RGA

Rapid Gender Analysis Brief Ukrainian Refugees in Moldova

Since the escalation of the war in Ukraine on 24 February 2022, Moldova has been one of the countries in the region hosting people from Ukraine. Communities, as well as local, national and international non-governmental organisations (INGOs), have mobilised to support the refugees with basic needs and services. To date – 28 June – a total of 8,402,336 border crossings from Ukraine have been recorded, with 5,493,437 individual refugees from Ukraine recorded across Europe.1 As of 4 July, 521,549 individuals from Ukraine have arrived in Moldova; 334,903 or 64 per cent are female, of which 25 per cent are girls; and 186,646 or 36 per cent are male, of which 46 per cent are boys2. The majority (92 per cent) of those arriving are Ukrainian and 8 per cent are third country nationals (TCNs).3 No verifiable disability-disaggregated data has been identified and a Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) by Action Aid on 27 April reported that there is no data on Roma populations or the registration of transgender people. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Brief Ukrainian Refugees in Romania

Since the escalation of the war in Ukraine on 24 February 2022, there has been an outpouring of kindness, solidarity and support in the form of basic goods and services from the Government and people of Romania to Ukrainian refugees.
As of 1 June 2022, 1,098,326 Ukrainians refugees have arrived in Romania. Of these, only 84,470 (7.7 per cent) have remained in Romania.1 Of those arriving in Romania, 54 per cent are adult women, 32 per cent are children and 14 per cent are adult men. The top five counties hosting refugees are Bucharest, Constanta, Brasov, Galati and Iasi.
This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) brief highlights the most significant gender and protection issues for refugees from Ukraine in Romania and sets out key recommendations to address them. The RGA brief was conducted jointly by CARE/SERA, the Federation for Child Protection, the Federation for Social Services and Plan International in Romania.

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Rapid Gender Analysis – Northeast Nigeria – Borno, Adamawa and Yobe States

The combined effects of the ongoing insurgency, the COVID pandemic, and a looming food crisis are severely affecting men, women, boys, and girls in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe state in Northeast Nigeria. Women, girls, and at-risk and vulnerable groups are disproportionately affected by these combined crises. CARE and Plan International led this Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) to update the needs of women and girls from those identified by the 2020 joint RGA between CARE, UN WOMEN, and OXFAM. Given the evolving factors and context of the overlapping crises (Food insecurity and COVID-19), This RGA includes the additional dimension of analysis to more significantly including the experience and perspectives of adolescent boys and girls in this complex crisis. Read More...

Conflict Sensitive Rapid Gender Analysis Cabo Delgado, Mozambique

The on-going armed insurgency in Cabo Delgado that started in 2017 and the mass displacement it caused have created a complex humanitarian crisis in one of Mozambique’s poorest regions, Cabo Delgado. Prior to the crisis, Cabo Delgado province already suffered from high levels of poverty and absence of services. This situation has been worsened by the crisis which depleted what little resilience the province’s population had. Host communities find themselves having to share already scarce resources. There are evident signs of solidarity fatigue and tensions between IDPs and host communities result in frequent conflicts.

IDPs in Cabo Delgado are suffering from dire living conditions, extremely limited access to basic services and struggling to meet essential needs. Widespread lack of access to cash and income generating opportunities are causing negative multi-layered gendered impacts on the lives of IDPs. IDPs living in resettlement centres are among
those most vulnerable, women and children making up the majority of residents, where access to resources or income generating opportunities is very limited. Female-headed IDP households have constrained access to land when compared to their male counterparts, making subsistence farming difficult. The combination of these factors
has led to the commodification of humanitarian aid with the sale of part of the food received through humanitarian assistance being a prevalent practice.

While humanitarian assistance has been vital in meeting IDPs’ most urgent needs, there are still immense and persistent needs. Life at resettlement centres is difficult and protection risks abound, particularly for women and girls. Water is scarce and fetching it is an arduous and often dangerous task for women and girls. Access to health care is
limited, including to maternal and sexual and reproductive health services. Reports of sexual exploitation and abuse were frequent and included cases of community leaders requesting money or sex in exchange for guaranteed access to humanitarian aid. Read More...

Ukraine Rapid Gender Analysis (Primary Data) May 2022

"It is no longer very scary whether a rocket will arrive or not from the sea, but it is scary that we will die of starvation.”
The lives of people across Ukraine have been profoundly impacted by the humanitarian crisis brought on by the invasion on 24 February 2022. As of 29 April, 5.5 million refugees have already fled Ukraine,1 and the number of internally displaced people (IDPs) has reached 7.7 million. Of those who have fled the country, it is estimated that 90 per cent are women and children, while most men aged 18–60 are required to stay behind under martial law. Based on current data from the International Organization for Migration, 60 per cent of the adult internally displaced population are female, while 40 per cent are male. As the crisis quickly evolves, so do the needs and priorities of women and men across Ukraine.
This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA), carried out by UN Women and CARE International, seeks to draw attention to the gender dynamics in the humanitarian crisis resulting from the war in Ukraine. The RGA also proposes recommendations for humanitarian leadership, actors and donors to ensure consideration of the gendered dimensions of risk, vulnerability and capabilities in response to this crisis.
The RGA is a progressive publication based on both primary and secondary data sources that compares pre-crisis data with up-to-date information as the situation evolves. This RGA builds upon the RGA Ukraine Brief (http://www.careevaluations.org/evaluation/rapid-gender-analysis-ukraine/) developed by CARE International during the first week of the war and on the UN Women and CARE RGA published 29 March6 based on an analysis of secondary data. For this report, the RGA team reviewed English, Ukrainian and Russian sources and interviewed 179
women and men from local communities across Ukraine, as well as representatives from civil society organizations (CSOs), UN agencies and government bodies. Particular effort was made to ensure that the voices of women and men in vulnerable situations and from different marginalized groups were included. Read More...

CARE RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS IN SYRIA: 11 years of crisis

”Life is mentally and physically exhausting. We can no longer go to hospitals because healthcare and medicines are so expensive. My children eat less. They no longer have milk because I had to sell my cows. We eat a lot less and we no longer eat vegetables because they are expensive” --- Woman living in a camp in Northeast Syria ---
* 90% of people live below the poverty line
* 12.4 million people are food insecure
* 50% of water systems DO NOT WORK Read More...

Analyse du genre, avec un focus en particulier sur les violences basées sur le genre: Diffa, Niger

La présente étude genre mettant un focus particulier sur les Violences Basées sur le Genre (VBG) s’inscrit dans la mise en œuvre du projet bilatéral MARTAWA ZUROMAYE au Niger et au Nigeria: “ visant à renforcer les efforts centrés sur les survivants et informer pour prévenir et répondre , aux Violences Basées sur le Genre (VBG), en particulier les Mutilations Génitales Féminines et ou l’Excision (MFG/E) et le mariage d’enfant et ou forcé (MEF) dans les communautés touchées par les conflits et l’extrémisme violent dans l’Est du Niger et le nord e du Nigeria».
L’étude a combiné la méthode quantitative, probabiliste auprès des ménages à celle non probabiliste et qualitative à travers les focus groupes et des entretiens auprès des informateurs clés (chef de villages et ou quartiers, leaders d’associations de femmes, et jeunes, leaders religieux, leaders d’associations de professionnels, services techniques impliqués dans la mise en œuvre de la Politique Nationale Genre du Niger, etc.). La combinaison de ces deux approches a permis de mesurer l’ampleur du phénomène et d’en déterminer des causes et conséquences sous-jacentes.
Les résultats de l’étude révèlent que le phénomène des VBG à l’instar de toutes les régions du Niger est une réalité dans la région de Diffa et particulièrement dans les six communes d’intervention du projet. La particularité de cette région est liée à la crise humanitaire en cours qui a aggravé certaines violences et fragiliser davantage les mécanismes de réponses existants.
Les réponses à la question qui porte sur les VBG montrent que la résolution de ces cas est plus du ressort des mécanismes communautaires traditionnels ou familiaux que du système de protection formel.
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Rapid Gender Analysis Ukrainian Refugees in Poland

Poland has received the majority of Ukrainian refugees fleeing the conflict. At the time of writing, UNHCR reports that 1,830,711 people have crossed the Ukrainian/Polish border. There has been an outpouring of solidarity in Poland for the Ukrainian refugees. Polish authorities and citizens mobilised swiftly. For example, a law was passed to allow Ukrainians to stay in Poland for 18 months and receive an identification card that facilitates their access to cash assistance and services. Third country nationals (TCNs) have 15 days to find a way out of Poland. The sheer scale and pace of the refugee influx is already creating cracks in the response. Many of these cracks have important gender and protection consequences. This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) researched by CARE highlights the most significant gender and protection issues for Ukrainians in Poland and flags urgent actions required to address them. This RGA of Ukrainian Refugees in Poland builds on the RGA Brief for Ukraine published in February 2022. The RGA is based on observations from site visits to Medyka border crossing, Przemsyl train station, Korczowa Reception Centre, Krościenko border crossing as well as Warsaw train station and accommodation centres; conversations with organisers at these sites – both official and volunteers – and with refugees and Polish Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and Civil Society Organisations (CSOs). The RGA also benefits from consolidating and triangulating information coming out from multiple reports and online coordination meetings. Read More...

She Told Us So (Again)

COVID-19’s impacts around the world are worse than they were in September 2020. Far from a return to “normal,” women and girls CARE works with around the world are saying that their situation continues to get worse as COVID-19 drags on amid other crises. Fati Musa in Nigeria says, “Women have suffered a lot during the pandemic, and we are not yet recovering from this hardship.” 55% of women were reporting gaps in their livelihoods as a priority in 2020. Now that number is 71%. For food insecurity, the number has jumped from 41% to 66%.
Since March of 2020, CARE—and more importantly, the women CARE works with—have been warning that COVID-19 would create special challenges for women and girls, above and beyond what men and boys would face. Tragically, these women were exactly right. What they predicted even before the WHO declared a pandemic has come true. In September 2020, CARE published She Told Us So, which showed women's and men's experiences in the pandemic so far. In March 2022, updated data shows that the cost of ignoring women continues to grow. For more than 22,000 people CARE has spoken to, COVID-19 is far from over. In fact, the COVID-19 situation has gotten worse, not just for women, but for men, too.
Ignoring the voices of women, girls, and other historically marginalized groups has worsened the situation for everyone—not just for women. Men are more than twice as likely to report challenges around livelihoods, food insecurity, and access to health care as they were in 2020, and are three times more likely to report mental health challenges—although they are still only two-thirds as likely as women to report mental health as a priority. As women burn through their coping strategies and reserves, men are also facing bigger impacts over time.

Women have stepped up to the challenge—especially when they get support from each other and opportunities to lead. They are sharing information, preventing COVID-19, and using their resources to support other members of their communities. 89% of women in savings groups in Yemen are putting some of their savings to help others. Women are stepping into leadership roles, "We are women leaders in emergency . . . we have the capacity to say: I have a voice and a vote, I am not going to stay stagnant . . . (participant, Colombia). In Niger, women are saying, “Now we women are not afraid to defend ourselves when a decision does not suit us. We will say it out loud because our rights are known and we know the ways and means to claim our rights.”

Those accomplishments are impressive, but they come at a cost. The constant struggle for their rights, and for even the most basic necessities, is taking its toll. Women are almost twice as likely to report mental health challenges as they were in 2020. As one woman in Iraq describes, “If any opportunity appeared, the man would be the favorite . . . This psychologically affected many women, as they turned to household work which included preparing food and cleaning only.”

To understand these challenges and create more equitable solutions, CARE invests in listening to women, men, and people from marginalized groups to understand the challenges they face, what they need, and the ways in which they lead through crisis. This report represents the voices of more than 22,000 people in 23 countries since September of 2020.
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Rapid Gender Analysis Ukraine

Like all military operations, this one will take its toll on many communities within Ukraine, with distinct effects on women, men, children and marginalised groups. The starkest example is the current contrast between the requirement that Ukrainian men aged 18 to 60 years stay and join the fighting, and media images of mostly women, children and the elderly fleeing the country.
Ukraine has made modest gains on women’s rights in recent years and has a developing state-level ‘gender machinery’. These gains were already under threat from deeply entrenched and persistent gender and discrimination-based inequalities, eight years of conflict in the east of the country, and the gendered social and economic stress wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic. This current crisis, with mass displacement inside and outside Ukraine, will add to that complex situation and put pressure on any gains that have been made.
Humanitarian actors need to build on the advances in gender equality and women’s empowerment by Ukrainian women’s rights, women-led and civil society organisations, and work with them to identify and respond to the different humanitarian needs of women, men, boys, girls and people of all genders. This Rapid Gender Analysis Brief for Ukraine and the Gender in Crisis Ukraine infographic are a first attempt to identify the gender, age, and diversity issues so that humanitarian responses can better meet people’s different needs as the crisis evolves. Read More...

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