Resilience

Somalia Resilience Program (SomRep) Endline Assessment

The Somalia Resilience Program (SomReP) is intended to enhance the resilience of vulnerable households and communities in Southern Somalia against cyclical shocks and stressors. SomReP is a consortium of seven international non-governmental organisations (INGOs). The program’s activities focus on improving livelihoods and increasing adaptive capacities of communities and households in Somalia.
On behalf of SomReP, Forcier Consulting is conducting Third Party Monitoring (TPM) of the program in two districts in South Central Somalia: Baidoa, Bay Region and Afgooye, Lower Shabelle Region. This document represents the initial main findings of the end line of the TPM. The end line report will report trends in program results after the program’s completion. Further, the status of the indicators will be compared to the baseline and midline values.
The data collection for this midline study was collected in August 2019. All data was collected, cleaned, and analysed by Forcier Consulting. Analyses compare midline and baseline data to end line results to identify trends among the results. This report follows the structure of the midline and baseline assessments, which was conducted by Forcier Consulting in 2017 and 2018.
A total of 1,590 program beneficiaries were surveyed, including 58% female and 42% male respondents. Respondents were sampled in urban/peri-urban, pastoral, agro-pastoral, and IDP livelihood zones. The vast majority of respondents were household heads, with an average age of 37 years. A large majority of participants had attended madrasa only (70%), and the average household size was 4.3 members.
Overall, the findings are positive for many program areas, however conditions varied over the period of the study; there was some recovery from the very severe 2016/2017 drought in 2018, but deterioration into 2019. These poor conditions created challenges for program beneficiaries. As a result, the analyses in the end line study show some mixed results. One limitation of the study is that the negative effects of the drought cannot be differentiated from the positive effects of the program. Read More...

Supporting flood Forecast-based Action and Learning (SUFAL) Project in the 2020 Monsoon Floods

Background: ‘Supporting flood Forecast-based Action and Learning’ (SUFAL) project was designed to contribute to reducing the adverse impacts of the increasing frequency of catastrophic flooding on the vulnerable and poor communities through Forecast-based Action (FbA). The project was funded by The Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO) and was implemented through a consortium led by CARE Bangladesh, with Concern Worldwide, Islamic Relief and Regional Integrated Multi-Hazard Early Warning System for Africa and Asia (RIMES). The project was implemented in three northern districts of Bangladesh: Jamalpur, Gaibandha, and Kurigram. FbA contributed to disseminating Flood Early Warning messages with a lead time of 10 – 15 days with timely and accurate weather forecast information, while and it also helping to identify potential flooding areas.

Methodology: The primary purpose of the study was to “Evaluate the impact of early actions” applied through the SUFAL project on household and community beneficiaries in responding to the 2020 monsoon floods. Customized OECD-DAC criteria, Quasi-experimental design (Difference-in-Difference Method), Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) framework and Value for Money (VfM) framework were used as guiding methods and tools to design study instruments and evaluate the impact of early actions at every stakeholder level. The study covered a control group in non-project areas and three treatment groups in the project areas: Treatment group 1 (EWM support), Treatment group 2 (EWM + Evacuation + Shelter + WASH support), Treatment group 3 (EWM + Evacuation + Shelter + WASH + Cash-grant support). Treatment groups were categorized in three different groups to conduct cost-effectiveness analysis. The study areas were in the districts of Kurigram (Hatia, Begumganj, Buraburi, Shaheber Alga unions), Gaibandha (Bharatkhali, Saghata, Ghuridaha, Haldia unions) and Jamalpur (Kulkandi, Chinaduli, Noarpara, Shapdhor. The survey sample consisted of 224 control respondents (of which 153 were women) and 754 treatment respondents (of which 426 were women), among which Sample for treatment group 1, 2, and 3 were 293 (100 women), 292 (192 women) and 169 (134 women), respectively. A total of 118 of the 754 treatment households interviewed through the survey were women-headed households and 38 out of 224 control group households were women headed households. The team had conducted 7 FGDs with community members in the three implementation areas, and 27 KIIs with community volunteers, project staff, government officials, and other related NGOs.

Impact: It was found through the study that less people in treatment group experienced damages compared to control households, treatment households saved more resources in 2020 than control households, and the average monetary values of assets saved by treatment group in 2020 were higher compared to the control group households. Due to the drawn-out duration and intensity of the flood in 2020, respondents reported that they were not able to prevent more damages although they took more early actions. Besides, treatment areas were the most flood affected areas. The early messages had helped the community to prevent damage to their assets and livelihoods. The percentage of damage prevented in agricultural sector for the treatment group had increased to 28% since the flood of 2019. The damage prevented in fisheries had increased significantly by 18 percent in 2020 in compared to that of 2019. The death of family members from waterborne diseases had decreased (except female members) in comparison to the previous flood in 2019. It is quite evident that the early warning message had enabled the males to take early actions regarding relocation of the vulnerable
family members to higher grounds, relative’s houses, or to the shelters. The cash for work modality had also helped the community people to obtain a source of income by working for the embankment, roads, bamboo bridges, etc. Shelter renovations and upgradations reportedly encouraged the community people to evacuate faster. The average amount of loan taken by a treatment respondent and control respondent was found to have been Taka 20,194 and Taka 18,335 respectively. However, post flood loan burden was significantly less for the cash grant recipients (only 32% took loan after flood) as compared to other treatment groups (more than 50% took loan). The
cash grants are said to have helped the recipients address their basic needs during the flood and also helped them to some extent to repair their house and pay for livestock treatment after the flood. [70 pages] Read More...

PROMOTING SOLAR POWERED ENERGY EFFICIENT STOVES IN KYANGWALI REFUGEE SETTLEMENT PROJECT (PROSPERS)

This report presents the results of the baseline survey on the project “Promoting Solar Powered Energy Efficient Stoves in Kyangwali Refugee Settlement”. Kyangwali settlement is one of the eleven (11)1 refugee settlements in Uganda with a population of over 12,780 refugees who mainly come from DRC (118,390 refugees); South Sudan (3,383 refugees); Rwanda (1,124 refugees); Burundi (107 refugees); Kenya (11 refugees); Somali (7 refugees) and Sudan (2 refugees) (UNHCR, 2020). It is located in Kikuube district in Western Uganda bordered by DRC in the West, Hoima district in the North and Kagadi in the South.
This innovative clean energy project is being implemented by CARE International in Uganda in partnership with African Clean Energy (ACE) and Kabarole Research and Resource Centre (KRC) and is supported by the Dutch Relief Alliance Innovation Fund. It aims at improving the accessibility of quality and affordable clean energy solutions to refugees (particularly women) in the Kyangwali refugee settlement. The project’s innovative package includes two complementary programs namely; a) The User Referral Bonus (URB) model whereby the ACE package (ACE one stove + smart phone + solar powered lamp) will be made affordable to refugees in Kyangwali settlement and host communities, by allowing for payment in installments and also enabling URB participants to earn waivers on their monthly instalments through recommendation of peers; and b) Briquetting program whereby the first ten groups (farming cooperatives/VSLAs) which enroll at least half of their members into the URB will be supported with knowledge and equipment for clean, biomass briquette production, and also empowered to set up their own briquetting businesses. Read More...

Uganda Case Study External End Evaluation Partners for Resilience 2016-2020 programme

This report presents the findings and analysis from the evaluation of the PfR II Uganda country case. It is one of five case studies that were requested in the Terms of Reference (ToR) and subsequent exchanges with the PfR Evaluation Management Team (EMT) during the inception phase. The report starts with a short description of the PfR II Uganda country programme, followed by a clustering of findings and judgements along the structure of the evaluation matrix which had been agreed upon with the PfR EMT during the inception phase. The report ends with a section that lists a number of emerging observations and preliminary conclusions from this case. The annex compiles the documents reviewed, the persons interviewed and the results of the outcome harvesting workshop which was conducted at the end of the Uganda country visit. This visit was carried out by Mr George Kasumba, local consultant, and Mr Matthias Deneckere, ECDPM. The Uganda evaluation was supported by desk research conducted by ECDPM staff members Matthias Deneckere and Ashley Neat prior to the country visit. Read More...

WAYREP Baseline Report


WAYREP’s overall objective is to “Strengthen the resilience of refugee and Ugandan women, girls and youth to live a life free from violence (LFFV) in Uganda”. WAYREP focuses on women and girls’ empowerment within the context of some of Uganda’s most pressing current challenges such as rapid urbanization, regular and high rates of displacement and migration across and within Uganda’s borders and a very young and largely unemployed population. In 2020, this fragile context was further exacerbated with the outbreak of the Coronavirus pandemic (COVID 19) not only in terms of its health implications, but also in terms of its impact on livelihoods, safety and security. WAYREP is built on the hypothesis that Gender Based Violence (GBV) has two main drivers: gender inequality and poverty. This is exacerbated by displacement whether as a refugee or as an urban dweller coming from rural Uganda. WAYREP’s theory of change therefore states that: if refugee and vulnerable Ugandan women and girls have access to dignified livelihood opportunities, and if the gender, social and cultural norms that perpetuate GBV are challenged and minimized, then the likelihood of resorting to negative coping mechanisms - including GBV like early and forced marriage or commercial sex - will significantly reduce and women and girls’ self- reliance will increase.
The project seeks to achieve four result areas namely;
1. Enhanced sustainable and dignified livelihood for women and youth
2. Reduction of the acceptance of GBV
3. Enhanced psychosocial support to survivors of GBV
4. Increased accountability of the Government of Uganda (GoU) on the implementation of relevant
frameworks for women and girls’ protection and rights
The project is being implemented in Gulu Municipality (Pece and Bardege Divisions), Arua Municipality (River Oli Division, Omugo Settlement zones 4, 5, and 6) and Omugo Sub-county (in Obi, Angazi, Anufira, Duku, Boora and Ndapi Parishes).
This report is 81 pages long. Read More...

“Political Economy Analysis for food and nutrition security and community resilience, and analysis of conflicts affecting food, nutrition and income security in Harande program area” Integrated Report

The major findings of this twofold study firstly highlight peaceful as well as contentious coexistence between formal institutions put in place with decentralization and informal and customary institutions managing resources essential to food and nutrition security. Stemming from a centuries-old tradition based on the right of the first occupant, the paramount importance of lineage and family, strict intra-community differentiation of socio- professional categories both in the management of pastoral resources and fisheries in Delta flooded areas and farming in dry areas, these customary institutions are still greatly relevant and legitimate in the eyes of the different communities today. Conversely, these communities often find it difficult to grasp the legal principles and norms (State land domain, local communities’ responsibilities, local governance, the role of deconcentrated State officials etc.) supporting local governments’ role in resource management. Consequently, the implementation of the Harande Program should be guided by the socio-cultural specifities of the target areas and should take into account the customary conflict management mechanisms as well as those promoted by civil society organizations which are the most validated by populations in the region of Mopti. The report is 140 pages long. Read More...

Youth Livelihoods Needs Assessment & Labor Market Assesssment

This study was undertaken to assess the supply side (youth ages 14-30 needs and preferences related to livelihoods), as well as the demand side (needs and opportunities in the labor market) in preparation for the design of the Youth Empowerment & Leadership (YELI or “enlighten” in Bambara) curriculum and training plan (IO 2.2). This report is 37 pages long. Read More...

Baseline Study of the Food for Peace Development Food Assistance Project in Mali Final

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Food for Peace (FFP) awarded a contract for a development food assistance project in Mali in fiscal year (FY) 2015 to CARE International. The Human Capital, Accountability and Resilience Advancing Nutrition Security, Diversified Livelihoods and Empowerment (HARANDE) Project is implemented by CARE and its partners: Save the Children; Helen Keller International; Yam Giribolo Tumo; Sahel-Eco; and the Research and Technical Applications Group. The goal of the HARANDE Project—which means food security in Peulh—is to provide access to sustainable food, nutrition, and income security for 310,855 vulnerable household members in four districts (Bandiagara, Douentza, Tenenkou, and Youwarou) of the Mopti region in Mali by 2020. FFP contracted ICF to conduct a baseline study of the HARANDE Project in 2016 as the first phase of a pre-post evaluation cycle. The second phase will include a final evaluation, inclusive of an endline survey, in approximately five years. The baseline study includes a representative population-based household survey to collect data for key FFP indicators and a qualitative study to add context, richness, and depth to the findings from the household survey. The report is 434 pages long. Read More...

Mali Resilience Research Report

The objective of this research is to provide implementing partners, the Office of Food for Peace (FFP), the Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance (FANTA) Project, and the United States Agency for International Development / Center for Resilience (C4R) with insights into factors that strengthen household and community resilience in Mali. This report complements the Baseline Study implemented by ICF International in Fiscal Year 2016. The research examines factors, in the context of resilience and mitigation of the negative effects of shocks and stresses on well-being, which can serve as the foundation for an evidence base for improving resilience programming in the Human Capital, Accountability and Resilience Advancing Nutrition Security, Diversified Livelihoods and Empowerment (HARANDE) Project areas. This report is 102 pages long. Read More...

Beyond Economic Empowerment The Influence of Savings Groups on Women’s Public Participation in Fragile and (post) Conflict-Affected Settings Every Voice Counts

Women’s meaningful participation and influence in public processes in fragile and (post) conflict-affected settings (FCAS) is not only necessary to achieve inclusive development but is a fundamental human right. Unfortunately, in most contexts, men are overrepresented in decision-making and women do not have equal voice in the decisions that affect their lives. Some evidence suggests that the economic empowerment of women opens up opportunities for them to participate in public decision-making processes. One such means for economic empowerment in FCAS is savings groups. Savings groups are small, community-based groups that can provide members a safe space to save money, take small loans, and make investment decisions. Globally, women have made advances in improving their income and access to savings, as well as increased their entrepreneurial endeavours as a result of their participation in savings groups. Research also shows that women’s participation in savings groups improves their confidence, skills, and ability to influence household decision-making. This prompts the question: do these benefits of women’s participation in savings groups extend into the public sphere? In other words, does women’s participation in savings groups influence their public participation1 and decision-making? Through a mixed methods investigation across five countries (18 villages) in Africa and South Asia (Burundi, Mali, Niger, Pakistan, and Sudan), using CARE’s Gender Empowerment Framework, this research investigated the differences in outcomes between women who participate in savings groups under three CARE programmes: Every Voice Counts (EVC), Women on the Move (WoM), and Latter Day Saints Charities (LDS) Recovery Support for Vulnerable Households programmes [74 pages]. Read More...

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