Usaid

Sugu Yiriwa etude de base (Baseline for Mali’s Sugu Yiriwa project)

L’étude de base pour l’établissement de la situation de référence des indicateurs de performance est une investigation initiée par Feed the Future Mali Sugu Yiriwa dans les cercles des régions de Mopti (Tenenkou, Youwarou, Douentza, Koro, Bankass, Bandiagara, Djenné et Mopti) et Tombouctou (Tombouctou, Goundam, Niafounké et Diré) dans le but de disposer d’une base de référence de certains indicateurs de performance afin de mieux suivre leur évolution ou changement.
Spécifiquement, il s’agit de connaître le niveau de référence de :
● L’indice de la capacité à se remettre des chocs et stress de la zone d’intervention ;
● La valeur des ventes annuelles des exploitations et des entreprises recevant l’assistance du Gouvernement Américain ;
● Pourcentage de changement dans l’offre des produits agricoles sur les marchés ciblés ;
● Pourcentage de changement des prix des produits agricoles sur les marchés ciblés ;
● Le nombre d’hectares sous pratiques de gestion ou de technologies améliorées qui font la promotion des pratiques améliorées de réduction des risques climatiques et/ou de gestion des ressources naturelles avec l’aide du gouvernement américain ;
● Le nombre d’individus dans le système agricole qui ont appliqué des pratiques améliorées de gestion ou des technologies avec l'aide du gouvernement américain ;
● La propriété des actifs ;
● L’accès au crédit et décisions à la matière ;
● Le pourcentage de participants qui déclarent une augmentation des aliments riches en micronutriments sur le marché local au cours des 12 derniers mois
● Augmentation en pourcentage d'aliments riches en micronutriments dans les marchés ciblés ;
● Le pourcentage des participants aux activités agricoles sensibles à la nutrition de l’USG consommant un régime alimentaire d’une diversité minimale.
Au total, 1,301 ménages et 132 structures (organisations des producteurs, associations villageoises d’épargne et de crédit et entreprises incluant les agro-dealers et vendeurs individuels) ont été enquêtées dans les deux régions concernées par l’étude. Read More...

Final Report for the Final Evaluation of OFDA Response program

This report presents the final evaluation of the United States’ Agency for International Development (Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance ( Response Program implemented by CARE Turkey and its partners in Aleppo and Idleb governorates of Northwest Syria. The evaluation aimed to assess the program’s relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, impact, sustainability and coordination using the Organization for Economic Co operation and Development's Development Assistance Committee (OECD DAC) evaluation criteria and was carried out from July to October 2021.

“I am very satisfied with this assistance in terms of gravelling the road, providing the camp with water and upgrading the tents for the entire camp. All of those interventions were desperately needed. People are satisfied because the situation has improved within the camp.”
-Camp Manager
“I can say that this service is very important in all aspects because it is securing clean and safe water for the neighborhood (…). Everyone in the neighborhood is satisfied with the services.”
-FGD participant Read More...

Final evaluation of the FFP III program 2021

Jouri for Research and Consulting was commissioned by CARE International (CARE) to undertake a final evaluation of the Food for Peace project, “Emergency and Regular Food Assistance in Syria” implemented in Aleppo and Idleb in Northwest Syria (NWS), funded by USAID’s Food for Peace (FFP) program. The project is implemented through four local partner organizations as well as CARE’S area office in Jarablus.
The project consisted of cash distribution (both one-off as well as multi-round cash for food (MRCFF) support and livelihoods activities, which included wheat value chain support (wheat purchase from selected farmers, milling into flour, distribution to bakeries for subsidized bread and infrastructure rehabilitation) and cash for work (CFW) activities. The project was implemented through the local partners Shafak, Ihsan, Syria Relief (SR) and Insani Yardımlaşma Derneği (IYD), as well as CARE’s area office (AO) in Jarablus.
The evaluation addressed the key evaluation questions organized under the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development's Development Assistance Committee (OECD DAC )evaluation criteria, including Relevance, Efficiency, Effectiveness, Impact and Sustainability. The impacts of coordination among other actors and between partners was also investigated. In total, Jouri conducted 587 surveys, nine focus group discussions (FGDs) and 40 key informant interviews (KIIs). Data was collected face to face and in some cases, remotely due to COVID-19. The evaluation was conducted between July and September 2021. Data was collected in August and September 2021. Read More...

Support for Service Delivery Integration- Services (SSDI-Services) Endline

SSDI-Services was the flagship project for USAID/Malawi’s health office. The project was implemented from November 8, 2011 to March 7, 2017 under a cooperative agreement, valued at USD 89 million. Active project implementation occurred over a 4.5-year period from April 2012 to December 2016, with the preceding and following months focused on startup and closeout activities respectively.

SSDI-Services provided financial and technical assistance to the Malawian Ministry of Health (MoH) to deliver, refine, and scale up high-impact interventions contained in the Essential Health Package (EHP). The EHP includes globally proven and cost-effective interventions to address key causes of illness and death in Malawi. SSDI-Services implemented interventions under the following program areas: maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH); family planning (FP); malaria; nutrition; HIV/AIDS; and sanitation and hygiene.

SSDI-Services was implemented by a consortium comprising Jhpiego as lead, CARE, Plan International, and Save the Children. The project focused on increasing access to, and strengthening the delivery of, EHP services both at the health facility and in the community. It leveraged the work of both SSDI-Communication and SSDI-Systems to improve health-seeking behavior and the quality of health services by addressing the informational needs of both service providers and their clients. It also addressed systems issues that may hinder the provision of high-quality Read More...

Ghana Strengthening Social Accountability Mechanism (GSAM) final

USAID/Ghana contracted Social Impact, Inc. to conduct an impact evaluation of USAID’s Ghana Strengthening Accountability Mechanisms (GSAM) program, which aims to increase accountability of local District Assemblies in Ghana. This randomized-controlled trial, impact evaluation tests the effect of two distinct efforts to increase accountability and improve service delivery outcomes at the district level. One-hundred and fifty of Ghana’s districts were matched and randomized into one of three groups: a top-down treatment group that received performance audits conducted by the central government Ghana Audit Service (GAS); a bottom-up treatment group that received civil-society organization (CSO) led scorecard campaigns; and a control group that did not receive either intervention.
Through surveys with citizens, local administrators, and local politicians and through a review of administrative data, we find that both CSO and GAS programming generally reduce citizen satisfaction with projects and services, but this is largely driven by districts that receive negative audit reports. That citizens are correctly attributing bad audit performance to poor-performing DAs is encouraging from the point of view of accountability. This progress with citizens has not, however, translated into many substantial changes in how administrators or politicians manage projects or project budgets. Neither GAS nor CSO programming improve transparency or corruption. GAS programming does reduce the incidence of partisan manipulation of public resources by politicians, and it also increases the perception of partisan manipulation among administrators. This is consistent with GAS sensitizing administrators to partisan manipulation and reducing its actual incidence among DA politicians.
CSO programming increases citizen-reported consultation on recent development, and administrators in CSO districts spend, on average, three hours more responding to constituents. Reasons that the intervention did not have a stronger impact on district officials includes (1) natural limits to the number of citizens reached by the intervention, (2) limited district government capacity and frequent turnover, and (3) local government dependence on federal budget transfers. Read More...

Final Evaluation Food for Peace II program in Syria

Jouri for Research and Consulting was commissioned by CARE International (CARE) to undertake a final evaluation of the project “Emergency and Regular Food Assistance in Syria” in Aleppo and Idleb, funded by USAID Food for Peace and implemented by four partner organizations over a period of 15 months. Project activities included multi-round and emergency cash assistance, in-kind assistance (RTE rations and ready to-eat rations) and wheat value chain support (wheat purchase from selected farmers participating in another of CARE’s livelihood project, milling into flour, distribution to bakeries for subsidized bread production, and infrastructure improvements). The evaluation was conducted in the period between August to mid-September 2020 to address the key evaluation questions posed by CARE, organized under the OECD DAC evaluation criteria: 1) Relevance, 2) Efficiency, 3) Effectiveness, 4) Impact, 5) Sustainability.
The purpose of the evaluation was to document evidence of change at outcome and impact levels to be used for organizational learning and improvements of future programming, and accountability towards donor, partners and ultimately beneficiaries. Read More...

NUTRITION AND HYGIENE: END OF PROJECT REPORT (2013‐2019)

In alignment with USAID’s resilience strategy to mitigate recurrent shocks on vulnerable populations in Mali, the overall goal of the Integrated Rural Program to Improve Nutrition and Hygiene – USAID Nutrition and Hygiene – project (2013‐2019) was to improve the nutritional status of women and children, with a special emphasis on building resilience through the prevention and treatment of undernutrition.
The project – which was implemented by a CARE‐led consortium that included Family Health International (FHI 360), the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and a Malian non‐governmental organization (NGO) called Yam‐Giribolo‐Tumo (YA‐G‐TU) – targeted three regions in Mali: Mopti, Ségou and Koulikoro. These regions are all characterized by drought and climate‐related chronic food insecurity and high acute malnutrition rates. The project was implemented in nine districts across these three regions: Nara (Koulikoro Region), Niono (Ségou Region), Mopti, Bandiagara, Bankass, Tenenkou, Youwarou, Koro and Djenne (Mopti Region). In 2016, the
project received additional funding from Feed the Future to reinforce its agriculture component in the Mopti region.
The project aimed to reach children during the 1,000‐day “window of opportunity” period between conception and the first two years of life through the promotion of community and health sector services, improved agricultural practices, nutrition education and social behavior change communication. Our approach addressed both the immediate causes of malnutrition – such as inadequate dietary intake and infectious diseases, including diarrheal diseases – and the underlying root causes of malnutrition – such as poor hygiene, inadequate sanitation infrastructure and barriers to the access to and consumption of quality, diverse foods. Read More...

Harande Outcome Mapping Report

The USAID-funded Harande program aims to sustainably improve the food, nutrition and income security of 179,690 vulnerable household members by 2020 in 193 communities of Youwarou, Tenenkou, Bandiagara and Douentza districts in the Mopti region. This area is located in the center of Mali and suffers from frequent drought and current conflict and political instability. The program is a Development Food Assistance Program (DFAP) and is implemented by a consortium of international NGOs, composed of CARE International (lead), Save the Children International (SCI), Helen Keller International (HKI) and two national NGOs, namely: YAGTU and Sahel Eco.

Starting from July 2019, the program set in motion a qualitative and participative approach known as « Outcome Mapping » through its M&E Team (Harande MEAL Team). This approach was favored because it allows adequate monitoring and also helps to assess the level of expected changes.

Upon completion of the implementation approach – which lasted for about 9 months – the Harande MEAL Team prepared this report based on information collected from community actors and beneficiaries of the program. Read More...

Zimbabwe OFDA Baseline 2018

CARE International in Zimbabwe is implementing a 12-month OFDA funded project in Gwanda and
Beitbridge district of Matabeleland South Province. The area is characterized by extensive farming ,where
livestock production is domineering and small grains production is the gateway to maintaining food
security levels. The current funding opportunity through OFDA aims to address the immediate agricultural
and financial needs of the most vulnerable households to recover from: the impact of successive drought
years, erratic rainfalls, mid-season dry spells, and prevent potential food insecurity. The declining
macroeconomic conditions and lack of development at the national level have compounded the impact
of the droughts and hindered recovery resulting in negative coping strategies as the majority of vulnerable
households are selling productive assets (mainly livestock) through the previous season and consequently
ad libitum before the coming farming season. Read More...

Rapport d’évaluation Finale du Projet Fagnoitse

Financé par OFDA et opérationnalisé par CARE International à Madagascar, le projet Fagnoitse a pour objectif de renforcer la résilience des populations vulnérables touchées par la sécheresse dans le sud de Madagascar. Son budget total s’élève à 1 262 725 USD pour une durée de 12 mois.
L’intervention vise au total 42 000 individus directs et se concentre sur trois volets dont :
1. Amélioration de la production agricole et de la sécurité alimentaire en fournissant : des intrants adéquats (semences/plants améliorés et résistants à la sécheresse), des outils, une formation aux techniques résilientes au climat (12,000 personnes) ; formation et mise en place d’installations de stockage pour la sécurité des semences et des productions agricoles (12,000 personnes) ; fourniture de petits ruminants/volaille, coupons d’alimentation/fourrage, formation technique (6,000 personnes);
2. Soutien de la reprise économique et des systèmes de marché en restaurant les moyens de subsistance (6,000 personnes) ; le soutien au développement de nouvelles entreprises en fonction de la mise en place de groupe d’épargne et de crédit (12,000 personnes) et le soutien à la transformation agricole/produits de la pêche (12,000 personnes) ; élaboration de business plans (9,000 personnes) ;
3. Promotion de l’accès à l’eau et l’hygiène par la mise en place/opérationnalisation de 120 comités de gestion des transports d'eau, la fourniture de charrettes à boeufs et des futs (12,000 personnes) ; fourniture d'équipements de stockage d’eau (900 personnes), la fourniture de séances de sensibilisation/information sur l’hygiène, l'alimentation et la nutrition (36,000 personnes), et la fourniture de kits Wash (bidons d’eau, seaux d’eau, gobelet, barres de savon) (3,000 personnes). Read More...

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