Food and Nutrition Security

Ghana: Bringing the inputs one step closer to the farmers

Worldwide, the Ukraine conflict is leading to unparallel price hikes in food, fuel, and fertilizer. Like most countries in the world, Ghana is being impacted by these shocks. In simple words, Ghana is already on the path to growing less food this year. Farmers are not producing enough food crops, which affects their households’ livelihoods, and impacts women and children. To understand more about the current impact of the global food crisis on smallholder farmers and their coping mechanisms in the local context, CARE engaged with farmers in Ghana. Read More...

Food Security and Gender Equality: A synergistic understudied symphony

As women keep feeding the world, we must give them the right space in our data collection methods and analysis to make the gaps they encounter visible and find solutions that include those. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore the correlation between gender inequality values and food security scores worldwide combined with existing literature and rich studies on the links between gender and food in specific contexts to create powerful insights on the need that the world needs to produce, publish, and use more consistent data on gender equality and food. Read More...

The impact of commodity price hikes on poor and extreme poor households – SHOUHARDO III

Between June and July month, the SHOUHARDOIII program conducted its annual Beneficiary Based Survey (BBS) and captured the impact of recent price hikes on the life of the program participants. The SHOUHARDOIII program reaches over 475,228 members of 168,535 poor and extremely poor households in Bangladesh. The findings of the annual survey confirm that households are experiencing an increase in the price of essential commodities over the last six months. Read More...

Nigeria: VSLA Women and the Global Food Crisis

CARE Nigeria implemented discussions with Village Savings and Loans Associations (VLSA) engaged in the Food and Agriculture Organization, and CARE, where they implemented the Livelihood and Resilience Building Project in Mairi of Jere Local Government (LGA). The participant’s cohort was integrated by 10 women. The main goal of the discussions was to understand the impact of the current food crisis and how it is affecting food security, inflation, and raising the costs of living for small-scale farmers. Also, the project team attempted to understand how the current food crisis is aggravated by climate and by the 12-year protracted armed conflict in northeast Nigeria. Read More...

Global Hunger Crisis: Guatemala, Honduras, and Ecuador

Climate change, conflict, COVID-19, and gender inequality impacts food security globally. Together with the Ukraine conflict, the food crisis across the world is worsening. And, smallholder farmers, who already struggled to produce enough food because of climate change, are now facing serious impacts because they can no longer afford inputs for production. Read More...

Sierra Leone: Smallholder farmers and the global food crisis

The war between Russia and Ukraine has led to unprecedented price shocks in food, energy, and fertilizer globally due to the centrality of both countries in the functionality of these markets. Like in most countries in the world, Sierra Leone is severely affected by these shocks. Prices of food and non-food commodities have also increased exponentially.

Poor smallholder farmers—who already struggled to produce enough food—are facing severe impacts because they can no longer afford inputs and related services. Food security, especially among the rural population who depend largely on farming as a primary source of livelihood, is therefore of grave concern. Farmers are reporting that they are only planting half the field size, the price of seeds and fertilizer has more than doubled, and "low production levels of food crops is inevitable."

To understand the current impact of the global food crisis on smallholder farmers and their (farmers) resilience in the local context, CARE engaged participants of its Solar Harnessed Entrepreneurs project in two communities in the north of the country. The aim is to obtain first-hand information on affordability of inputs, impact of these shocks especially on women farmers and farmers’ coping mechanisms in the wake of the current global crisis.
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Harvesting the Outcomes of SHOUHARDO III’s Local Service Provision Model of Micro Seed Dealers and Micro Seed Retailers (MSD/MSR)

SHOUHARDO III aims to ensure sustainable agriculture and livelihood for its beneficiaries. Part of this entailed forming community groups consisting of both men and women farmers, as well as increasing their capability in terms of quality seeds, agricultural technology, input and output markets, and connections with public and private actors. Read More...

SHOUHARDO III – Capturing the changes and impacts of reformed Community Groups

SHOUHARDO III program established the Community-level Thematic Groups in the inception year of the program in 2016 to facilitate the large-scale program interventions on Agriculture and Livelihoods (Farmers’ Field Business School/FFBS), Health and Nutrition (Maternal Child Health and Nutrition/MCHN groups and Mother Groups), Women’s Empowerment (Empowerment Knowledge and Transformative Action/EKATA), and Governance (Village Development Committees) with additional components represented by the youth groups and Village Savings and Loan Associations (VSLA). These groups were reformed into gender and age-specific Community Groups (CG) following the midterm evaluation in 2018 that provided recommendations on putting in place a sustainability strategy. Read More...

Baseline Study of the Resilience Food Security Activities (RFSAs) in Niger

This report is a baseline study of three Resilience Food Security Activities (RFSAs) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance (legacy Office of Food for Peace [FFP] in Niger. Part of the Resilience in the Sahel-Enhanced (RISE) initiative, the RFSAs in Niger are: Girma in the Zinder region, implemented by Catholic Relief Services; Hamzari in the Maradi region, implemented by CARE; and Wadata in the Zinder region, implemented by Save the Children. The RFSAs aim to address critical challenges in food security, nutrition, and poverty, and to improve the resilience of households and communities. The baseline study included a representative population-based survey (PBS) of 2,325 households (775 households per RFSA area). Data collection was scheduled for May–April 2020 but due to the COVID-19 pandemic fieldwork was suspended until local regulations and conditions indicated that face-to-face interviewing could safely resume with COVID-19 mitigation procedures in place. The survey was conducted in September 2020 and ended at the start of the harvest period in October 2020. The sample was selected using a multi-stage clustered sampling design to provide a statistically representative sample of the three RFSA areas. The questionnaire was streamlined from the standard FFP questionnaire for a non-permissive environment. Estimates of impact-level indicators pertaining to poverty and anthropometry were expected to be derived from the RISE II baseline survey, scheduled to take place a few months after the RFSA baseline survey. Read More...

My Forest, My Livelihood, My Family program (FUTURES) Baseline report

The FUTURES—My Forest, My Livelihood, My Family program (FUTURES) serves communities in the Yayu Coffee Forest Biosphere Reserve (YCFBR) located in Southwestern Ethiopia, in Oromia Regional State. The YCFBR encompasses the Hurumu, Yayo, Bilo Nopa, Alge-Sachi, and Doreni woredas of Illu-Abba Bora zone and Chora woreda of Buno Bedele zone and includes protected forest area as well as designated areas for economic activities like coffee and spice production, commercial forest plantations and eco-tourism, and areas where many traditional and modern agricultural practices take place.
Households in the area depend on a combination of small-scale agricultural and forest management systems dominated by traditional agronomic practices and characterized by a lack of crop diversity and low productivity. Deforestation, degradation, and increased loss of biodiversity are major concerns for sustainable agricultural and livelihood practice in the region. Social, gender, and cultural barriers have historically limited women’s and youth’s engagement in agricultural and economic sectors. High rates of early and forced marriage, and limited availability of reproductive health and family planning services, especially youth-friendly services, may further limit women and youth from participating meaningfully in agricultural practice and livelihood generation. Government services and local civil society organizations in the area operate at a limited capacity, and their offices are male-dominated and do not meaningfully incorporate a gendered approach to their work (Gebrehanna and Seyoum, 2020).
The three-year FUTURES project was launched in April 2021 to address many of the health, environment, and livelihood concerns of the YCFBR region. The project is implemented by CARE Ethiopia and its three local partners, Oromia Development Association (ODA), Environment and Coffee Forest Forum (ECFF), and Kulich Youth Reproductive Health and Development Organization (KYRHDO). The FUTURES project evaluation, funded by USAID, and led by Data for Impact (D4I), aims to understand the impact of the FUTURES project on key health, agricultural, and livelihood and conservation behavioral outcomes, and to contribute to knowledge about the implementation of cross-sectoral programs, including monitoring, evaluations, and learning (MEL) of such programs. Read More...

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