health systems

Gender Analysis: Prevention and Response to Ebola Virus Disease in the Democratic Republic of Congo

The latest epidemic of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has rapidly evolved into the second largest outbreak in history. Deployed in an operational environment characterised by ongoing volatility, EVD prevention, treatment and containment efforts have faced multiple difficulties. Mistrust of EVD responders by local communities, coupled with targeted attacks on healthcare workers and facilities, have proved to be serious operational challenges. Despite a gressive efforts to stamp out the disease across three provinces, the virus has continued to spread and is responsible for the deaths of 3,303 people to date (as of 24th November 2019) with an overall fatality rate of 67%.

However, these casualty numbers hide the underlying characteristics of the EVD crisis. The reality is that the majority of fatalities consist of women (56%), and children (28%). Adult men constitute just 11% of EVD deaths. Yet fatalities alone do not fully demonstrate the differential ways in which men, women, boys and girls are exposed and experience the immediate risks and longer-term consequences of the disease. Socially prescribed cultural norms, attitudes and practices in relation to gender and age dictate how individual women, men, girls and boys are differentially impacted by the EVD crisis. It is therefore critical to better understand the socio-behavioural underpinnings to EVD aetiology. In light of the gendered dimensions of the EVD crisis, CARE International in DRC commissioned a Gender Analysis of the EVD crisis in North Kivu in order to provide information about the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, girls and boys during the EVD crisis. Read More...

FINAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REPORT OF THE PROJECT “ZIKA RESPONSE IN ECUADOR AND PERU”

This document is the final report of the performance evaluation of the binational project Zika Response in Ecuador and Peru, implemented in Ecuador and Peru by CARE from 2016 to 2019. The main objectives of the project were to strengthen community, local and national capacities to respond to the outbreak of Zika virus and other vector-borne diseases, as well as to improve regional and national efforts to reduce Zika transmission rates.

The evaluation of the project in Ecuador was carried out in the intervention zones of 10 cantons of the provinces of El Oro, Manabí and Esmeraldas, between August and September 2019; in Peru, in 20 districts of 10 provinces of the departments of Tumbes, Piura, Lambayeque, and Cajamarca. After the elaboration of the work proposal and the methodological design of the evaluation, secondary information was collected and primary information was collected at field through interviews, focus groups and social mapping (in Ecuador), and a Likert scale survey (in Peru). The evaluation was framed in five blocks: General Aspects, Community Mobilization, Community-Based Surveillance, Social and Behavioral Change, and Inter-Institutional Planning and Coordination.

The main findings of the evaluation determine that the project achieved, for the most part, the objectives of the project, having as its main achievement the facilitation of inter-institutional coordination of the different actors in the territory. In Peru, the experience of community-based vector control, supported by technological and communications innovations, stands out. In both countries, the project successfully mobilized the community to carry out prevention strategies against Zika and increase knowledge of the risks of this type of disease, as well as useful individual and collective strategies for its prevention. Read More...

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