Gender Equality

Every Voice Counts Global Final Report

Every day, we see women living in fragile settings across the globe demonstrating great power and resilience. We know these women have ideas that will change their communities for the better. However, few have the opportunity to be involved in decisions that affect their lives. CARE’s Every Voice Counts (EVC) programme, which ran from 2016-2020 in Afghanistan, Burundi, Pakistan, Rwanda, Somalia and Sudan, aimed to change that status quo.

Despite making up half the population, women around the world are under-represented in political processes, currently holding just 24.5% of legislative seats.1 Similarly, laws that discourage women’s economic opportunities such as access to institutions, property and jobs, exist in 155 out of 173 countries.2 In fragile settings, women are often structurally excluded from community and political decision-making. In addition, the average age in fragile settings is significantly lower than in other parts of the world, so the inclusion of youth in decision-making in certain EVC countries was critical.

EVC placed collaboration and dialogue at its core, bringing together men and women, citizens and local leaders. In cooperation with CARE country offices and partners, the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, The Hague Academy for Local Governance and RNW Media, we fought to shift discriminatory social norms, supported women and youth to use their voice, and trained local authorities and civil society organisations to influence and implement more inclusive governance processes. From village elders agreeing to include women in local elections to civil society organisations helping to improve laws protecting women from violence, the impact of this programme was undisputable. Read More...

Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Program (GEWEP-III) Baseline Study

The Gender Equality and Women Empowerment III (GEWEP-III) project focuses on strengthening women’s right organizations and women-led CSOs. In particular, the Kabul Women’s Association (KWA) members are included in the impact group of the project. In order to best foster an enabling environment for women’s greater participation and voice, the project also targets influential groups and male members of communities, who can play an essential role in the promotion of gender equality and women’s rights. The baseline assessment focused on four main objectives, to: (1) provide detailed contextual information/ situational analysis on gender norms, power dynamic, gender-based violence, violence against women, gender equity and behavior of individual women, their male member of communities and stakeholders (religious/community leaders) in each of the target areas relating to the three outcome areas to help refine and evidence the project theory of change, log frame indicators, targets, and assumptions, (2) gather relevant data to establish baseline for project indicators to enable changes in women’s lives to be measured over the course of the project and during the final evaluation, (3) develop recommendations for the project monitoring, learning and final evaluation assessment of the project, and (4) explore the current knowledge and attitudes towards gender related issues, women empowerment and male engagement strategies. The baseline study adopted cross-sectional design using both quantitative and qualitative data. The project literature was coupled with surveying and interviewing 478 project beneficiaries and stakeholders. Read More...

Rapid Needs Assessment Gaza May/June 2021

CARE conducted a rapid needs assessment in Gaza between May 28 and June 3, 2021 to understand people's evolving needs in the crisis there. This graphic underlines what they found, with a survey of 62 people, including 68% women, 32% men, and 16% people with disabilities. Read More...

EXAMINING WOMEN AND GIRLS’ SAFE SPACES (WGSS) IN HUMANITARIAN CONTEXTS: Research Findings from Northwest Syria and South Sudan

Gender-based violence (GBV) in humanitarian contexts represents a global issue of grave concern, disproportionately affecting women and girls. In light of its detrimental impact on the health, well-being and development of survivors, the international community has placed a strong priority on combatting and responding to GBV in all its forms.
Women and Girls’ Safe Spaces (WGSS) are among the most widely implemented GBV prevention and response programming interventions globally. In spite of their popularity and potential to increase the well-being, safety, and empowerment of women and girls, there is a lack of rigorous evidence regarding the role of these spaces in the lives of participants. Building an evidence base is particularly crucial in order to understand the impact and effectiveness of WGSS as an intervention and determine ways in which existing programming can be adapted to increase overall quality.
In response to the crucial need for evidence around WGSS programming globally, CARE USA conducted a study to examine the effectiveness of WGSS in the lives of women and girls in two conflict-affected settings, Northwest Syria and South Sudan. These locations are particularly relevant for this research as the selected study sites are home to a large number of internally displaced persons (IDPs), and are settings in which women and girls face a significant risk of experiencing GBV. These contexts are also ones in which CARE has existing WGSS interventions in place. Read More...

CASH AND VOUCHER ASSISTANCE IN RESPONSE TO THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

In April 2020, CARE received a five million dollar grant from MARS to implement a multi-country program, including Cote d’Ivoire, Ecuador, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Peru, Thailand, and Venezuela1, with the aim of reducing the negative impacts of COVID-19 on vulnerable populations, especially women and girls, using complementary and multimodal approaches. A key activity of this program was the provision of cash and voucher assistance (CVA) to vulnerable populations to meet their diverse basic needs. Program data indicated that CVA was implemented in Cote d’Ivoire, Ecuador, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, and Thailand. Monitoring data from different countries showed that CVA was unconditional; with cash modality representing 95% of transfers. Key targets populations for CVA activities vary by country and include: vulnerable households (Cote d’Ivoire, and Haiti); migrants and refugees (Honduras, Ecuador, and Thailand); domestic workers (Guatemala and Ecuador); survivors of GBV and other forms of violence against women (Guatemala and Ecuador); and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and queer/questioning (LGBTQI+) individuals (Ecuador). Across all projects (or countries), participants reported numerous uses of CVA including purchase foods stuff, payment of health services, hygiene services, rental/housing, savings and livelihoods activities.
Given the nature and scale of this program as well as its organizational commitment to learning, CARE was keen to understand the extent to which the project supported and protected vulnerable populations against the loss or disruption of their livelihoods in a gender sensitive manner. The study seeks to provide open-source learnings for peer
companies and agencies on how CVA was utilized in this program with two major questions: (i) How gender sensitive was the process for CARE’s CVA? (ii) How gender sensitive was the intended outcome of CARE’s CVA?
This documentation report compiles lessons from across the projects implemented in the targeted countries and draws from the diversity of their experiences to provide some recommendations on more gender sensitive CVA in the future. Read More...

Response to the Influx of refugees and returnees from Nigeria in Diffa Region

CARE est engagé à promouvoir l’égalité dans la jouissance des droits et des opportunités pour les hommes, les femmes, les garçons et les filles pauvres affectées par les crises et les catastrophes. Ce focus de CARE vise à améliorer l'intégration explicite du genre aussi bien dans les programmes humanitaire que de développement. Cet engagement est rendu officiel dans la politique Genre de CARE International1, dans sa vision 20202 et dans sa Stratégie humanitaire 2013-2020. Cette stratégie humanitaire met l’accent sur la compréhension et la réponse aux besoins différenciés des hommes, des femmes, des filles et des garçons affectés par les crises et les catastrophes.
L’un des outils utilisés pour améliorer la sensibilité genre des programmes humanitaires de CARE, est « l’analyse rapide de genre » dont l’objectif est d’assurer que les programmes humanitaires prennent en compte de façon adéquate les différents besoins, capacités et contributions des femmes, des hommes, des filles et des garçons. L’analyse de genre renseigne sur qui est touché (femmes, hommes, garçons, filles, femmes âgées, vieillards) ; qui a besoin de protection et comment ; qui a accès à quoi et qu’est-ce qui empêche l'accès ; Comment les différents groupes font face a la
situation; Quelles capacités chaque groupe a ; est-ce que les femmes et les hommes participent à égalité au processus décisionnel – Enfin l’analyse Genre permet de formuler de recommandations programmatiques appropriées.
CARE Niger a entamé un processus d’analyse rapide de genre sur la situation spécifique des refugiés, retournés et populations hôtes en région de Diffa suite à la déstabilisation du nord-est du Nigeria. Un premier rapport a été partagé vers le 25 Août consacrant une première étape de cette analyse en zone peri-urbaine. Ce deuxième rapport complète le premier avec cette fois-ci la situation en zone rural dans la commune de Bosso. Read More...

Nepal Second Phase COVID-19 RGA

Nepal is currently undergoing the devastating effects of the second wave of COVID-19 pandemic. With the unprecedented surge in COVID-19 infections, the government of Nepal imposed prohibitory orders since April 29 in Kathmandu valley. Similarly, District Administration Offices (DAOs) in 75 out of 77 districts in the country have enforced prohibitory orders to break the chain of COVID-19 spread.1 As the country is reeling under the weight of increasing infections and death rates with fragile health infrastructure, there has been less attention to and evidence on gender and socio-economic impacts of the crisis on the most vulnerable and marginalized populations.
Global evidence from the previous year suggests that the pandemic led to disruption of social, political and economic systems and deepening of pre-existing gender and social inequalities. UN study 2020 highlights that the distribution of effect of any disaster or emergency correlates with the access to resources, capabilities, and opportunities which systematically make certain groups more vulnerable to the impact of emergencies, in particular women and girls.2 Women and girls in Nepal are particularly vulnerable to the immediate and long-term health and socio-economic impacts of the pandemic because of the pervasive inequalities in gender norms and structures.
The RGA conducted by CARE Nepal in partnership with Ministry of Women, Children and Senior Citizens (MoWCSC), UNWOMEN and Save the Children Women 2020 had shown that women’s unpaid care work and unequal division of labor were exacerbated because of closure of schools, public spaces, and care services. In addition, men’s loss of jobs and income and use of savings on gambling and alcohol had led to increased household conflict and women’s vulnerability to domestic violence. The study also revealed that 83 per cent of respondents lost their jobs; the hardest hit among them being women working as daily wage workers. The pandemic had also aggravated intimate partners and gender based violence for women and girls especially from marginalized groups such as Dalits, gender and sexual minorities (LGBTIQ++), women with disabilities, and adolescent girls. Read More...

Republic of Fiji Tropical Cyclone Josie and Tropical Cyclone Keni Rapid Gender, Protection and Inclusion Analysis

In early April 2018 TC Josie (Category 1) hit the western and central parts of Fiji causing flooding, particularly on the main island of Vitu Levu in the Western Division. One week later, on 10 April, Tropical Cyclone Keni passed close to Viti Levu as a Category 3 system overnight compounding the impact of TC Josie. In the Western Division, TCs Josie and Keni have affected an estimated 77,140 people while In the Northern division, 700 people are estimated to have been affected. The storm also affected the Eastern Division, particularly on Kadavu Island. There were 5 confirmed deaths1 and one report of a missing person2 from these events. Initial assessments report a total of 12,000 people sought shelter at 202 evacuation centres on the night of the storm in all divisions. As of 27 April, all evacuation centres in the Western and Northern Divisions were closed, while 21 evacuation centres were still in operation in Kadavu Province in the Eastern Division housing 476 evacuees3. Read More...

Solomon Islands Rennell Island Oil Spill Rapid Social Impact Assessment March 2019

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“Because She Is Important” Concrete Actions for Gender Equity in Rural WASH: Solomon Islands

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