Préserver la Dignité et Réduire les Souffrances des personnes affectées par les effets des mouvements de population dans la commune de N’guigmi II

Le projet PREDIRES II a été mis en de Septembre 2019 à Août 2020. Il est axé sur les volets sécurité alimentaire, Violence basée sur le genre et la santé sexuelle reproductive. Le projet a touché 500 ménages vulnérables issus de 9 villages de la commune de N’guigmi. Les activités réalisées vont de la mise en place et formation des structures communautaires de protection et VBG, des pairs éducateurs sur IST/VIH/SIDA à l’appui alimentaire et une mise en place, formation et appui en cash pour AGR des groupements MMD.
Pour mieux évaluer la pertinence, l’efficacité, l’efficience et l’impact du projet, une évaluation finale a été faite, objet du présent rapport. L’évaluation a été conduite en interne et le plus simplement possible par le chef de projet. L’exercice a été guidé par 05 questions d’évaluation avec un certain nombre de sous-questions. Les méthodes de collectes ont été une revue documentaire du projet et une étude qualitative (enquête des connaissances, d’attitudes et des pratiques). Pour cette dernière, des entretiens de groupe ont été menés avec des hommes (jeunes et adultes) et femmes (jeunes et adultes). Les données ont été collectées par une équipe externes dans 3 villages d’intervention du projet. Le projet est à 63% du taux de consommation en Juillet 2020. [14 pages] Read More...

ASHAR Alo Project (Action for Supporting the Host Communities: Adaptation and Resilience)

ASHAR Alo (Action for Supporting the Host Communities: Adaptation and Resilience), meaning ‘Light of Hope’ in Bangla.
The project activities are focused on Jaliyapalong, Haldiapalang,Ratna Palong, PalongKhali union of Ukhiya Upzila and Dakshin Mithachari and Chakmarkul union of Ramu Upazila. CARE aims to strengthen host communities' resilience by enhancing community-based disaster risk reduction (DRR), upgrading infrastructure, and providing livelihoods opportunities across shelter, settlement, and WASH sectors. The project also responds to the urgent protection and gender-based violence needs in the host community. Activities are being undertaken in collaboration with government and community stakeholders and UN and NGO actors.
Cox’s Bazar is amongst the poorest districts of Bangladesh. In Ukhia, 33% of people live below the poverty line, and 17% below extreme poverty. This is linked to the region's poor land quality and high risk of natural disaster. Since the Myanmar refugee influx in the fall of 2017, over 902,984 refugees or 201,150 households (HH)s have settled in Ukhiya, and Teknaf.1 Despite limited resources, the local host community population welcomed the arriving refugees during the fall of 2017, sharing food, shelter, and supplies. However, the refugees’ extended presence has strained the community’s already scarce resources. Within the sub-region, Ukhia and Teknaf have been particularly affected, with 336,000 residents directly impacted by the refugee influx,2 leading to a deterioration of relations between these host community members and the refugees.
The region is highly prone to natural disasters; it experiences regular cyclones, floods, and landslides with triple global average precipitation3. Both individual homes and community shelters are weak and in disrepair. Over 40% of households do not meet Sphere standards; they are overcrowded, fragile and highly susceptible to damage and destruction by strong winds, rain, and flooding4. Land degradation, including the daily removal of over 700 metric tons of firewood from the area, has led to a loss of topsoil, coupled with the heightened risk of flash flooding, which has increased the potential destruction5. The accumulation of improperly disposed waste and poor pre-existing drainage systems aggravate these risks and increase the likelihood of damage to host communities6. Furthermore, community response plans and structures are ill-equipped to safeguard or offer substantive protection. [19 pages] Read More...

The Safe Service for Minority Population (SSMP) Project 2019-2021

This is the End of Project Evaluation Report for Safe Services for Minority Populations (SSMP) Project which was implemented in Ratanak Kiri province- Banlung, Oyadav, and Andong Meas districts. The Project was funded by the Australia-Cambodia Cooperation for Equitable Sustainable Services (ACCESS). It started on 30 September 2019 and will end on 30 September 2021 (following a no cost extension). The goal of the project was for Persons with disabilities and women affected by GBV benefit from access to sustainable, quality, inclusive services
In order to conduct the evaluation, data was collected through a comprehensive literature review and fieldwork. The literature review was conducted reviewing reports and documents from the SSMP Project and also other relevant external publications. Field work was conducted in August 2021. The interview questions were based on the CARE’s monitoring and evaluation tools and updated to capture information needed for the Evaluation Read More...

IMPACT OF COV1D-19 ON WOMEN AND GIRLS IN ETHIOPIA

By August 9, 2021, Ethiopia had reported more than 284,000 COVID-19 cases and 4,426 deaths. Since COVID-19 was first reported in Ethiopia in March of 2021, the impacts of the pandemic, the measures taken to curb COVID-19, and additional political, economic, and environmental crises have severely impacted the population.

Women and girls bear different burdens in this crisis, and emergency responses often overlook the differences in impacts and needs for women, girls, men, and boys in humanitarian responses. To that end, this research— with funding from the EUTF (European Union Emergency Trust Fund) provides insight into the impact of COV1D-19 on women and girls in Ethiopia. This insight informs recommendations and guide EUTF partners and other relevant stakeholders in the areas of EUTF interventions. With this objective in mind, four woredas (administrative districts), one refugee camp, and one Industrial Park (IP) were considered as sample areas. These are Sekota Zuria and Gazgibla woredas in Wag Hemra zone of Amhara region; Moyale and Miyo woredas in Borena Zone of Oromia region, Asayita Refugee Camp in Afar region, and Bole-Lemi Industrial Park in Addis Ababa.

This research surveyed 372 women and girls in April 2021. The quantitative surveys covered adult women and girls over the age of 15. It also provides insights into the differences between refugees, Internally Displaced People (IDPs), refugees, and migrants. Qualitative from focus group discussions and key informant interviews also reflects opinions from men and boys. [75 pages] Read More...

Every Voice Counts Programme

In 2020 after COVID 19 restrictions were relaxed, a CSC Meeting in October 2020 was organized at District Mirpurkhas and Umerkot with community and government departments to discuss gender related issues and to review and develop action plans regarding the inclusiveness of communities in government level decision making. It also worked on getting the District Gender Forums activated in Districts Mirpurkhas and Umerkot for effective district public authorities and community representatives, participation included local government, district administration, police, health and education department endorsed that they will continue this forum with the support of Social Welfare Department and other civil society organizations. The civil society organization showed their interest to continue Gender Forum activities in Mirpurkhas and Umerkot against Child Marriages and Domestic Violence.

Two trainings of Union Council Secretaries of both Districts have been conducted during this reporting month, on the Sindh Child Marriage Restraint Act 2013, the mandate of the local government department and the role of the union council secretaries to register marriages, births, nikkahs and nikkah registrar and pundits as per the laws. More than 90 union council secretaries of both district actively participated in the trainings. Regional Director and Additional Directors of Umerkot and Mirpurkhas concluded the training and distributed the certificates among the participants in a closing ceremony. [13 pages] Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Sofala – Beira

On the 23rd of January 2021 Tropical Cyclone Eloise made its landfall, in central Mozambique.. Over 441,686 people were affected, with 43,327 persons being displaced (the Instituto Nacional de Gestão Reduçãodo Risco de Desastres (INGD).) The storm also destroyed farmland, infrastructure and thousands of homes. Most of the areas hit by Cyclone Eloise were the same areas affected by Cyclone Idai less than two years ago and hit by tropical storm Chalane on 30 December 2020. CARE conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis from the 12th to the 18th of February in three of the affected districts in Sofala Province, Beira (with the focus on Inhamizua, IFAPA accommodation center, and Chipangara) Nhamatanda (with focus on Tica, and Jhon Segredo Accommodation center), and Buzi (with focus on Guara-Guara), at the transit centers, resettlement sites, and catchment areas. About 56 364 houses were totally or partially destroyed, others flooded, forcing some families to shelter with host families. Others families had been evacuated from flooded areas and were staying in crowded temporary accommodation. Those that were staying in accommodation centers had lost most of their resources, and were dependent on government for daily provision. Read More...

RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS ON THE IMPACT OF THE CORONAVIRUS ON GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE IN FOUR DISTRICTS OF ZAMBIA

Pandemics and outbreaks have differential impacts on women, men, girls and boys. From risk of exposure and biological susceptibility to infection to the social and economic implications, individuals’ experiences are likely to vary according to their biological and gender characteristics and their interaction with other social determinants (UNWomen, 2020). Because of this, global and national strategic plans for COVID-19 preparedness and response must be grounded in strong gender analysis and must ensure meaningful participation of affected groups, including women and girls, in decision-making and implementation.

The Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) was conducted in the four districts of Lusaka, Kalomo, Mpika, and Katete. A mixed method approach was employed to gather data from men, women, boys and girls on the impact of Covid-19 on Gender Based Violence (GBV), health, nutrition and water, sanitation and hygiene. Read More...

Addressing Gender-Based Sexual Harassment in the Workplace in Vietnam and Cambodia

Purpose: This final evaluation aims to build an impact assessment of the sexual harassment prevention (SHP) package in the targeted suppliers of Primark in Vietnam. In particular, the final evaluation aims to assess the appropriateness and the effectiveness of interventions of the SHP package and review the possibility and lesson learnt to scale up the SHP intervention to other suppliers of Primark in Vietnam.

Methods: The study employed a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods. Regarding qualitative methods, the study organised and collected information from 2 focus group discussions (FGD) with the Sexual Harassment Committee (SHPC) members, 6 in-depth-Interview with leaders and workers, the four most significant change stories and a program reflection workshop. The quantitative method was a survey with a sample of 196 employees working in the targeted factories. [76 pages]

Main findings: The intervention package of the project had 3 major domains of activities which included training and advocacy to leaders and managers of the factories participating in the project on SHP, supporting the factories to develop and implement SHP mechanisms, and awareness-raising and behaviour change campaigns. The project’s activities that focus on training and advocacy for the targeted factories’ leaders and managers had promoted them to proactively participate in address sexual harassment in their factories. The factory management board had publicly shown their commitment to implement the established SH prevention policies and actively participating in implementing all the project activities and creating role models at the forefront of good practice performance. Also, the findings of this evaluation show significant improvements in behaviours and the capacities of SHPC members and resource persons regarding implementing SHP activities and SH case handling. Read More...

Gendered Violence Research Network: Enhancing Women’s Voice to STOP Sexual Harassment Final Evaluation – Vietnam

CARE Australia, through its partner CARE Country Offices (COs), has been working to prevent and address the issue of sexual harassment in mainland Southeast Asia’s garment sector since 2017. STOP is funded by CARE Australia and the Australian Government through the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s Australian NGO Cooperation Program (ANCP) and the Gender Action Platform (GAP).

STOP is aligned with CARE International’s organisational remit of working in gender transformative ways to cultivate gender equality and justice and uses an adapted version of the World Health Organisation’s ‘socio-ecological model of violence prevention.

STOP’s key objectives can be summarised as follows:
1. To support garment factories in developing effective workplace mechanisms to respond to sexual harassment.
2. To make female garment factory workers feel safe enough to report sexual harassment, and through engagement with garment factories, enable them to do so without negative consequences.
3. To strengthen the national regulatory environment to promote laws, policies and mechanisms to address sexual harassment in the workplace. STOP works with participating factories to implement STOP’s Workplace Sexual Harassment Prevention Package (WSHPP) to create workplaces where female workers feel safe and experience less sexual harassment. This is achieved using a ‘social norms approach’ at the individual, factory, and societal levels. [32 pages] Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all