COVID 19 RGA

Nepal Second Phase COVID-19 RGA

Nepal is currently undergoing the devastating effects of the second wave of COVID-19 pandemic. With the unprecedented surge in COVID-19 infections, the government of Nepal imposed prohibitory orders since April 29 in Kathmandu valley. Similarly, District Administration Offices (DAOs) in 75 out of 77 districts in the country have enforced prohibitory orders to break the chain of COVID-19 spread.1 As the country is reeling under the weight of increasing infections and death rates with fragile health infrastructure, there has been less attention to and evidence on gender and socio-economic impacts of the crisis on the most vulnerable and marginalized populations.
Global evidence from the previous year suggests that the pandemic led to disruption of social, political and economic systems and deepening of pre-existing gender and social inequalities. UN study 2020 highlights that the distribution of effect of any disaster or emergency correlates with the access to resources, capabilities, and opportunities which systematically make certain groups more vulnerable to the impact of emergencies, in particular women and girls.2 Women and girls in Nepal are particularly vulnerable to the immediate and long-term health and socio-economic impacts of the pandemic because of the pervasive inequalities in gender norms and structures.
The RGA conducted by CARE Nepal in partnership with Ministry of Women, Children and Senior Citizens (MoWCSC), UNWOMEN and Save the Children Women 2020 had shown that women’s unpaid care work and unequal division of labor were exacerbated because of closure of schools, public spaces, and care services. In addition, men’s loss of jobs and income and use of savings on gambling and alcohol had led to increased household conflict and women’s vulnerability to domestic violence. The study also revealed that 83 per cent of respondents lost their jobs; the hardest hit among them being women working as daily wage workers. The pandemic had also aggravated intimate partners and gender based violence for women and girls especially from marginalized groups such as Dalits, gender and sexual minorities (LGBTIQ++), women with disabilities, and adolescent girls. Read More...

Fiji Gender, Disability & Inclusion Snapshot COVID-19, TC Yasa and TC Ana

Fiji is facing unprecedented challenges as a result of the compounded effects of COVID-19, Tropical Cyclone (TC) Yasa and TC Ana. TC Yasa was a category five cyclone with winds up to 345 kilometers per hour which made landfall over Fiji’s second largest island, Vanua Levu on 17 December 2020. TC Yasa was not the only major cyclone in 2020 as TC Harold had hit Viti Levu and the islands to the east as a Category Four cyclone on 8 April 2020. In the midst of response and recovery efforts for these cyclones, coupled with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, Fiji was hit again by another tropical cyclone, TC Ana, on 31 January 2021. Read More...

Gender, Disability and Inclusion Analysis for COVID-19 and Tropical Cyclone Harold

When Tropical Cyclone Harold hit on the 2nd April, the Solomon Islands was among the first countries forced to grapple with the complex intersection of COVID-19 and disaster. While the country has managed to contain the spread of COVID-19 and prevent community transmission to date, the pandemic is still having a major impact on everyday life for men, women, boys and girls. Lock-down measures, the abrupt cessation of tourism, severe disruptions to international trade and other flow-on effects of the global pandemic (combined with the effects of TC Harold and pre-existing vulnerabilities) are resulting in widespread income and job losses, heightened stress and tension, increased family violence, displacement, and disrupted access to education, health, and water and sanitation.
If community transmission of COVID-19 occurs, there will be a public health crisis with complex contextual challenges. These include a population dispersed across isolated islands and limited resources, including limited access to quality health services.
The current COVID-19 impacts are disproportionately affecting women, girls and people with disabilities in the Solomon Islands, and this will be exacerbated in the case of a wider COVID-19 outbreak. All humanitarian programming must consider gender roles and responsibilities and the existing patterns of community participation and leadership, in order to ‘do no harm’ and help facilitate a gender and disability inclusive approach to COVID-19 prevention and recovery.

This gender, disability and inclusion analysis has the following objectives:
* To analyse and understand the different impacts that COVID-19 and TC Harold is having on women, men, girls, boys, people living with disabilities and other vulnerable groups in the Solomon Islands;
* To inform humanitarian programming in the Solomon Islands based on the different needs of women, men, boys, girls and people living with disabilities with a particular focus on gender-based violence (GBV) and livelihoods. Read More...

Papua New Guinea COVID-19 RGA

The impacts – direct and indirect – of the COVID-19 pandemic fall disproportionately on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups in society. PNG presents a range of contextual challenges, including difficult geography. Access to quality health services is limited, due to a lack of infrastructure, equipment, and qualified personnel3. Services are easily stretched or overwhelmed, and provision of specialised services and intensive care is limited. In the current situation, this can pose a problem of access to care if the number of infected people increases4. Coupled with gender inequality, which remains pervasive across the Pacific, in particular in the critical domains of leadership and decision making, access to and control of resources and gender-based violence5, the public health response to COVID-19 can become immeasurably more complex. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) Mopti Mali April 2020

The ongoing crisis in Mali has led to levels of socioeconomic disruption and displacement at an unprecedented scale. There are numerous factors that contribute to aggravate/worsen the situation - political crises, decades of drought, structural food insecurity, climate change, high rates of poverty, and high rates of youth unemployment. In many areas traditional livelihoods have been usurped by political conflict or by drought, causing extremely high rates of displacement and food insecurity. Since 2017 there have been significant increases in violent attacks and rates of displacement, and the crisis continues to grow in scope and scale into 2020 (OCHA 2020).
The first few months of 2020 saw escalating violence and conflict, leading to a sharp rise in internal displacements, the continued disruption of markets, and a deterioration in the supply of basic social services. The results from the recent food and nutrition security analysis (Cadre Harmonisé, November 2019) indicate that from October to December 2019, 648,330 people are estimated to be food insecure – representing an increase of 250 percent compared to the same time last year (WFP 2020).
Mali is a highly patriarchal society, with institutionalized gender inequality that marginalizes women. The effects of the crisis have not affected all equally, and there is significant evidence that there are significant differences, with the resources, rights, and afforded to women, men, boys, girls, and other groups of individuals, requiring different coping strategies. High levels of diversity in ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and circumstance within communities bring about important intersections between power and vulnerability that further prioritize and marginalize certain individuals. As the crisis in Mali continues to rapidly evolve, it is critical to ensure that humanitarian interventions are designed to respond to the needs of women, men, boys, girls, people with disabilities, and other vulnerable groups.
To better understand the experiences of women, men, boys within this highly dynamic and rapidly evolving crisis, CARE Mali conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis in March 2020, with the objective of analysing and understanding how the insecurity and conflict in the Mopti region has influenced women, men, girls, boys, people with disabilities, and other specific groups; as well as to identify and propose solutions to limitations women face to full participation in decision making; and to provide practical advice to decision-making to improve gender integration in humanitarian response programming and planning. Of key importance was the generation of recommendations to the Harande program, a USAID Food for Peace program being led by CARE and implemented in the Mopti region from 2015-2020. Read More...

The Impact of COVID-19 on Women in Democratic Republic of Congo

Evidence worldwide indicates that women are disproportionately affected by the health and socio-economic impacts of intervention
measures applied for the control of COVID-19. Women make up the majority of the informal labour sector and are more likely to suffer job losses or reduced income as a result of closed borders, markets and shops, and restricted movement. Sexual and reproductive health services are often the first to face restrictions in terms of availability and access. School closures place an additional burden on women, who take on childcare responsibilities, including ensuring adequate nutrition. Girls who cannot go to school are at increased risk of sexual violence, pregnancy, and early marriage - a trend that was widely observed in areas affected by Ebola during the 2014-2016 epidemic in West Africa. Risks are exacerbated for women and girls living in the poorest households in remote rural areas.
Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in March 2020, mixed methods data produced by the Social Sciences Analytics Cell (CASS) and its partners presents a dynamic where pre-existing disparities between men and women in terms of health, social protection and economic status are being exacerbated by the outbreak and its response. This report presents an integrated multidisciplinary analysis of the impact of COVID-19 and its response on women and girls in the DRC, highlighting changes that have occurred since the beginning of the outbreak. The objective of this report is to provide evidence to support decision-making for strategies to respond to the outbreak to ensure that the health, protection and economic security of women and girls is prioritised. Read More...

COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis DR Congo

Depuis le début de l’épidémie déclarée le 10 mars 2020 jusqu’en date du 26 Aout 2020, le cumul des cas est de 9.915, dont 9.914 cas confirmés et 1 cas probable. Au total, il y a eu 255 décès (254 cas confirmés et 1 cas probable) et 9.020 personnes guéries.i
En RDC, la prévention et la réponse à la pandémie COVID 19 sont guidées au niveau National par un « Plan de préparation et de riposte à l’épidémie de COVID 19 » publié en début Mars 2020. Ce plan comprend 9 objectifs bien définis mais les aspects spécifiques aux questions de protection transversale et de genre sont faiblement développés.
Quoi que les données nationales qui renseignent sur la situation épidémiologique en RDC ne soient pas désagrégées par âge et par sexe, il est évident que les hommes, femmes, filles et garçons des différents âges, situations sociales confondues ne sont pas touchées de la même manière par la pandémie à COVID 19 surtout que déjà traditionnellement, il s’observe un déséquilibre entre les hommes, les femmes, les filles et les garçons au niveau des rôles, responsabilités, accès et contrôle, participation et prise de décision et au niveau des aspects de protection.
Dans le souci d’améliorer sa mise en oeuvre pendant la période de la pandémie, CARE I DRC a fait une analyse genre rapide période du 15 Avril jusqu’en fin Mai 2020. Une mise à jour a été faite sur base des informations recueillies le 18 Juillet 2020. Cette analyse qualitative vise à renseigner sur les problèmes spécifiques des femmes, hommes, filles et garçons pendant cette période de pandémie à COVID 19. Les éléments issus des données secondaires appuieront la triangulation des informations. Les thématiques d’analyse sont : rôles et responsabilités, accès aux ressources, services et l’information, prise des décisions, influence des croyances, sécurité, et sante / bien être. Les informations ont été recueillies dans les villes urbaines et cités rurales dans lesquelles CARE I mène des activités et a des bureaux et au moins 1 staff. Les provinces concernées sont le Nord Kivu (Beni, Butembo, Goma et territoire de Nyiragongo), Sud Kivu (Bukavu et Uvira) et la ville province de Kinshasa. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Northeast Nigeria – Borno

Borno is a state in northeast Nigeria. Borno has been the epicentre of the Organized A since it began its insurgency in 2009. Records of Boko Haram operations show that thousands of people have either been murdered or kidnapped as a result of the group’s activities from July 27, 2009, through late 2019.
For Borno, COVID-19 is a “crisis within a crisis” and presents a range of challenges in a context with limited resources. In most localities (named local government areas or LGAs), access to quality health services, including intensive care, is limited. Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) e.g. malaria, water borne illnesses (including cholera) and malnutrition represent the main cause of premature mortality in the state. In addition, food security and livelihoods are particularly precarious due to semi-subsistence lifestyles and heavy dependence on the informal sector for income.
Because Borno has been in a protracted crisis since 2009, gender has been a key consideration in the response. However, an outbreak of COVID-19 in Borno continues to disproportionately affect women and girls in a number of ways, as women are more likely to stay home to help with the increased domestic tasks. With the fear of contracting COVID-19, permission granted by men to access health services is decreasing which is negatively affecting women and girls’ access to maternal, sexual and reproductive health services. In addition, Gender Based Violence (GBV) service providers in Borno have reported a heightened risk of increased domestic violence in areas where pre-existing rates of violence against women in IDP camps are already very high. Additionally, with the recent loss of livelihoods, strained humanitarian interventions and inadequate field feedback handling mechanisms, Prevention of Sexual Harassment Exploitation and Abuse (PSHEA) and mitigation is a pressing concern as people in need are left vulnerable in the face of insufficient food and resources. Read More...

IN THE SHADOWS OF THE PANDEMIC: THE GENDERED IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON ROHINGYA AND HOST COMMUNITIES

Since the onset of global COVID-19 pandemic in December, Bangladesh has been in a state of high alert. The first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Bangladesh was recorded on 8 March 2020. By 26 March, containment measures were implemented, impacting an already vulnerable population. As of 13 September there have been 337,520 total cases, with 4,401 in Cox’s Bazar and 179 across all 34 refugee camps. However, it is highly likely that these low case numbers are more indicative of negligible testing than of the actual
spread of the virus; the true incidence of the disease is unknown. COVID-19 and the accompanying containment measures have had a significant impact on women, girls, men and boys, including female sex workers, transgender persons and people with disabilities,
across all camps, exacerbating existing conditions, such as overcrowding, movement across hilly terrain, uneven access to a limited number of WASH and health facilities and inadequate access to protection and hygiene resources. This has hindered the ability of refugees to take the necessary preventive measures to limit infections. The host community faces similar difficulties, and, moreover, the containment measures had an adverse economic impact on both host and refugee communities.
This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) builds on the secondary data analysis done in May 2020 by the Gender Hub, UN Women, CARE and OXFAM. This RGA aims to answer the following research questions:
􀁹 How has COVID-19 impacted women, girls, men and boys and key vulnerable and marginalised groups’ ability to meet their basic needs and entitlements?
􀁹 What achievements made on gender equality and the empowerment of women, girls and LGBTQ+ groups are now at risk of being undone by COVID-19?
􀁹 What new or heightened protection and safety risks are arising from COVID-19?
􀁹 How can women, girls, men and boys, and key vulnerable and marginalised groups articipate and lead in the COVID-19 response?
The research was conducted using primary data collected in Rohingya and host communities in Cox’s Bazar between 15 June and 9 July 2020 to understand the impact COVID-19 has had on age, gender and other social characteristics, and to analyse how the socio-cultural context helps or hinders people’s ability to cope with the crisis. The purpose is to generate evidence to support the design of gender-responsive intervention/strategies for the COVID-19 response in Cox’s Bazar that can be used for advocacy and fundraising purposes. Read More...

Haiti COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis

Suite à la propagation de la pandémie de la COVID-19 en Haïti qui a fait, jusqu’au 11 juillet 2020, 6727 cas de contamination et 139 morts, la population haïtienne, comme cela se passe au niveau mondial, est en train de subir les diverses conséquences de cette crise.
Certainement, celles-ci ne sont pas les mêmes partout dans le monde.
Elles changent avec la réalité socioéconomique des pays. Les retombées de cette crise sont de nature sanitaire, économique, psychologique et sociale. Cependant, les hommes et les femmes et les différentes catégories sociales ne sont pas affectés au même degré, selon leur niveau de vie, leur habilité (physique et mentale), leur orientation sexuelle et probablement d’autres facteurs qui ne sont pas pris en compte dans le cadre de l’enquête. L’Analyse Rapide Genre (ARG) vise à fournir des données et preuves sur les besoins
différenciés des femmes et des hommes par rapport à l'impact de la COVID-19 sur la vie des deux sexes en Haïti, en particulier les femmes qui représentent un groupe vulnérable et font face à de multiples discriminations. Cette démarche permettra de développer advantage des efforts sensibles au genre visant la prévention de la propagation de la COVID-19 par toutes les parties prenantes au niveau national, régional et local. En ce sens, l’ARG prend fondamentalement en compte les inégalités entre les sexes, les inégalités socioéconomiques, et tout ce qui peut engendrer des différences dans la manière dont les groupes sociaux sont affectés par la crise de la COVID-19. L’enquête qui conduit à cette analyse a été réalisée sur les dix départements géographiques du pays. Read More...

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