Resilience

PROMOTING SOLAR POWERED ENERGY EFFICIENT STOVES IN KYANGWALI REFUGEE SETTLEMENT PROJECT (PROSPERS)

This report presents the results of the baseline survey on the project “Promoting Solar Powered Energy Efficient Stoves in Kyangwali Refugee Settlement”. Kyangwali settlement is one of the eleven (11)1 refugee settlements in Uganda with a population of over 12,780 refugees who mainly come from DRC (118,390 refugees); South Sudan (3,383 refugees); Rwanda (1,124 refugees); Burundi (107 refugees); Kenya (11 refugees); Somali (7 refugees) and Sudan (2 refugees) (UNHCR, 2020). It is located in Kikuube district in Western Uganda bordered by DRC in the West, Hoima district in the North and Kagadi in the South.
This innovative clean energy project is being implemented by CARE International in Uganda in partnership with African Clean Energy (ACE) and Kabarole Research and Resource Centre (KRC) and is supported by the Dutch Relief Alliance Innovation Fund. It aims at improving the accessibility of quality and affordable clean energy solutions to refugees (particularly women) in the Kyangwali refugee settlement. The project’s innovative package includes two complementary programs namely; a) The User Referral Bonus (URB) model whereby the ACE package (ACE one stove + smart phone + solar powered lamp) will be made affordable to refugees in Kyangwali settlement and host communities, by allowing for payment in installments and also enabling URB participants to earn waivers on their monthly instalments through recommendation of peers; and b) Briquetting program whereby the first ten groups (farming cooperatives/VSLAs) which enroll at least half of their members into the URB will be supported with knowledge and equipment for clean, biomass briquette production, and also empowered to set up their own briquetting businesses. Read More...

Uganda Case Study External End Evaluation Partners for Resilience 2016-2020 programme

This report presents the findings and analysis from the evaluation of the PfR II Uganda country case. It is one of five case studies that were requested in the Terms of Reference (ToR) and subsequent exchanges with the PfR Evaluation Management Team (EMT) during the inception phase. The report starts with a short description of the PfR II Uganda country programme, followed by a clustering of findings and judgements along the structure of the evaluation matrix which had been agreed upon with the PfR EMT during the inception phase. The report ends with a section that lists a number of emerging observations and preliminary conclusions from this case. The annex compiles the documents reviewed, the persons interviewed and the results of the outcome harvesting workshop which was conducted at the end of the Uganda country visit. This visit was carried out by Mr George Kasumba, local consultant, and Mr Matthias Deneckere, ECDPM. The Uganda evaluation was supported by desk research conducted by ECDPM staff members Matthias Deneckere and Ashley Neat prior to the country visit. Read More...

WAYREP Baseline Report


WAYREP’s overall objective is to “Strengthen the resilience of refugee and Ugandan women, girls and youth to live a life free from violence (LFFV) in Uganda”. WAYREP focuses on women and girls’ empowerment within the context of some of Uganda’s most pressing current challenges such as rapid urbanization, regular and high rates of displacement and migration across and within Uganda’s borders and a very young and largely unemployed population. In 2020, this fragile context was further exacerbated with the outbreak of the Coronavirus pandemic (COVID 19) not only in terms of its health implications, but also in terms of its impact on livelihoods, safety and security. WAYREP is built on the hypothesis that Gender Based Violence (GBV) has two main drivers: gender inequality and poverty. This is exacerbated by displacement whether as a refugee or as an urban dweller coming from rural Uganda. WAYREP’s theory of change therefore states that: if refugee and vulnerable Ugandan women and girls have access to dignified livelihood opportunities, and if the gender, social and cultural norms that perpetuate GBV are challenged and minimized, then the likelihood of resorting to negative coping mechanisms - including GBV like early and forced marriage or commercial sex - will significantly reduce and women and girls’ self- reliance will increase.
The project seeks to achieve four result areas namely;
1. Enhanced sustainable and dignified livelihood for women and youth
2. Reduction of the acceptance of GBV
3. Enhanced psychosocial support to survivors of GBV
4. Increased accountability of the Government of Uganda (GoU) on the implementation of relevant
frameworks for women and girls’ protection and rights
The project is being implemented in Gulu Municipality (Pece and Bardege Divisions), Arua Municipality (River Oli Division, Omugo Settlement zones 4, 5, and 6) and Omugo Sub-county (in Obi, Angazi, Anufira, Duku, Boora and Ndapi Parishes).
This report is 81 pages long. Read More...

“Political Economy Analysis for food and nutrition security and community resilience, and analysis of conflicts affecting food, nutrition and income security in Harande program area” Integrated Report

The major findings of this twofold study firstly highlight peaceful as well as contentious coexistence between formal institutions put in place with decentralization and informal and customary institutions managing resources essential to food and nutrition security. Stemming from a centuries-old tradition based on the right of the first occupant, the paramount importance of lineage and family, strict intra-community differentiation of socio- professional categories both in the management of pastoral resources and fisheries in Delta flooded areas and farming in dry areas, these customary institutions are still greatly relevant and legitimate in the eyes of the different communities today. Conversely, these communities often find it difficult to grasp the legal principles and norms (State land domain, local communities’ responsibilities, local governance, the role of deconcentrated State officials etc.) supporting local governments’ role in resource management. Consequently, the implementation of the Harande Program should be guided by the socio-cultural specifities of the target areas and should take into account the customary conflict management mechanisms as well as those promoted by civil society organizations which are the most validated by populations in the region of Mopti. The report is 140 pages long. Read More...

Youth Livelihoods Needs Assessment & Labor Market Assesssment

This study was undertaken to assess the supply side (youth ages 14-30 needs and preferences related to livelihoods), as well as the demand side (needs and opportunities in the labor market) in preparation for the design of the Youth Empowerment & Leadership (YELI or “enlighten” in Bambara) curriculum and training plan (IO 2.2). This report is 37 pages long. Read More...

Baseline Study of the Food for Peace Development Food Assistance Project in Mali Final

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Food for Peace (FFP) awarded a contract for a development food assistance project in Mali in fiscal year (FY) 2015 to CARE International. The Human Capital, Accountability and Resilience Advancing Nutrition Security, Diversified Livelihoods and Empowerment (HARANDE) Project is implemented by CARE and its partners: Save the Children; Helen Keller International; Yam Giribolo Tumo; Sahel-Eco; and the Research and Technical Applications Group. The goal of the HARANDE Project—which means food security in Peulh—is to provide access to sustainable food, nutrition, and income security for 310,855 vulnerable household members in four districts (Bandiagara, Douentza, Tenenkou, and Youwarou) of the Mopti region in Mali by 2020. FFP contracted ICF to conduct a baseline study of the HARANDE Project in 2016 as the first phase of a pre-post evaluation cycle. The second phase will include a final evaluation, inclusive of an endline survey, in approximately five years. The baseline study includes a representative population-based household survey to collect data for key FFP indicators and a qualitative study to add context, richness, and depth to the findings from the household survey. The report is 434 pages long. Read More...

Mali Resilience Research Report

The objective of this research is to provide implementing partners, the Office of Food for Peace (FFP), the Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance (FANTA) Project, and the United States Agency for International Development / Center for Resilience (C4R) with insights into factors that strengthen household and community resilience in Mali. This report complements the Baseline Study implemented by ICF International in Fiscal Year 2016. The research examines factors, in the context of resilience and mitigation of the negative effects of shocks and stresses on well-being, which can serve as the foundation for an evidence base for improving resilience programming in the Human Capital, Accountability and Resilience Advancing Nutrition Security, Diversified Livelihoods and Empowerment (HARANDE) Project areas. This report is 102 pages long. Read More...

Beyond Economic Empowerment The Influence of Savings Groups on Women’s Public Participation in Fragile and (post) Conflict-Affected Settings Every Voice Counts

Women’s meaningful participation and influence in public processes in fragile and (post) conflict-affected settings (FCAS) is not only necessary to achieve inclusive development but is a fundamental human right. Unfortunately, in most contexts, men are overrepresented in decision-making and women do not have equal voice in the decisions that affect their lives. Some evidence suggests that the economic empowerment of women opens up opportunities for them to participate in public decision-making processes. One such means for economic empowerment in FCAS is savings groups. Savings groups are small, community-based groups that can provide members a safe space to save money, take small loans, and make investment decisions. Globally, women have made advances in improving their income and access to savings, as well as increased their entrepreneurial endeavours as a result of their participation in savings groups. Research also shows that women’s participation in savings groups improves their confidence, skills, and ability to influence household decision-making. This prompts the question: do these benefits of women’s participation in savings groups extend into the public sphere? In other words, does women’s participation in savings groups influence their public participation1 and decision-making? Through a mixed methods investigation across five countries (18 villages) in Africa and South Asia (Burundi, Mali, Niger, Pakistan, and Sudan), using CARE’s Gender Empowerment Framework, this research investigated the differences in outcomes between women who participate in savings groups under three CARE programmes: Every Voice Counts (EVC), Women on the Move (WoM), and Latter Day Saints Charities (LDS) Recovery Support for Vulnerable Households programmes [74 pages]. Read More...

Productive Water Technologies to enhance resilience for smallholder farming households in Chiredzi and Mberengwa Baseline Report

CARE International in Zimbabwe is implementing the Productive Water Technologies to enhance Resilience for Smallholder Farming Households initiative, within two existing CARE resilience building projects. The LDSC-funded intervention will complement the software components of two ongoing CARE projects funded by the Zimbabwe Resilience Building Fund (ZRBF), which is managed by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). The two CARE projects, Enhancing Community Resilience and Sustainability (ECRAS) running from July 2016 to March 2021, and Enhancing Community Resilience and Inclusive Market Systems (ECRIMS) running from September 2017 to October 2020, are being implemented in Chiredzi (and Mwenezi) and Mberengwa (and Zvishavane) districts respectively.
The current projects mainly focus on software (training, capacity-building, etc.), with limited establishment of water infrastructure. Specifically, the new initiative will support year-round access to productive water for smallholder farming households in Chiredzi and Mberengwa districts through the establishment/construction and rehabilitation of water infrastructure and related production assets. Year-round water access will address challenges relating to livestock and crop production, thus helping improve food and nutrition security for smallholder farming households, including those headed by women and youth. Some of the water points also will provide safe drinking water. In each of the two districts (Mberengwa and Chiredzi), the proposed project interventions will be layered on and integrated with the two ongoing CARE projects to enhance resilience and sustainability. Both ECRAS and ECRIMS aim to increase community capacities to sustain development gains and achieve improved well-being in the face of shocks and stresses. The projects, which enhance household and community resilience, seek to achieve five outcomes: Household and community capacities and assets are strengthened to deal with economic and climate-related shocks and stresses [54 pages]. Read More...

Impact Evaluation of the Strengthen PSNP4 Institutions and Resilience (SPIR) Development Food Security Activity (DFSA) Baseline

World Vision, CARE and ORDA designed the SPIR DFSA to support delivery of PSNP4 while also developing and delivering multisectoral programming across the four project purposes in order to enhance livelihoods, increase resilience to shocks, and improve food security and nutrition for PSNP4 clients. The SPIR project will use community-level programming, training of government staff involved in public service delivery at the woreda (district) and kebele (subdistrict) level, and targeted livelihood transfers to support and strengthen PSNP4. Resource transfers received by SPIR participants will come primarily from transfers received from the PSNP4, as well as one-time livelihood transfers provided to the poorest PNSP clients to support livelihoods and promote graduation. Most other benefits of the SPIR project appear in the form of improved public service delivery and trainings to promote learning and support for community-level groups. For learning purposes, the SPIR impact evaluation combines major core components and innovative new activities under Purpose 1 on livelihoods and Purpose 2 on nutrition, along with selected activities under Purpose 3 on gender and youth and Purpose 4 on climate resilience, into a study design of overlapping interventions to learn what combination of activities has the greatest impact and is most cost-effective at improving SPIR outcomes [128 pages].

Attached to the Baseline Report are 3 Learning Briefs, The effects of SPIR poultry and unconditional cash transfers on livelihoods outcomes, The effects of SPIR interventions on nutrtion and childcare, and The effects of SPIR livelihoods and nutrition interventions on women’s and men’s well-being.
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