COVID 19 RGA

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Latin America & the Caribbean – Ciudad Juárez, Mexico

Asylum seekers and migrants traveling through Central America and Mexico to the U.S. border face a range of risks, but women, girls, and other vulnerable groups—such as members of the LGBTQIA community—are confronted with additional threats to their health, safety, and well-being in their countries of origin, countries of transit, and in the U.S. As a result, asylum seekers and migrants who arrive at the U.S.–Mexico border often carry a heavy burden of trauma from experiences with violence. The lack of a system to appropriately support people on the move deepens pre-existing inequalities and exposes already vulnerable groups to additional, unnecessary, risks.
The U.S. Government’s Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), also known as the “Remain in Mexico” policy, returns asylum seekers and migrants from U.S. custody to Mexican territory, compelling them to face months of risk and uncertainty as they wait to complete their asylum processes. The asylum process itself is challenging and unclear, liable to change without warning, and largely opaque to affected populations. The asylum seekers and migrants waiting in Mexico’s Ciudad Juárez city, along the Mexico–U.S. border, face ever-present threats of extortion, gender-based violence (GBV), and kidnappings, which compound their trauma and restrict their freedom of movement and access to critical resources and services. Trauma and fear were the norm of the population that CARE surveyed, not the
exception.
The female asylum-seekers and migrants in Ciudad Juárez that CARE spoke with reported feeling profoundly vulnerable and isolated. They consistently relayed a lack of trust in authorities and an increasing level of anti-migrant sentiment in the city. The lack of either confidential GBV screenings or formal complaint mechanisms left survivors with almost no one to turn to for support and services. Asylum seeking and migrant women, girls, and LGBTQIA individuals who feared for their safety reported remaining inside shelters as much as possible, leaving only when absolutely necessary. In Ciudad Juárez, some asylum seekers and migrants have found refuge in overwhelmed and
underfunded informal shelters. These shelters are largely run by local faith-based organizations, and could meet only a fraction of the need. Despite these efforts, the humanitarian response to the migration crisis is characterized by a haphazard and uncoordinated approach that is devoid of reference to the humanitarian standards that would be the norm in other emergencies. The shelters did not have appropriate intake procedures, such as vulnerability screenings. Few had sufficient water and sanitation facilities for the number of residents, and many shelters housed residents together in common spaces regardless of age or gender, amplifying the risk of harm to vulnerable persons. Asylum seekers and migrants in the shelters frequently lacked information about available health and legal services. Read More...

A STUDY ON THE IMPACT OF COV1D-19 ON WOMEN AND GIRLS IN ETHIOPIA

By August 9, 2021, Ethiopia had reported more than 284,000 COVID-19 cases and 4,426 deaths. Since COVID-19 was first reported in Ethiopia in March of 2021, the impacts of the pandemic, the measures taken to curb COVID-19, and additional political, economic, and environmental crises have severely impacted the population.
Women and girls bear different burdens in this crisis, and emergency responses often overlook the differences
in impacts and needs for women, girls, men, and boys in humanitarian responses. To that end, this research—
with funding from the EUTF (European Union Emergency Trust Fund) provides insight into the impact of COV1D-19 on women and girls in Ethiopia. This insight informs recommendations and guide EUTF partners and other relevant stakeholders in the areas of EUTF interventions. With this objective in mind, four woredas (administrative districts), one refugee camp, and one Industrial Park (IP) were considered as sample areas. These are Sekota Zuria and Gazgibla woredas in Wag Hemra zone of Amhara region; Moyale and Miyo woredas in Borena Zone of Oromia region, Asayita Refugee Camp in Afar region, and Bole-Lemi Industrial Park in Addis Ababa.
This research surveyed 372 women and girls in April 2021. The quantitative surveys covered adult women and girls over the age of 15. It also provides insights into the differences between refugees, Internally Displaced People (IDPs), refugees, and migrants. Qualitative from focus group discussions and key informant interviews also reflects opinions from men and boys. Read More...

DE GÉNERO EN HONDURAS ANÁLISIS RÁPIDO Un panorama ante COVID-19 y Eta / Iota

La población hondureña, multiétnica y esencialmente femenina (51.7%), cohabita en un país que ha sido catalogado como uno de los países del área latinoamericana con mayor desigualdad en cuanto al desarrollo (Índice de desigualdad de género de 0.479 versus un IDH 0.611), y con una brecha de género de 27.8 %, según el Foro Económico Mundial. Esta condición de desigualdad afecta especialmente a las mujeres y niñas, pero también a la población viviendo en situación de pobreza, y a la población que está expuesta a alguna condición de vulnerabilidad ya sea física, psicológica, social, ambiental, económica o estructural.
Como resultado, esta población vive en condiciones de pobreza y desigualdad que influyen directamente en la profundización de aspectos relacionados con la feminización de la pobreza; las limitaciones en el acceso a servicios básicos, recursos, oportunidades económicas y empleo digno (medios de vida); la vulnerabilidad ante la violencia, especialmente la Violencia Basada en Género (VBG); y la continuidad en la brecha de género que existe en cuanto a la participación a nivel organizativo o político.
Esta situación ha sido agravada por las circunstancias generadas en Honduras por la pandemia de la COVID_19, que ha registrado 164,495 casos a nivel nacional, y por la devastación causada por Eta e Iota —que afectó a más de 4 millones de personas—, y que han dejado al descubierto las condiciones de violencia y vulnerabilidad a las que están expuestas las mujeres y niñas en Honduras.
Entre los efectos adversos provocados por ambas crisis, preocupa especialmente aquellos que afectarán a indicadores o condiciones estructurales relacionados con la feminización de la pobreza o que inciden directamente en los factores de riesgo o protectores para la violencia basada en género. Read More...

Análisis Rápido de Género ETA e IOTA Guatemala, diciembre 2020

La situación que enfrenta Guatemala en la actualidad es de una complejidad enorme. Aparte de las condiciones de desigualdad histórica y altos niveles de pobreza que marcan la realidad del país, desde marzo de 2020 se ha tenido que enfrentar los impactos de la pandemia de COVID, y recientemente las emergencias generadas por las tormentas ETA e IOTA, que han azotado a gran parte del territorio nacional. El país se encuentra en una situación excepcional de emergencia sobre emergencia y en donde las acciones de prevención y respuesta han resultado insuficientes para la magnitud de la tragedia.
ONU Mujeres y CARE Guatemala, como parte del Grupo de Trabajo de Género en la Acción Humanitaria del Equipo Humanitario País (EHP), consideran esencial aportar información que permita entender la situación que enfrentan las poblaciones afectadas, y en especial, información con análisis de género, que permita reconocer el impacto diferenciado en las mujeres y niñas, identificando sus necesidades específicas para fortalecer los esfuerzos de mitigación y recuperación, así como para asegurar una respuesta efectiva que garantice sus derechos. Es por ello que realizan este Análisis Rápido de Género (RGA por sus sigla en inglés), como una herramienta para la orientación de la respuesta humanitaria a las tormentas ETA e IOTA, y en el marco de la pandemia de COVID 19.
Objetivo: Identificar y analizar las afectaciones, necesidades e impactos de la emergencia generada por la tormenta ETA en la situación de las mujeres y niñas en Guatemala, y proporcionar recomendaciones prácticas para el trabajo de respuesta y recuperación; cubriendo las áreas más afectadas por la tormenta y priorizadas por CARE y ONU Mujeres, que son los departamentos de Alta Verapaz, Baja Verapaz, Izabal, Chiquimula, Quiché, Huehuetenango, Jalapa, Zacapa y Petén. Read More...

RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS ON THE IMPACT OF THE CORONAVIRUS ON GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE IN FOUR DISTRICTS OF ZAMBIA

Pandemics and outbreaks have differential impacts on women, men, girls and boys. From risk of exposure and biological susceptibility to infection to the social and economic implications, individuals’ experiences are likely to vary according to their biological and gender characteristics and their interaction with other social determinants (UNWomen, 2020). Because of this, global and national strategic plans for COVID-19 preparedness and response must be grounded in strong gender analysis and must ensure meaningful participation of affected groups, including women and girls, in decision-making and implementation.

The Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) was conducted in the four districts of Lusaka, Kalomo, Mpika, and Katete. A mixed method approach was employed to gather data from men, women, boys and girls on the impact of Covid-19 on Gender Based Violence (GBV), health, nutrition and water, sanitation and hygiene. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis North West Syria-Idleb

This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) provides information about the different needs, capacities and coping mechanisms of women, men, boys and girls living in Idleb Governorate. Idleb has long been a safe haven for hundreds of thousands of internally displaced people (IDP) since the early years of the Syrian conflict. The growing population of IDPs overstretched the already limited capacity of the governorate. Since 1 December 2019, almost one million people were forced to flee from their homes to escape from the violence and four out of five people who have been displaced are women, girls or boys.
1 Humanitarian workers in the field raised concerns over the effects of the current situation on women and children, due to displacement, crowded living conditions, the lack of privacy, exploitation, and other factors.
2 Women and girls are disproportionately affected by humanitarian crises due to the exacerbation of already existing gender inequalities and vulnerabilities. An inclusive, effective and successful humanitarian response should understand and address different needs, vulnerabilities, capacities and coping mechanisms of women, men, girls and boys.
For this purpose CARE conducted three Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) in 2014, 2018 and 2019 in North West Syria. The fieldwork of the last RGA was completed in August 2019 and the report was finalized in December 2019. However, as the situation deteriorated after heavy airstrikes and shelling targeted Idleb in mid-December, CARE decided to conduct a new RGA to better understand and respond to the evolving crisis. The objectives of this RGA are to inform program activities and procedures, including how to better target women and girls in ways that are safe, equitable, and empowering within the local context and develop a set of actionable recommendations for the different sectors based on key findings. The RGA used a CARE RGA3 methodology. It included a household survey of 396 participants: 186 women and 210 men. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis, Drought in Afghanistan July 2021

Afghanistan has experienced periodic drought over the past 30 years, but none occurring simultaneously with widespread insecurity and a global pandemic—until now. The combined effects of this “triple crisis” are gravely affecting people throughout the country. Knowing that crises affect different groups of people in different ways, CARE Afghanistan conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) from June–July 2021 to assess the gendered effects of the drought, using primary and secondary data. CARE conducted in-person surveys with 352 participants (63.5% female, 36.5% male) in Balkh, Ghazni, Herat, and Kandahar; focus group discussions with 220 women; and key informant interviews with 20 people (20% women and 80% men). Read More...

Nepal Second Phase COVID-19 RGA

Nepal is currently undergoing the devastating effects of the second wave of COVID-19 pandemic. With the unprecedented surge in COVID-19 infections, the government of Nepal imposed prohibitory orders since April 29 in Kathmandu valley. Similarly, District Administration Offices (DAOs) in 75 out of 77 districts in the country have enforced prohibitory orders to break the chain of COVID-19 spread.1 As the country is reeling under the weight of increasing infections and death rates with fragile health infrastructure, there has been less attention to and evidence on gender and socio-economic impacts of the crisis on the most vulnerable and marginalized populations.
Global evidence from the previous year suggests that the pandemic led to disruption of social, political and economic systems and deepening of pre-existing gender and social inequalities. UN study 2020 highlights that the distribution of effect of any disaster or emergency correlates with the access to resources, capabilities, and opportunities which systematically make certain groups more vulnerable to the impact of emergencies, in particular women and girls.2 Women and girls in Nepal are particularly vulnerable to the immediate and long-term health and socio-economic impacts of the pandemic because of the pervasive inequalities in gender norms and structures.
The RGA conducted by CARE Nepal in partnership with Ministry of Women, Children and Senior Citizens (MoWCSC), UNWOMEN and Save the Children Women 2020 had shown that women’s unpaid care work and unequal division of labor were exacerbated because of closure of schools, public spaces, and care services. In addition, men’s loss of jobs and income and use of savings on gambling and alcohol had led to increased household conflict and women’s vulnerability to domestic violence. The study also revealed that 83 per cent of respondents lost their jobs; the hardest hit among them being women working as daily wage workers. The pandemic had also aggravated intimate partners and gender based violence for women and girls especially from marginalized groups such as Dalits, gender and sexual minorities (LGBTIQ++), women with disabilities, and adolescent girls. Read More...

Fiji Gender, Disability & Inclusion Snapshot COVID-19, TC Yasa and TC Ana

Fiji is facing unprecedented challenges as a result of the compounded effects of COVID-19, Tropical Cyclone (TC) Yasa and TC Ana. TC Yasa was a category five cyclone with winds up to 345 kilometers per hour which made landfall over Fiji’s second largest island, Vanua Levu on 17 December 2020. TC Yasa was not the only major cyclone in 2020 as TC Harold had hit Viti Levu and the islands to the east as a Category Four cyclone on 8 April 2020. In the midst of response and recovery efforts for these cyclones, coupled with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, Fiji was hit again by another tropical cyclone, TC Ana, on 31 January 2021. Read More...

Gender, Disability and Inclusion Analysis for COVID-19 and Tropical Cyclone Harold

When Tropical Cyclone Harold hit on the 2nd April, the Solomon Islands was among the first countries forced to grapple with the complex intersection of COVID-19 and disaster. While the country has managed to contain the spread of COVID-19 and prevent community transmission to date, the pandemic is still having a major impact on everyday life for men, women, boys and girls. Lock-down measures, the abrupt cessation of tourism, severe disruptions to international trade and other flow-on effects of the global pandemic (combined with the effects of TC Harold and pre-existing vulnerabilities) are resulting in widespread income and job losses, heightened stress and tension, increased family violence, displacement, and disrupted access to education, health, and water and sanitation.
If community transmission of COVID-19 occurs, there will be a public health crisis with complex contextual challenges. These include a population dispersed across isolated islands and limited resources, including limited access to quality health services.
The current COVID-19 impacts are disproportionately affecting women, girls and people with disabilities in the Solomon Islands, and this will be exacerbated in the case of a wider COVID-19 outbreak. All humanitarian programming must consider gender roles and responsibilities and the existing patterns of community participation and leadership, in order to ‘do no harm’ and help facilitate a gender and disability inclusive approach to COVID-19 prevention and recovery.

This gender, disability and inclusion analysis has the following objectives:
* To analyse and understand the different impacts that COVID-19 and TC Harold is having on women, men, girls, boys, people living with disabilities and other vulnerable groups in the Solomon Islands;
* To inform humanitarian programming in the Solomon Islands based on the different needs of women, men, boys, girls and people living with disabilities with a particular focus on gender-based violence (GBV) and livelihoods. Read More...

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