Climate Change

Enhancing adaptive capacity of women and ethnic smallholder farmers through improved agro-climate information in Mai and Samphanh district, Phongsaly Province, Laos

The Agro-Climate Information for the Adoption of Resilient Farming Practices by Women and Ethnic Minority Farmers (ACIS2) is implemented by CARE International in Lao PDR. The project financed by the Ministry of the Environment, Climate and Sustainable Development (MECDD) in Luxembourg, is designed to support poor and vulnerable households in remote, rural areas and to enable women and ethnic minority farmers in Mai and Samphanh districts (Phongsaly province) to better anticipate risks and opportunities related to climate variability thus improving their response through participatory and equitable agro-climatic planning. The project’s aim is to contribute to SDG 13 by increasing climate resilience of women and ethnic minority farmers in northern Laos.
The purpose of the evaluation was to determine the project’s success in implementing activities and in attaining the project’s goals and expected results. The ACIS2 has implemented a wide variety of activities to increase the resilience of ethnic communities to climate change and climate variability. The project has been successful in achieving its objectives and expected results. Project provide the weather forecast and agriculture advisory and support for cardamom production, intercropping galangal, pineapple, fruit trees, bee keeping, vegetable gardening, improved rice production and support to women’s savings and loans groups which has resulted in reducing the impact of climatic hazards and improving farmers’ incomes.
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Climate Learning and Advocacy for Resilience (CLAR) Programme

Climate Learning and Advocacy for Resilience (CLAR) was a CARE Denmark global programme that during the years 2018-2021 provided technical support to CARE country programmes. The overall objective of CLAR was “Adaptive capacity and resilience of vulnerable communities to climate change impacts, risks and uncertainties has increased.” The programme had three interrelated specific objectives, focusing on (1) demonstrating good practice, innovation and impact in climate resilience, and generating new evidence and learning, (2) improving capacity and influence among CSOs and networks on global and national policies, plans and projects on climate change adaptation and finance, and (3) strengthening of climate knowledge brokering for multi-stakeholder, cross-discipline and South-South learning and coordination.
The intention with CLAR was to link practical approaches and outcomes in climate change adaptation work with influencing policy and planning processes, in particular national adaptation plans (NAPs) and finance. CLAR was to add value to CARE country programmes through the provision of technical support for integration of climate change adaptation implementation as well as cross-country learning and knowledge sharing. CLAR targeted both local, national, and global policy spaces to promote pro-poor, equitable and effective adaptation policies, and mechanisms. Through the Southern Voices on Adaptation (SVA) advocacy community of practice, CLAR supported the sharing of experiences and best practices in different contexts on how to influence adaptation policies and adaptation finance. Read More...

EVALUATION FINALE DU PROJET COOPERER II – APPROCHE INTERCOMMUNALE POUR UNE STABILISATION TERRITORIALE A L’EXTREME-NORD CAMEROUN : AXE KAELE – TOULOUM – YAGOUA RAPPORT FINALE

Malgré son potentiel économique et naturel indéniable, le Cameroun affiche un taux de pauvreté élevé qui décroit très faiblement (40,2% en 2001 ; 39,9% en 2007 et 37,5% en 2014). Dans le souci d’apporter sa contribution à la stabilité de la région de l’Extrême-Nord meurtrie par des crises multiformes, CARE International à travers son programme Résilience et inclusion des jeunes et des femmes, a développé l’initiative « Communes et Organisation de la société Civile Performantes pour des populations Engagées et Résilientes - COOPERER II », mise en œuvre dans les communes de Touloum, Yagoua et Kaélé de la région de l’Extrême-Nord. Le projet a couvert la période s’étendant d’avril 2019 à juin 2020, avec comme objectif global de contribuer à l’accès durable des femmes et des jeunes touchés par les effets de la crise sécuritaire à des opportunités agro-pastorales, sociales et économiques stables afin
de renforcer leur résilience face aux aléas environnementaux et climatiques Read More...

RESET II Project Promoting Resilient Livelihoods in Borana Final Report

Purpose: The purpose of this end line evaluation is to assess the achievements, constraints and lessons learnt and to produce sufficient evidence to show how the project performed against its overall objective. Overview of the project: Funded by the European Union (EU) through its European Union Trust Fund (EUTF) with a total budget of Є6,586,291, the Promoting Resilient Livelihoods in Borana RESET II Project was implemented by a consortium of CARE Ethiopia, Oromo Self Help Organization (OSHO) and Action against Hunger (AAH). The project focused in the geographic area of Arero, Miyo, Dire, Moyale, Dillo and Dhas districts in the Borena Zone within the Oromia region. The overall aim of enhancing the resilience of 100,000 PSNP beneficiaries, reducing irregular migration through improved access and coverage to provision of WASH, health and nutrition services, diversifying and increasing livelihood opportunities and incomes, improving Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) capacity, enhancing research and knowledge management systems as well as reducing barriers to women empowerment, the project begun implementation October 2016 and end in December 2020. CARE’s Pastoralist Resilience Casual Model (PRCM) using proven CARE’S Village Saving and Loan Associations (VSLA), Climate Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment (CVCA), Social Analysis and Action (SAA), Participatory Scenario Planning (PSP) and AAH’s as well as Assisting Behavior change (ABC) methods and approaches were utilized throughout the project. Read More...

Supporting flood Forecast-based Action and Learning (SUFAL) Project in the 2020 Monsoon Floods

Background: ‘Supporting flood Forecast-based Action and Learning’ (SUFAL) project was designed to contribute to reducing the adverse impacts of the increasing frequency of catastrophic flooding on the vulnerable and poor communities through Forecast-based Action (FbA). The project was funded by The Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO) and was implemented through a consortium led by CARE Bangladesh, with Concern Worldwide, Islamic Relief and Regional Integrated Multi-Hazard Early Warning System for Africa and Asia (RIMES). The project was implemented in three northern districts of Bangladesh: Jamalpur, Gaibandha, and Kurigram. FbA contributed to disseminating Flood Early Warning messages with a lead time of 10 – 15 days with timely and accurate weather forecast information, while and it also helping to identify potential flooding areas.

Methodology: The primary purpose of the study was to “Evaluate the impact of early actions” applied through the SUFAL project on household and community beneficiaries in responding to the 2020 monsoon floods. Customized OECD-DAC criteria, Quasi-experimental design (Difference-in-Difference Method), Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) framework and Value for Money (VfM) framework were used as guiding methods and tools to design study instruments and evaluate the impact of early actions at every stakeholder level. The study covered a control group in non-project areas and three treatment groups in the project areas: Treatment group 1 (EWM support), Treatment group 2 (EWM + Evacuation + Shelter + WASH support), Treatment group 3 (EWM + Evacuation + Shelter + WASH + Cash-grant support). Treatment groups were categorized in three different groups to conduct cost-effectiveness analysis. The study areas were in the districts of Kurigram (Hatia, Begumganj, Buraburi, Shaheber Alga unions), Gaibandha (Bharatkhali, Saghata, Ghuridaha, Haldia unions) and Jamalpur (Kulkandi, Chinaduli, Noarpara, Shapdhor. The survey sample consisted of 224 control respondents (of which 153 were women) and 754 treatment respondents (of which 426 were women), among which Sample for treatment group 1, 2, and 3 were 293 (100 women), 292 (192 women) and 169 (134 women), respectively. A total of 118 of the 754 treatment households interviewed through the survey were women-headed households and 38 out of 224 control group households were women headed households. The team had conducted 7 FGDs with community members in the three implementation areas, and 27 KIIs with community volunteers, project staff, government officials, and other related NGOs.

Impact: It was found through the study that less people in treatment group experienced damages compared to control households, treatment households saved more resources in 2020 than control households, and the average monetary values of assets saved by treatment group in 2020 were higher compared to the control group households. Due to the drawn-out duration and intensity of the flood in 2020, respondents reported that they were not able to prevent more damages although they took more early actions. Besides, treatment areas were the most flood affected areas. The early messages had helped the community to prevent damage to their assets and livelihoods. The percentage of damage prevented in agricultural sector for the treatment group had increased to 28% since the flood of 2019. The damage prevented in fisheries had increased significantly by 18 percent in 2020 in compared to that of 2019. The death of family members from waterborne diseases had decreased (except female members) in comparison to the previous flood in 2019. It is quite evident that the early warning message had enabled the males to take early actions regarding relocation of the vulnerable
family members to higher grounds, relative’s houses, or to the shelters. The cash for work modality had also helped the community people to obtain a source of income by working for the embankment, roads, bamboo bridges, etc. Shelter renovations and upgradations reportedly encouraged the community people to evacuate faster. The average amount of loan taken by a treatment respondent and control respondent was found to have been Taka 20,194 and Taka 18,335 respectively. However, post flood loan burden was significantly less for the cash grant recipients (only 32% took loan after flood) as compared to other treatment groups (more than 50% took loan). The
cash grants are said to have helped the recipients address their basic needs during the flood and also helped them to some extent to repair their house and pay for livestock treatment after the flood. [70 pages] Read More...

Cocoa Sustainability Initiative III

The Cocoa Sustainability Initiative phase 3 (CSI III) is a three-year partnership between General Mills Foundation and CARE International that will be implemented over the period December 2020 to November 2023. The project seeks to improve the food and nutrition security of over 3,500 cocoa farmers and their families in 20 communities in the Asikuma-Odoben-Brakwa District in the Central Region of Ghana by promoting sustainable agriculture, climate resilience, inclusive agriculture systems, women’s empowerment and improved nutrition practices. Building on the success of CSI phase I and II, CSI III addresses a range of interconnected issues, from low agricultural productivity and income to gender equality and voice to inclusive governance, child protection, nutrition and climate change resilience. The aim of the study was to provide baseline values for project indicators to help track the progress and impact of the project during and after implementation. Drawing on face-to-face interviews, a mixed method approach with critical gender lens was employed in data collection and analysis. Specifically, data were collected through a household survey (N=225) and Focus Group Discussions with men and women (N=10). A summary of key findings and recommendations are presented below. [71 pages] Read More...

Pastoralist Areas Resilience Improvement and Market Expansion (PRIME) Project Impact Evaluation

The Pastoralist Areas Resilience Improvement and Market Expansion (PRIME) project was implemented from October 2012 to September 2017 in one of the most shock-prone areas of the world, the drylands of Ethiopia. A key project goal was to enhance the resilience of households to shocks. In particular, it aimed to enable households to withstand and recover from the recurrent climate-related shocks—mainly drought—to which they are exposed.

This report has drawn on the data collected as part of the PRIME Impact Evaluation (IE) Baseline and Endline Surveys, as well as two Recurrent Monitoring Surveys, to meet three objectives:
(1) Document the changes that have taken place over the project’s implementation period in key resilience-related variables (shock exposure, livelihoods, resilience capacities, coping strategies, wellbeing outcomes, and resilience);
(2) Determine whether the project’s resilience-strengthening interventions served to strengthen households’ resilience to shocks;
(3) Identify which resilience capacities—including specific absorptive, adaptive, and transformative capacities—were strengthened, and by which types of interventions, in order to inform and enhance the effectiveness of future resilience-strengthening projects.

The PRIME impact evaluation was conducted in two of the three project areas: Borena in the regional state of Oromiya and Jijiga in Somali, for a sample of 2,750 panel households. It draws on both quantitative and qualitative data, the latter collected through key informant interviews and focus group discussions [188 pages] Read More...

COCOA SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVE II (CSI II)

CARE International et Cargill WA ont noué un partenariat stratégique pour la mise en oeuvre de projets de développement en faveur des producteurs de cacao et de leurs communautés. A cet effet, depuis 2010, CARE bénéficie du soutien financier de Cargill. Dans la continuité de ce partenariat, en Septembre 2017, General Mills a conclu un partenariat avec CARE, pour la mise en oeuvre du projet Cocoa Sustainability Initiative II (CSI II) et cela, jusqu’en fin Août 2020. En guise de préparation de la clôture du projet, CARE a commandité une évaluation finale, conduite par une Consultante, appuyée par une équipe technique de CARE Côte d’Ivoire, pour mesurer les progrès réalisés en rapport avec les objectifs et résultats cibles. Dans la perspective de répondre aux objectifs et résultats attendus de l’évaluation, une stratégie participative a été mise en oeuvre, ce qui a permis d’analyser et d’évaluer de manière qualitative et quantitative, l’ensemble des éléments caractéristiques du projet. Read More...

PROMOTING SOLAR POWERED ENERGY EFFICIENT STOVES IN KYANGWALI REFUGEE SETTLEMENT PROJECT (PROSPERS)

This report presents the results of the baseline survey on the project “Promoting Solar Powered Energy Efficient Stoves in Kyangwali Refugee Settlement”. Kyangwali settlement is one of the eleven (11)1 refugee settlements in Uganda with a population of over 12,780 refugees who mainly come from DRC (118,390 refugees); South Sudan (3,383 refugees); Rwanda (1,124 refugees); Burundi (107 refugees); Kenya (11 refugees); Somali (7 refugees) and Sudan (2 refugees) (UNHCR, 2020). It is located in Kikuube district in Western Uganda bordered by DRC in the West, Hoima district in the North and Kagadi in the South.
This innovative clean energy project is being implemented by CARE International in Uganda in partnership with African Clean Energy (ACE) and Kabarole Research and Resource Centre (KRC) and is supported by the Dutch Relief Alliance Innovation Fund. It aims at improving the accessibility of quality and affordable clean energy solutions to refugees (particularly women) in the Kyangwali refugee settlement. The project’s innovative package includes two complementary programs namely; a) The User Referral Bonus (URB) model whereby the ACE package (ACE one stove + smart phone + solar powered lamp) will be made affordable to refugees in Kyangwali settlement and host communities, by allowing for payment in installments and also enabling URB participants to earn waivers on their monthly instalments through recommendation of peers; and b) Briquetting program whereby the first ten groups (farming cooperatives/VSLAs) which enroll at least half of their members into the URB will be supported with knowledge and equipment for clean, biomass briquette production, and also empowered to set up their own briquetting businesses. Read More...

Uganda Case Study External End Evaluation Partners for Resilience 2016-2020 programme

This report presents the findings and analysis from the evaluation of the PfR II Uganda country case. It is one of five case studies that were requested in the Terms of Reference (ToR) and subsequent exchanges with the PfR Evaluation Management Team (EMT) during the inception phase. The report starts with a short description of the PfR II Uganda country programme, followed by a clustering of findings and judgements along the structure of the evaluation matrix which had been agreed upon with the PfR EMT during the inception phase. The report ends with a section that lists a number of emerging observations and preliminary conclusions from this case. The annex compiles the documents reviewed, the persons interviewed and the results of the outcome harvesting workshop which was conducted at the end of the Uganda country visit. This visit was carried out by Mr George Kasumba, local consultant, and Mr Matthias Deneckere, ECDPM. The Uganda evaluation was supported by desk research conducted by ECDPM staff members Matthias Deneckere and Ashley Neat prior to the country visit. Read More...

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