Gender Equality

A Baseline Study and Social Norms Analysis using SNAP for the project BERHAN: Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights Initiative in Amhara Region, Ethiopia

Background: BERHAN – Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights initiative in Amhara region of Ethiopia seeks to support women and girls in Fogera and Estie woredas to safely exercise their sexual and reproductive health rights, leading to improved wellbeing (impact).

Objective: The purpose of this study was to understand the social norms that are associated with the practices of female genital cutting (FGC) and early marriage (EM), and to establish a baseline for all project indicators.

The quantitative survey was conducted on a randomly selected sample of 375 respondents comprising of men, women, girls, and boys (adults and adolescents). Quantitative data were collected using an interviewer administered structured questionnaire. Qualitative data were collected by masters and PhD degree holders, and quantitative data were collected by trained and experienced BSC level data collectors.

Results: The results revealed that FGC and EM were common practices in the community with a prevalence of 85.0% and 64.0% respectively. The community held the practices because of various reasons among which are cultural preservation and lack of knowledge. The community members were highly influenced by the sanctions that made them change their initial positions. Generally, women could not use contraceptive methods without permission from their partners or family members and this applies to all modern contraceptive methods.Only 3.7% of girls and women in the age group of 15-49 were able to use a modern contraceptive of their choice and, only 30.5% were able to decide on their own reproductive health care use. Read More...

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE GENDERED EFFECTS OF THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC ON HOUSEHOLDS

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is arguably one of the biggest pandemics to hit the world in recent times. It began in Wuhan, China and within a span of a few months took a toll on all the countries. A pandemic of such magnitude was witnessed when the 1918 flue pandemic started in Europe, spreading to United States of America, Asia and later to the rest of the world. Globally, the pandemic has affected the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Governments across the world, including Kenya, have taken up different containment measures including introduction of economic stimulus programs to cushion women and men, girls and boys and the economy at large, from the devastating effects of the pandemic. In Kenya, the pandemic and its associated containment measures resulted in unprecedented effects on the country’s economic and social outcomes such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and people’s well-being with a disproportionate burden falling on women and girls. This report analyses the gendered socio-economic effects of COVID-19 and provides policy recommendations that will guide responses, interventions and recovery plans for COVID-19 in Kenya. Specifically, the report assesses the effect of COVID-19 on: incomes including remittances; food security; education; unpaid care and domestic work; access to healthcare services; access to sexual and reproductive health services; access to social protection; access to water and sanitation services; gender-based violence (GBV) due to restrictions associated with COVID-19, and the prevention and response mechanisms. The analysis in this report is informed by primary data collected from a sample of 2,587 individuals from all the 47 counties in Kenya between 4th August and 8th September 2020 using Computer Assisted Telephonic Interviews (CATI). Due to the sensitivity of GBV information and the need to uphold the privacy of respondents in the survey, a separate SMS-based survey was conducted. Two questionnaires were administered to a sample of 2,482 individuals drawn across all the 47 counties in Kenya. The same individuals were interviewed at different times with the duration of each interview lasting not longer than 20 minutes. A total of 34 Key Informant Interviews (KIIs), that is 19 women and 15 men, were conducted from both State and non-State actors to complement and triangulate the findings from the individual/ household data while drawing more insights on the effects and recovery plans from the pandemic. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Sofala – Beira

On the 23rd of January 2021 Tropical Cyclone Eloise made its landfall, in central Mozambique.. Over 441,686 people were affected, with 43,327 persons being displaced (the Instituto Nacional de Gestão Reduçãodo Risco de Desastres (INGD).) The storm also destroyed farmland, infrastructure and thousands of homes. Most of the areas hit by Cyclone Eloise were the same areas affected by Cyclone Idai less than two years ago and hit by tropical storm Chalane on 30 December 2020. CARE conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis from the 12th to the 18th of February in three of the affected districts in Sofala Province, Beira (with the focus on Inhamizua, IFAPA accommodation center, and Chipangara) Nhamatanda (with focus on Tica, and Jhon Segredo Accommodation center), and Buzi (with focus on Guara-Guara), at the transit centers, resettlement sites, and catchment areas. About 56 364 houses were totally or partially destroyed, others flooded, forcing some families to shelter with host families. Others families had been evacuated from flooded areas and were staying in crowded temporary accommodation. Those that were staying in accommodation centers had lost most of their resources, and were dependent on government for daily provision. Read More...

RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS ON THE IMPACT OF THE CORONAVIRUS ON GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE IN FOUR DISTRICTS OF ZAMBIA

Pandemics and outbreaks have differential impacts on women, men, girls and boys. From risk of exposure and biological susceptibility to infection to the social and economic implications, individuals’ experiences are likely to vary according to their biological and gender characteristics and their interaction with other social determinants (UNWomen, 2020). Because of this, global and national strategic plans for COVID-19 preparedness and response must be grounded in strong gender analysis and must ensure meaningful participation of affected groups, including women and girls, in decision-making and implementation.

The Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) was conducted in the four districts of Lusaka, Kalomo, Mpika, and Katete. A mixed method approach was employed to gather data from men, women, boys and girls on the impact of Covid-19 on Gender Based Violence (GBV), health, nutrition and water, sanitation and hygiene. Read More...

Gender Gaps in COVID 19 Vaccines

COVID-19 vaccinations are quickly becoming a story of inequality. Gender inequality is a critical part of this story. In 16 countries where CARE has data, women are less likely to be vaccinated, and less likely to feel vaccines are safe.
There are massive local and global gaps in who can get vaccinated Only 1 9 of people in low income countries are vaccinated, and 79 of vaccinations have been in wealth countries Tragically, wealth and geography are just two factors that skew access to vaccines Another is gender In many low and middle income countries, women are less likely to get COVID-19 vaccines than men are This compounds gender inequality women are already facing in health and decision making Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis MENA – Turkey Program

In an effort to understand the differentiated needs and capacities of the vulnerable Syrian refugee groups affected by the Syrian Crisis residing in Southeast Turkey, CARE updated its Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) conducted in 2019. Turkey hosts the largest share of refugees in the world; 90% of whom are Syrian and have relocated to Turkey since the beginning of the Syrian crisis. A high majority (98%) of the Syrian refugees are residing in urban areas and many face difficulties in meeting their basic needs and adopt negative coping mechanisms such as early marriage, child labor, and illegal employment. Harmful cultural and traditional practices, coupled with the lack of livelihoods and self-reliance opportunities, perpetuate a situation of risk as many families see child marriage as the only way to secure a future for their children.
CARE continues to work to strengthen capacities, to provide targeted protection assistance, including in preventing and responding to GBV, providing protection responses including assessing legal and other specialized services and ensuring families have reduced exposure to safety and security concerns. The assistance provide would be more effective with having gender-based needs and capacities identified and addressed throughout the intervention. To analyze the gendered dimension of the Syrian Crisis in Turkey and update its 2019 RGA data on the changing roles of women, men, girls and boys as well as their needs, capacities and coping strategies, CARE conducted 396 household surveys, 3 Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and a review of secondary data. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis North West Syria-Idleb

This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) provides information about the different needs, capacities and coping mechanisms of women, men, boys and girls living in Idleb Governorate. Idleb has long been a safe haven for hundreds of thousands of internally displaced people (IDP) since the early years of the Syrian conflict. The growing population of IDPs overstretched the already limited capacity of the governorate. Since 1 December 2019, almost one million people were forced to flee from their homes to escape from the violence and four out of five people who have been displaced are women, girls or boys.
1 Humanitarian workers in the field raised concerns over the effects of the current situation on women and children, due to displacement, crowded living conditions, the lack of privacy, exploitation, and other factors.
2 Women and girls are disproportionately affected by humanitarian crises due to the exacerbation of already existing gender inequalities and vulnerabilities. An inclusive, effective and successful humanitarian response should understand and address different needs, vulnerabilities, capacities and coping mechanisms of women, men, girls and boys.
For this purpose CARE conducted three Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) in 2014, 2018 and 2019 in North West Syria. The fieldwork of the last RGA was completed in August 2019 and the report was finalized in December 2019. However, as the situation deteriorated after heavy airstrikes and shelling targeted Idleb in mid-December, CARE decided to conduct a new RGA to better understand and respond to the evolving crisis. The objectives of this RGA are to inform program activities and procedures, including how to better target women and girls in ways that are safe, equitable, and empowering within the local context and develop a set of actionable recommendations for the different sectors based on key findings. The RGA used a CARE RGA3 methodology. It included a household survey of 396 participants: 186 women and 210 men. Read More...

Endline Evaluation: Every Voice Counts Somalia

Overall, we have found that the EVC program has made progress toward its goal of making governance processes in fragile settings more inclusive and effective. Using a mixed methods approach consisting of extensive desk review and qualitative and quantitative data collection, we evaluated the effectiveness, impact, efficiency, relevance, and sustainability of the EVC program in relation to the project. Community members (both male and female youth and adults) in Puntland and South West State were given telephonic perceptions surveys in order to understand how their perceptions of the role of women and youth in governance, awareness of their rights, and transparency and accountability of authorities had changed over the course of the project. Respondents were also asked open ended questions to gain a deeper understanding of how the EVC project contributed to the outcomes outlined in the theory of change. Remote KIIs with local authorities, first and second tier CSO members, CARE Somalia and Nederland project staff, Ministry Officials in Puntland and South West State, and other CARE partner organizations (RNW media and the Hague Academy for Inclusive Governance) were also conducted. The evaluation took place from April – October 2020.

Overall, we found that progress has been made in relation to all of the outcomes outlined in the ToC, particularly with regard to the outcomes under Domain 2: Capable Civil Society Organizations and Domain 4: Effective Spaces for Dialogue and Negotiation. [97 pages] Read More...

Regional project FAIR III “ For Active Inclusion & Rights of Roma Women in the Western Balkans III”

This intervention builds on extensive CARE’s expertise and experience in facilitating process related to women’s empowerment and gender equality across the globe and in the Balkan region. It also intends to scale up approaches and models that have proven successful over the last six years of the FAIR projects’ implementation (FAIR and FAIR II). The project seeks to empower Roma women and girls to be free and able to exercise their rights to live a healthy, dignified life free from violence, inequality and discrimination with support from their partners, families and communities in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia and Montenegro. This will be accomplished through four output level results that need to be met for the longer-term changes to happen, they are inter-connected and mutually reinforcing since only in that way the outcome can be accomplished.

The first one (Output 1) refers to the enhanced capacities of Roma CSOs, youth and key community actors to practice and promote gender equitable, healthy and non-violent lifestyle with help of tested models and approaches. Under the second expected result (Output 2) Improved access to and provision of services for Roma, Egyptian (RE) women and girls (in particular on SRMH, GBV and Education) will be ensured through strengthening of the Roma CSOs and the existing participatory accountability community mechanisms. Output 3will enable three national-level Roma women networks to be active and contribute to the effective functioning of the regional Roma Women Balkans Network and its enhanced efforts towards Post 2020 EU Roma Integration Agenda. In the last expected result (Output 4), Roma women and girls, CSOs and Networks are part of the regional and global social movement initiatives promoting and advocating for gender equality and (minority) women’s rights. The project will directly target 26,150 people in total –aiming at 85% Roma and over 60% women and girls. Data collection under this project will be disaggregated by sex, age and ethnicity, whenever possible. Over20,000 people are expected to be reached in the three target countries through a series of promotional activities. Final Beneficiaries will include about 78,000 people in the 3 target countries based on the assumption that each target group person will reach out to at least 3 persons in his/her direct environment. [13 pages] Read More...

Endline Evaluation of Udaan II: Catching the Missed Opportunity

Udaan II “Catching the Missed Opportunity” Project, funded by OPEC, is one of the most important initiatives for girls’ education and economic prosperity. As an instrument to women and girls’ empowerment through transforming harmful social norms, building life skills and advocating related policy reforms; the Project was operated for 3 years (November 2017 to October 2020). The project was focused on out of school girls (10 to 14 year old) from marginalized and socially excluded communities and have never been to school or dropped out in their primary education for delivering an accelerated learning approach. This project was implemented by Care Nepal in Krishannagar Rural Municipality, Kapilvastu Municipality and Maharajgunj Rural Municipality of Kapilbastu district in cooperation with its local partner Siddhartha Social Development Centre (SSDC).

The objective of the evaluation study was to measure both, the intended and unintended outcomes and impact of the project against the targeted results.

The evaluation study followed both the qualitative and quantitative methods for data collection. The focus group discussion, in-depth interview, and key informant interviews were the methods for field data collection. The data collected were analyzed and presented in tables, figures, and themes. [58 pages] Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all