COVID 19 RGA

Palestine West Bank/Gaza Rapid Gender Assessment Early Gender Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic Full report

Among those most impacted by COVID19 are women and girls. Across every sphere, from health to the economy, security to social protection, the impacts of COVID-19 are exacerbated for women and girls simply by virtue of their sex. All of these impacts are further amplified in contexts of fragility, conflict, refuge, displacement and emergencies where social cohesion is already undermined and institutional capacity and services are limited.
CARE Palestine West Bank/ Gaza has carried out a Rapid Gender Assessment in order to highlight for policymakers the importance of addressing the gender impacts of this pandemic and social prejudices and gender norms that discriminate against women in the public and private spheres.
This report is intended for policymakers, the Palestinian Authority, civil society organizations—local and international—community members, donors, and the international community at large. It is organized around broad themes and areas of focus of particular importance to those whose programming advances gender equality and reduces gender inequalities. It seeks to deepen the current gender analysis available by encompassing learning from global gender data available for the COVID-19 public health emergency. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis for COVID 19 East, Central and Southern Africa

The impacts – direct and indirect – of public health emergencies fall disproportionally on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups in society. Interconnected social, economic, and political factors pose complex challenges for the ECSA region’s ability to respond to COVID-19. The region already faces significant health challenges that would exacerbate the severity of COVID-19, such as high levels of malnutrition, malaria, anemia, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Access to healthcare in the region is the lowest in the world, thus there is limited capacity to absorb the pandemic1. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the region. Women are at a higher risk for exposure to infection due to the fact that they are often the primary caregivers in the family and constitute 70% of frontline healthcare responders.2 Most women already face limited access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services, and the region struggles with high levels of maternal mortality. For example, mother mortality rates recorded in South Sudan were 1150 per 100 000 live births3. COVID-19 will only increase women’s safety risks and care burdens as health services become stretched and resources shift to COVID-19 responses.
Women and girls are at increased risk of violence during the COVID-19 period. Current rates of violence against women and girls combined with the prevalence of harmful traditional practices leads to increased vulnerability. Income loss and limited mobility, compounded with existing gender role expectations, may contribute to increases in intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence. Read More...

Rapid Analysis: How are female garment factory workers during COVID-19

Based on a rapid needs assessment with female garment workers in Bangladesh on the potential impacts of COVID 19, some key areas of concern are:

56% are concerned about mobility restrictions during lockdown which limits them to buy daily needs
39% faced food shortage/crisis
“35% feel uncertain about salary
9% reported sickness Read More...

Tropical Cyclone Harold Rapid Gender Analysis

Severe Tropical Cyclone Harold crossed land on the northern island of Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu, in the afternoon of the 5th April 2020. With winds up to 235km per hour, TC Harold was graded at Category 5, the largest cyclone to hit Vanuatu since TC Pam 5 years ago on 13 March 2015.1 TC Harold travelled straight through the Sanma, Malampa, Penama and Torba provinces and also affecting the Shepherds group in Shefa province and a total population of 159,474 (78,142 female, 81,332 male ).

Any cyclone in Vanuatu creates difficulties for the population particularly in relation to food security for a country where 75% of the population live in rural areas and are reliant on subsistence agriculture. Vanuatu is currently also responding to the very real threat of the global pandemic COVID-19 and so disaster response mechanisms have to refocus to respond to the effects of a category 5 cyclone affecting around 58% of the nation’s population. TC Harold could disproportionately affect women and girls in the Northern provinces impacting their shelter, food security, nutrition, health and protection. In Vanuatu, women have the prime responsibility to ensure that the family has food, they are also the primary care givers for children, the elderly and the disabled who if displaced are at risk of health and protection issues. Maternal and sexual reproductive health (SRH) needs continue in an emergency, but can be overlooked or deprioritised. Women are also responsible for caring for children especially in response to the COVID-19 school closures in Sanma province so if schools are damaged by the cyclone then this will add an extra burden to women’s already considerable workloads. Read More...

COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis Middle East and North Africa Region

The novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been wreaking havoc on the international community in recent weeks and months, leaving almost no corner untouched. As of 8th April 2020, 1,464,852 cases and 85,397 deaths have been recorded in 212 countries1, including all countries in the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) region with the exception of Yemen. MENA is at a critical stage in containing the pandemic. Some countries have been successful in curtailing the spread by utilizing stringent lockdown measures, while other more fragile and conflict-affected countries, that are less equipped for additional crises, are only beginning to face the inevitable spread of the virus, with incredibly diminished health infrastructures. Widespread conflict, displacement, and migration in the region significantly complicates a controlled response to COVID-19, and extreme water scarcity makes
preventative measures even more challenging.
Women and girls in MENA faced numerous barriers to education, mobility, financial and asset control, and public leadership prior to the pandemic, and any positive gains made recently are at risk. They are impacted by losses in the informal labor market, elevated levels of violence and harassment, and increased burdens of caregiving for out-of-school children, sick and elderly family members.
Levels of psychosocial distress, already high in a volatile region are only escalating, with reductions in men’s roles as providers
being felt in a context of strict gender roles and stigmatization. The potential shift in men’s and boys’ role to provide increased
caregiving should be explored in contextually-appropriate manners. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis COVID-19 Pacific Region, 26 March 2020 [version 1]

Globally, including the Pacific, development and humanitarian settings pose particular challenges for infectious disease prevention and control. For the Pacific, COVID-19 presents a range of contextual challenges. These include multiple islands, vast distances and limited resources. In most Pacific Countries, access to quality health services is limited, due to a lack of infrastructure, equipment, and qualified personnel.

This preliminary Rapid Gender Analysis has the following objectives:
● To analyse and understand the different impacts that the COVID-19 potentially has on women, men,
girls and boys and other vulnerable groups in the Pacific context

● To inform humanitarian programming in the Pacific region based on the different needs of women,
men, boys and girls with a particular focus on Gender Based Violence (GBV), Health, Water,
sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) and Women’s Economic Empowerment. Read More...

Pacific COVID 19 RGA March 26 2020

Novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) is having devastating impacts globally. As of 26th March, 414,179 confirmed cases and 18,440 deaths have been recorded across 178 countries. To date, the Pacific has confirmed cases in Guam, French Polynesia, New Caledonia, Fiji, PNG, and suspected cases in Samoa. In most Pacific countries, access to quality health services including intensive care is limited. Food security and livelihoods are particularly vulnerable to shocks due to semi subsistence lifestyles and a high reliance on the informal sector for income.

A COVID-19 outbreak in the Pacific could disproportionately affect women and girls in a number of ways including adverse impacts to their education, food security and nutrition, health, livelihoods, and protection. Women are the primary care givers in the family and are key health care front line responders placing them at increased risk and exposure to infection. Maternal and sexual reproductive health needs continue in an emergency but risk being de-prioritized. COVID-19 risks increasing women’s workloads, caring for children as schools close and the sick. Additionally, there is a risk of increased family violence in a region where pre-existing rates of violence against women are already very high.

Men's gender roles and norms need to be taken into account in order to ensure that men are properly targeted to help reduce their vulnerability to illness and to leverage their roles as leaders and decision makers in the home and in the community to help prevent the spread of the disease. Read More...

Australia COVID19 RGA April 1 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic is not just a healthcare crisis but is having far-reaching impacts on the economy and the social fabric of countries. Australia is no different. While the proportion of COVID-19 cases in males and females is roughly equal, various groups are impacted differently. Women and people with disabilities and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who have poorer health outcomes are at a higher risk of infection. Barriers in accessing information and medical and other health services exacerbate this higher risk. Women make up almost 80 per cent of the health and social assistance industry, and this means more women than men will be on the frontline of the response to COVID-19, putting them at higher risk of exposure.
The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted the Australian economy, with the Australian Government estimating one million people could be made unemployed. The impact on the economy is compounded by the destruction of local businesses and homes during the recent bushfire season. Four-fifths of employed Australians (80 per cent) work in industries providing services, such as health care, education, and retail. These sectors are the hardest hit by the economic impacts of COVID-19. Many part-time and casual workers, of which women comprise the majority, are most likely to be laid off or given shorter hours during the crisis and post-crisis. Unpaid caring labour falls more heavily on women because of the existing structure of the workforce and gendered social norms. Women are paid less and perceived to have more flexibility from doing casual or part-time jobs. As a result, women will be expected to undertake unpaid care work. Read More...

Global COVID 19 Rapid Gender Analysis April 1

On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organisation classified COVID-19 as a pandemic.1 Disease outbreaks affect women, girls, men, boys, and persons of all genders differently, to say nothing of the wide variety of at-risk and marginalised groups. The compounding complexities of development and humanitarian contexts can have disproportionate effects on women and girls, as well as those at-risk and vulnerable groups. CARE International identified the need to highlight the gender and intersectional impacts of the COVID-19 crisis.
To achieve this, CARE first developed a policy brief to review lessons learned from previous public health emergencies. CARE then adapted its Rapid Gender Analysis toolkit to develop the Global Rapid Gender Analysis on COVID-19, conducted in consultation with the International Rescue Committee (IRC). This report is for humanitarians working in fragile contexts that are likely to be affected by the COVID-19 crisis. It is organised around broad themes and areas of focus of particular importance to those whose programming advances gender equality and reduces gender inequalities. It seeks to deepen the current gender analysis available by encompassing learning from global gender data available for the COVID-19 public health emergency. Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all