Gender Assessment

CONEX Balkan Project Rapid Gender Analysis Report Western Balkan Region – Albania, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Kosovo, Montenegro, North Macedonia, and Serbia

CONEX is a regional project implemented in six Balkan countries designed to support the marginalized groups of people in the targeted communities that have suffered the most during the Covid-19 crisis, namely the elderly, unemployed women, minorities, refugees, internally displaced persons (IDPs) and persons with disabilities to transition from relief to recovery and onwards to development.
The Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) has been conducted to provide essential information about gender issues and concerns that should be addressed and will not only be used to define concrete action points and possible adaptations of project design but also as a learning tool and advocacy platform with national NGO networks and local/national authorities. The RGA objectives are to:
 Assess the ways and the extent to which women and other vulnerable groups are affected by social and economic deprivation due to consequences of the COVID-19 crisis;
 Explore how the prevailing gender norms and roles relate to the project activities and objectives, in particular with regard to the access to information, ability to access services, employment and effects of gender based violence (GBV) and
 Increase the gender analysis and integration related capacities of project staff (gender-sensitization, RGA data collection training).
The RGA was conducted in the period May-October 2021 and consisted of three main segments facilitated by the CARE team: 1. Capacity building of partners on gender and how to conduct the RGA; 2. Coordination of data collection, analysis, and validation 3. RGA report writing.
In total, 28 implementing partners’ staff members from nine organizations in 21 locations in six target countries organized and facilitated 53 events (focus group discussions - FGDs and key informant interviews -KIIs) during which they directly talked to 195 persons (66% female), 21% ethnic minority (Roma and Ashkali), over 29% persons from rural areas and 11% persons with disabilities – PWD. Read More...

HAFORSA 2 BASELINE Supplementary baseline to support gender indicators.

This baseline survey was conducted by the Gender and Program Quality team of CARE International in Timor-Leste from 14th – 17th September 2021 in the Admin post of Atsabe, Municipality of Ermera. This is a qualitative-based survey and used the Social Analysis and Action (SAA) tools with the objective of collecting information from the farmer groups through a participative Focus Group Discussion (FGDs). The tools were used to analyze the situation related to the roles and responsibilities at home including the decision-making process between women and men, and to understand women’s participation, and their ability to engage in development programs within their community area. Read More...

Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection Project (SWEEP) Gender Assessment II

East and West Belesa woredas (districts) are located in the central Gondar zone of Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia. The people of East and West Belesa woredas are dependent on subsistence farming and rain fed agriculture in a context of recurrent drought and severe land degradation. The overwhelming majority live in extreme poverty and face food shortages as a result of the frequent shocks these conditions expose them to. The condition is more devastating for women, girls and marginalized households – for example, female-headed households and households including persons with disability who are often excluded from social and economic entitlements.
CARE, with the financial support from the Austrian Development Agency (ADA) and funds from Austrian Development Cooperation (ADC) has implemented a three years' (October 2017 to September 2020 – then extended to February 2021) project titled "Water for Food Security, Women's Empowerment and Environmental Protection (SWEEP)" to address the socio-economic and environmental problems causing food insecurity in 20 kebeles of east and west Belesa woredas. The project was implemented by CARE in collaboration with local government, communities and universities. To increase the resilience of households, the SWEEP project followed an integrated and holistic project implementation approach, which put marginalized people at the center.
At the end of the project period, a gender assessment was conducted to see and capture the changes in the lives of women; especially the results of the women empowerment and the social norms change components of the project. Findings from the Rapid Gender Assessment (May 2017) and In-depth gender Assessment (May 2018) were used as a baseline to compare the before and after situation of women in the community. This report is prepared to share the findings of the end line gender assessment II, which was conducted between December 14 and 23, 2020. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Latin America & the Caribbean – Ciudad Juárez, Mexico

Asylum seekers and migrants traveling through Central America and Mexico to the U.S. border face a range of risks, but women, girls, and other vulnerable groups—such as members of the LGBTQIA community—are confronted with additional threats to their health, safety, and well-being in their countries of origin, countries of transit, and in the U.S. As a result, asylum seekers and migrants who arrive at the U.S.–Mexico border often carry a heavy burden of trauma from experiences with violence. The lack of a system to appropriately support people on the move deepens pre-existing inequalities and exposes already vulnerable groups to additional, unnecessary, risks.
The U.S. Government’s Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), also known as the “Remain in Mexico” policy, returns asylum seekers and migrants from U.S. custody to Mexican territory, compelling them to face months of risk and uncertainty as they wait to complete their asylum processes. The asylum process itself is challenging and unclear, liable to change without warning, and largely opaque to affected populations. The asylum seekers and migrants waiting in Mexico’s Ciudad Juárez city, along the Mexico–U.S. border, face ever-present threats of extortion, gender-based violence (GBV), and kidnappings, which compound their trauma and restrict their freedom of movement and access to critical resources and services. Trauma and fear were the norm of the population that CARE surveyed, not the
exception.
The female asylum-seekers and migrants in Ciudad Juárez that CARE spoke with reported feeling profoundly vulnerable and isolated. They consistently relayed a lack of trust in authorities and an increasing level of anti-migrant sentiment in the city. The lack of either confidential GBV screenings or formal complaint mechanisms left survivors with almost no one to turn to for support and services. Asylum seeking and migrant women, girls, and LGBTQIA individuals who feared for their safety reported remaining inside shelters as much as possible, leaving only when absolutely necessary. In Ciudad Juárez, some asylum seekers and migrants have found refuge in overwhelmed and
underfunded informal shelters. These shelters are largely run by local faith-based organizations, and could meet only a fraction of the need. Despite these efforts, the humanitarian response to the migration crisis is characterized by a haphazard and uncoordinated approach that is devoid of reference to the humanitarian standards that would be the norm in other emergencies. The shelters did not have appropriate intake procedures, such as vulnerability screenings. Few had sufficient water and sanitation facilities for the number of residents, and many shelters housed residents together in common spaces regardless of age or gender, amplifying the risk of harm to vulnerable persons. Asylum seekers and migrants in the shelters frequently lacked information about available health and legal services. Read More...

A STUDY ON THE IMPACT OF COV1D-19 ON WOMEN AND GIRLS IN ETHIOPIA

By August 9, 2021, Ethiopia had reported more than 284,000 COVID-19 cases and 4,426 deaths. Since COVID-19 was first reported in Ethiopia in March of 2021, the impacts of the pandemic, the measures taken to curb COVID-19, and additional political, economic, and environmental crises have severely impacted the population.
Women and girls bear different burdens in this crisis, and emergency responses often overlook the differences
in impacts and needs for women, girls, men, and boys in humanitarian responses. To that end, this research—
with funding from the EUTF (European Union Emergency Trust Fund) provides insight into the impact of COV1D-19 on women and girls in Ethiopia. This insight informs recommendations and guide EUTF partners and other relevant stakeholders in the areas of EUTF interventions. With this objective in mind, four woredas (administrative districts), one refugee camp, and one Industrial Park (IP) were considered as sample areas. These are Sekota Zuria and Gazgibla woredas in Wag Hemra zone of Amhara region; Moyale and Miyo woredas in Borena Zone of Oromia region, Asayita Refugee Camp in Afar region, and Bole-Lemi Industrial Park in Addis Ababa.
This research surveyed 372 women and girls in April 2021. The quantitative surveys covered adult women and girls over the age of 15. It also provides insights into the differences between refugees, Internally Displaced People (IDPs), refugees, and migrants. Qualitative from focus group discussions and key informant interviews also reflects opinions from men and boys. Read More...

DE GÉNERO EN HONDURAS ANÁLISIS RÁPIDO Un panorama ante COVID-19 y Eta / Iota

La población hondureña, multiétnica y esencialmente femenina (51.7%), cohabita en un país que ha sido catalogado como uno de los países del área latinoamericana con mayor desigualdad en cuanto al desarrollo (Índice de desigualdad de género de 0.479 versus un IDH 0.611), y con una brecha de género de 27.8 %, según el Foro Económico Mundial. Esta condición de desigualdad afecta especialmente a las mujeres y niñas, pero también a la población viviendo en situación de pobreza, y a la población que está expuesta a alguna condición de vulnerabilidad ya sea física, psicológica, social, ambiental, económica o estructural.
Como resultado, esta población vive en condiciones de pobreza y desigualdad que influyen directamente en la profundización de aspectos relacionados con la feminización de la pobreza; las limitaciones en el acceso a servicios básicos, recursos, oportunidades económicas y empleo digno (medios de vida); la vulnerabilidad ante la violencia, especialmente la Violencia Basada en Género (VBG); y la continuidad en la brecha de género que existe en cuanto a la participación a nivel organizativo o político.
Esta situación ha sido agravada por las circunstancias generadas en Honduras por la pandemia de la COVID_19, que ha registrado 164,495 casos a nivel nacional, y por la devastación causada por Eta e Iota —que afectó a más de 4 millones de personas—, y que han dejado al descubierto las condiciones de violencia y vulnerabilidad a las que están expuestas las mujeres y niñas en Honduras.
Entre los efectos adversos provocados por ambas crisis, preocupa especialmente aquellos que afectarán a indicadores o condiciones estructurales relacionados con la feminización de la pobreza o que inciden directamente en los factores de riesgo o protectores para la violencia basada en género. Read More...

Análisis Rápido de Género ETA e IOTA Guatemala, diciembre 2020

La situación que enfrenta Guatemala en la actualidad es de una complejidad enorme. Aparte de las condiciones de desigualdad histórica y altos niveles de pobreza que marcan la realidad del país, desde marzo de 2020 se ha tenido que enfrentar los impactos de la pandemia de COVID, y recientemente las emergencias generadas por las tormentas ETA e IOTA, que han azotado a gran parte del territorio nacional. El país se encuentra en una situación excepcional de emergencia sobre emergencia y en donde las acciones de prevención y respuesta han resultado insuficientes para la magnitud de la tragedia.
ONU Mujeres y CARE Guatemala, como parte del Grupo de Trabajo de Género en la Acción Humanitaria del Equipo Humanitario País (EHP), consideran esencial aportar información que permita entender la situación que enfrentan las poblaciones afectadas, y en especial, información con análisis de género, que permita reconocer el impacto diferenciado en las mujeres y niñas, identificando sus necesidades específicas para fortalecer los esfuerzos de mitigación y recuperación, así como para asegurar una respuesta efectiva que garantice sus derechos. Es por ello que realizan este Análisis Rápido de Género (RGA por sus sigla en inglés), como una herramienta para la orientación de la respuesta humanitaria a las tormentas ETA e IOTA, y en el marco de la pandemia de COVID 19.
Objetivo: Identificar y analizar las afectaciones, necesidades e impactos de la emergencia generada por la tormenta ETA en la situación de las mujeres y niñas en Guatemala, y proporcionar recomendaciones prácticas para el trabajo de respuesta y recuperación; cubriendo las áreas más afectadas por la tormenta y priorizadas por CARE y ONU Mujeres, que son los departamentos de Alta Verapaz, Baja Verapaz, Izabal, Chiquimula, Quiché, Huehuetenango, Jalapa, Zacapa y Petén. Read More...

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE GENDERED EFFECTS OF THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC ON HOUSEHOLDS

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is arguably one of the biggest pandemics to hit the world in recent times. It began in Wuhan, China and within a span of a few months took a toll on all the countries. A pandemic of such magnitude was witnessed when the 1918 flue pandemic started in Europe, spreading to United States of America, Asia and later to the rest of the world. Globally, the pandemic has affected the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Governments across the world, including Kenya, have taken up different containment measures including introduction of economic stimulus programs to cushion women and men, girls and boys and the economy at large, from the devastating effects of the pandemic. In Kenya, the pandemic and its associated containment measures resulted in unprecedented effects on the country’s economic and social outcomes such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and people’s well-being with a disproportionate burden falling on women and girls. This report analyses the gendered socio-economic effects of COVID-19 and provides policy recommendations that will guide responses, interventions and recovery plans for COVID-19 in Kenya. Specifically, the report assesses the effect of COVID-19 on: incomes including remittances; food security; education; unpaid care and domestic work; access to healthcare services; access to sexual and reproductive health services; access to social protection; access to water and sanitation services; gender-based violence (GBV) due to restrictions associated with COVID-19, and the prevention and response mechanisms. The analysis in this report is informed by primary data collected from a sample of 2,587 individuals from all the 47 counties in Kenya between 4th August and 8th September 2020 using Computer Assisted Telephonic Interviews (CATI). Due to the sensitivity of GBV information and the need to uphold the privacy of respondents in the survey, a separate SMS-based survey was conducted. Two questionnaires were administered to a sample of 2,482 individuals drawn across all the 47 counties in Kenya. The same individuals were interviewed at different times with the duration of each interview lasting not longer than 20 minutes. A total of 34 Key Informant Interviews (KIIs), that is 19 women and 15 men, were conducted from both State and non-State actors to complement and triangulate the findings from the individual/ household data while drawing more insights on the effects and recovery plans from the pandemic. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Sofala – Beira

On the 23rd of January 2021 Tropical Cyclone Eloise made its landfall, in central Mozambique.. Over 441,686 people were affected, with 43,327 persons being displaced (the Instituto Nacional de Gestão Reduçãodo Risco de Desastres (INGD).) The storm also destroyed farmland, infrastructure and thousands of homes. Most of the areas hit by Cyclone Eloise were the same areas affected by Cyclone Idai less than two years ago and hit by tropical storm Chalane on 30 December 2020. CARE conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis from the 12th to the 18th of February in three of the affected districts in Sofala Province, Beira (with the focus on Inhamizua, IFAPA accommodation center, and Chipangara) Nhamatanda (with focus on Tica, and Jhon Segredo Accommodation center), and Buzi (with focus on Guara-Guara), at the transit centers, resettlement sites, and catchment areas. About 56 364 houses were totally or partially destroyed, others flooded, forcing some families to shelter with host families. Others families had been evacuated from flooded areas and were staying in crowded temporary accommodation. Those that were staying in accommodation centers had lost most of their resources, and were dependent on government for daily provision. Read More...

RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS ON THE IMPACT OF THE CORONAVIRUS ON GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE IN FOUR DISTRICTS OF ZAMBIA

Pandemics and outbreaks have differential impacts on women, men, girls and boys. From risk of exposure and biological susceptibility to infection to the social and economic implications, individuals’ experiences are likely to vary according to their biological and gender characteristics and their interaction with other social determinants (UNWomen, 2020). Because of this, global and national strategic plans for COVID-19 preparedness and response must be grounded in strong gender analysis and must ensure meaningful participation of affected groups, including women and girls, in decision-making and implementation.

The Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) was conducted in the four districts of Lusaka, Kalomo, Mpika, and Katete. A mixed method approach was employed to gather data from men, women, boys and girls on the impact of Covid-19 on Gender Based Violence (GBV), health, nutrition and water, sanitation and hygiene. Read More...

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