Food and Nutrition Security

‘IF WE DON’ T WORK, WE DON’ T EAT’ Syrian Women Face Mounting Food Insecurity a Decade into the Conflict

Ten years ago, the lives of many Syrians changed profoundly as anti-government demonstrations escalated into violent conflict between forces allied to the Government of Syria and armed opposition groups. The resulting humanitarian crisis is one of the worst of our time – 6.7 million Syrians remain internally displaced; an estimated 13 million people are in need1 and 12.4 million live with food insecurity.

In recent months, the situation has deteriorated even further as the COVID-19 pandemic, mass displacements, natural
disaster, economic collapse and ongoing hostilities have combined to create a situation wherein households are
finding it increasingly difficult to meet their basic needs, including for food.

Average food prices in Syria increased by 236% in 2020 – and food prices are more than 29 times higher than the five year pre-crisis average, causing many families to resort to negative coping strategies. This includes eating fewer
or smaller meals to get by. Furthermore, due to the loss or reduced capacity of male heads of household to death, injury, disappearance or emigration in search of work, many Syrian women are now the sole or primary breadwinners for their families, bearing the full burden of providing for their families with limited livelihood opportunities. About 22% of Syrian households are now headed by women; this is up from only 4% prior to the conflict. Even in households where the male head of household is working in some capacity, dire economic circumstances have pushed women to find some source of income to help with household expenses. In both cases, women are thrust into the ‘provider’ role in a way that most had not previously experienced. Read More...

DESARROLLO ECONÓMICO, SOCIAL Y RURAL INTEGRAL EN COMUNIDADES INDÍGENAS DE LA PROVINCIA DE NAPO

El objeto a evaluar es el proyecto “Desarrollo económico, social y rural integral en comunidades indígenas de la provincia de Napo” (Para los fines de esta evaluación se resumirá de la siguiente manera el nombre del proyecto: “DESRICI de la Provincia de Napo”). El Proyecto es llevado a cabo por Maquita Cushunchic y financiado a través del Ministerio Federal de Cooperación Económica y Desarrollo de Alemania (BMZ) y CARE Alemania. Su localización geográfica es la Provincia de Napo en el cantón Tena y las parroquias de Ahuano y Chontapunta. Se evalúa el periodo completo de ejecución entre el 2017 y 2020 y corresponde a la evaluación final sobre cómo el diseño, proceso y ejecución han contribuido al logro de los tres resultados propuestos en la formulación de la intervención Read More...

SUAAHARA II GOOD NUTRITION PROGRAM Annual Survey Year 3

Nepal’s reductions in maternal and child undernutrition since the mid-1990s have been remarkable, but the high burden persists. Among children under five years, 36% are stunted, 10% are wasted, and 27% are underweight. Additionally, 17% of women of reproductive age (WRA, 15-49 years) are underweight while 41% are anemic (Nepal DHS Survey, 2016). The Government of Nepal (GoN) is rolling out the second phase of their national Multi-Sector Nutrition Plan (MSNP), with support of external development partners (EDPs). Suaahara II (SII) is a USAID-funded multisectoral nutrition program, aligned with Nepal’s MSNP, and is being implemented in all communities of 42 of Nepal’s 77 districts from April 2016 to March 2021. SII’s overall aim is to reduce the prevalence of stunting, wasting, and underweight among children under five years of age and to reduce the prevalence of anemia among WRA and children 6-59 months of age. SII works across thematic areas including nutrition, health and family planning (FP), water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), agricultural/homestead food production (HFP), and governance, using a gender equality and social inclusion (GESI) approach for all interventions.
SII has a large, rigorous monitoring, evaluation, and research system. Annual monitoring surveys, a key component of SII’s monitoring system, primarily serve to monitor progress over time related to key SII inputs, outputs, and outcomes in intervention areas. The first SII annual monitoring survey was conducted between June to September 2017 among a representative sample of households with a child under five years by New ERA, a local survey firm. At the household level, mothers were the primary survey respondents. A primary male (or female, if male unavailable) household decision maker, the youngest child’s grandmother, and an adolescent girl (10-19 years), if residing in the same household, were also interviewed. Data was also collected from Female Community Health Volunteers (FCHVs) and 1 key informant from each health facility in the sampled areas. The household surveys included questions related to exposure, knowledge and practices for each of the thematic areas mentioned above. Anthropometric status was assessed for all female respondents and children. FCHV and health facility surveys collected information on exposure to training, motivation, supervision, and work-related activities. In 2017, the final survey sample included 3,642 households. Read More...

Women’s involvement in coffee agroforestry value- chains Financial training, village savings and loans associations, and decision power in Northwest Vietnam

Colleagues in Vietnam and at CCAFS and the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) carried out some research on our work in the coffee value chain (TEAL).

This study assessed VSLA impacts and related training on gender equality and women’s access to coffee markets in an ongoing coffee- project in northwest Vietnam.

Applying the Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (WEAI), women rated perceptions of their decision-making over a range of 18 tasks related to household and agricultural responsibilities and use of income and social activities (over 18 months). There were improvements in decision-making power in categories with previously low participation and increased sharing of domestic responsibilities (biggest gains were decision-making over large purchases and use of income). Also found that husbands to women in the study embraced more equal sharing of responsibility and decision-making with their wives.
This report is 40 pages long. Read More...

Growing Nutrition for Mothers and Children (GROW) Project in Ethiopia – End Line Household Survey Report

CARE has implemented the Growing Nutrition for Mothers and Children (GROW) Project in Ethiopia between 2017 and 2019. The goal of GROW was to improve the nutritional status of women of reproductive age and boys and girls under 5 years. This endline study was conducted to establish values for outcome level indicators for the project and assess change and impact of the project by comparing data from baseline to end line values. This evaluation employed a cross-sectional study design. The study includes a household survey and anthropometric measurements of women and children to assess their nutritional status. The study covered 39 project intervention Kebeles in 14 Woredas of East and West Hararghe and Afar. A total of 1291 women, 974 men, and 1291 children were included in the study. Read More...

A Win-Win for Gender and Nutrition: Testing A Gender-Transformative Approach From Asia In Africa

Since 2016, CARE Burundi has partnered with Great Lakes Inkingi Development (GLID), RBU2000, and the University of Burundi/Agronomy department and the Africa Center for Gender, Social Research and Impact Assessment to implement and test the EKATA approach – Empowerment through Knowledge And Transformative Action – integrated into an agriculture program to test its effectiveness against a typical gender mainstreaming approach (Gender Light) and a Control (with agriculture interventions only) in a modified randomized control trial, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The Win-Win project randomly assigned collines to EKATA, Gender Light and Control groups. Baseline data was collected in 2016 – Midterm was conducted in 2018, and end-line data was collected in 2020 from a random sample of 1,315 households and 1,849 individuals (1,059 female heads of household, and 790 male heads of household). Additionally, the project conducted 36 individual in-depth interviews, disaggregated by sex and age – and male- or female-headed households – at baseline, midline and end-line. This data was complimented with focus group discussions (FGDs). The evaluation looked at the impact of EKATA compared with Gender
Light and Control on several areas, including rice production (which was the main focus crop), income and wealth, gender equality and women’s empowerment. The cost-effectiveness of these approaches also was analyzed. The evaluation used the project level Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (Pro-WEAI) to measure changes in gender equality and women’s empowerment. Read More...

Programme Sante USAID/Kenya Ciwara Rappor D’Analyse de L’Enquete D’Evaluation Finale

The program is part of Strategic Objective 6 (SO 6) which aims to increase the use of high impact services and improve health behaviors / practices. These services relate to the survival of the child (vaccination, malaria, diarrheal diseases, acute respiratory infections, nutrition and vitamin A). The final evaluation takes place two years after the mid-term evaluation and four years after the baseline evaluation. The report is 55 pages long. Read More...

Evaluation Finale du Project USAID/Nutrition WASH

The Mission of the United States Agency for International Development in Mali (USAID / Mali) through the NGO Care Internationale entrusted Kurugan Fuga Consulting with the final evaluation of the USAID / Nutrition and Hygiene project in the regions of Koulikoro, Ségou and Mopti in Mali. At the end of this program, which spanned a 5-year implementation period from October 2014 to September 2018 extended in 2019, its final evaluation was required. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of the IRP's integrated nutritional strategy combining nutrition, agriculture, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) to improve the nutritional status of pregnant and breastfeeding women and children of less than 2 years. The report is 80 pages long. Read More...

Evaluation a mi-parcours du Programme d’Amenagement du Delta Interieur du Niger (PADIN-II)

The Development Program of the Inner Niger Delta (PADIN-II) is the result of a request from the National Directorate of Rural Engineering (DNGR, for the Ministry of Agriculture) to respond to the planning guidelines of the Program. of Sustainable Development of the Inner Niger Delta (PDD-DIN). PADIN-II is designed by the NGO CARE and the DNGR, with the involvement of members of the Regional Committee for the Orientation, Coordination and Monitoring of Development Actions (CROCSAD) of the Mopti Region. This five-year program (2013-18) is funded by the Embassy of the Netherlands in Bamako. CARE-Mali is implementing it in 24 Communes in the Mopti Region. It is preceded by PADIN-I (2011-13) and the Food Security through Promotion of Irrigation project (SAPI 2007-11), for which CARE was also responsible. PADIN is therefore part of a history of the development and management of wetlands in the Mopti region. The report is 85 pages long. Read More...

Evaluation finale du Programme d’Amenagement du Delta Interieur du Niger (PADIN-II)

The Inner Niger Delta Development Program (PADIN-II) in the Mopti Region has been implemented in 24 Communes classified as vulnerable in four Circles of the Mopti Region in Mali. The program, lasting more than five years (Sept. 2013-June 2019), was implemented by a number of stakeholders: technical services and governorate, municipal authorities, NGOs and farmers' organizations. The NGO CARE-Mali was the main operator of the program, which was funded by the Embassy of the Netherlands in Bamako to the amount of 7.87 billion FCFA. The goal was to improve the living conditions of 20,000 households (or 120,000 people) of agro-pastoralists and fishermen in the Inner Niger Delta (DIN) and Sourou. The report is 104 pages long. Read More...

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