Inclusive Governance

WAYREP Baseline Report


WAYREP’s overall objective is to “Strengthen the resilience of refugee and Ugandan women, girls and youth to live a life free from violence (LFFV) in Uganda”. WAYREP focuses on women and girls’ empowerment within the context of some of Uganda’s most pressing current challenges such as rapid urbanization, regular and high rates of displacement and migration across and within Uganda’s borders and a very young and largely unemployed population. In 2020, this fragile context was further exacerbated with the outbreak of the Coronavirus pandemic (COVID 19) not only in terms of its health implications, but also in terms of its impact on livelihoods, safety and security. WAYREP is built on the hypothesis that Gender Based Violence (GBV) has two main drivers: gender inequality and poverty. This is exacerbated by displacement whether as a refugee or as an urban dweller coming from rural Uganda. WAYREP’s theory of change therefore states that: if refugee and vulnerable Ugandan women and girls have access to dignified livelihood opportunities, and if the gender, social and cultural norms that perpetuate GBV are challenged and minimized, then the likelihood of resorting to negative coping mechanisms - including GBV like early and forced marriage or commercial sex - will significantly reduce and women and girls’ self- reliance will increase.
The project seeks to achieve four result areas namely;
1. Enhanced sustainable and dignified livelihood for women and youth
2. Reduction of the acceptance of GBV
3. Enhanced psychosocial support to survivors of GBV
4. Increased accountability of the Government of Uganda (GoU) on the implementation of relevant
frameworks for women and girls’ protection and rights
The project is being implemented in Gulu Municipality (Pece and Bardege Divisions), Arua Municipality (River Oli Division, Omugo Settlement zones 4, 5, and 6) and Omugo Sub-county (in Obi, Angazi, Anufira, Duku, Boora and Ndapi Parishes).
This report is 81 pages long. Read More...

BASELINE SURVEY REPORT WOMEN’S VOICES AND LEADERSHIP PROJECT (CENTRAL EQUATORIA, EASTERN EQUATORIA & JONGLEI STATES)

CARE South Sudan, with funding from Global Affairs Canada, implements the Women’s Voice and Leadership (WVL) project in the Eastern Equatorial, Central Equatorial and Jonglei states. WVL is a four-year project that supports the capacity and activities of local and national women-led organizations (WLO) seeking to empower women and girls, advance the protection of women and girls’ rights and achieve gender equality.
The baseline survey purposely informs the establishment of realistic and achievable targets and provides a point of reference against which progress on or towards the achievement of outcomes will be assessed, monitored and evaluated. This will also inform project implementation performance review process, maintain accountability by informing what difference the project is making and provide justification to the stakeholders for programme intervention. The study was also used to assess the political economy that underpins the operating environment for WLOs. The findings and recommendations of the baseline will help to provide strategic and operational guide to shape the implementation process. Read More...

WOMEN’S VOICE AND LEADERSHIP (WVL) KENYA Project Baseline

This report presents a synthesis of findings from the baseline evaluation carried out for the Women’s Voice and Leadership program in Kenya. This program is funded by Global Affairs Canada (GAC) and is being delivered by CARE Canada, CARE Kenya, Uraia Trust, The Centre for Rights Education and Awareness (CREAW), Community Advocacy and Awareness (CRAWN Trust) and Urgent Action Fund (UAF- Africa). The program’s goal is to support the capacity and activities of local and national women’s organizations and movements seeking to empower women and girls, advance the protection of women’s and girls’ rights, and achieve gender equality with the ultimate outcome being the “increased enjoyment of human rights by women and girls and the enjoyment of gender equality in Kenya”. The overall objectives of the baseline were to provide: 1) the baseline data for the WVL Kenya project indicators against which progress will be measured, and 2) provide recommendations on improving the current project Performance Measurement Framework (PMF) and Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) Plan.
The baseline employed a mixed methodology approach, combining both quantitative and qualitative approaches. The study was undertaken in a feasible manner given the COVID 19 reality and associated safety precautions, limitations on movement and convening. The study findings drew analysis from secondary data, self-assessment questionnaires, key informant interviews and quantitative interviews through phone calls. The study engaged a wide range of stakeholders including: women’s rights organizations (WROs), women rights’ network members, staff of the 4 partner organizations and CARE staff. All the network members engaged were female as well as 83% of representatives of WROs and partners. Slightly above half (53%) of WROs representatives engaged were organization leaders while 86% of partner representatives were staff. Read More...

ENDLINE EVALUATION COVER PAGE Adolescent Empowerment Project (AEP) IN KAJIADO & MUKURU

CARE implemented the Adolescent Empowerment Project (AEP) in Kenya, funded through the Patsy Collins Trust Fund Initiative from 2015 to 2020. The project aimed to empower adolescent girls and boys from chronically insecure households to fully exploit their potential, take advantage of opportunities, and fulfil their aspirations. Over a 5-year implementation period, the project targeted adolescents (aged 10-19) in urban Mukuru (within Nairobi county) and rural Kajiado county with a suite of activities and services delivered through partners Hope Worldwide Kenya (HWWK) and Neighbors Initiative Alliance (NIA). Inputs were designed to expand life choices and empower participants to become engaged citizens and include activities on leadership skills development, adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ARSH), economic empowerment, ICT skills, and quality education.
This report is 70 pages long. Read More...

“Political Economy Analysis for food and nutrition security and community resilience, and analysis of conflicts affecting food, nutrition and income security in Harande program area” Integrated Report

The major findings of this twofold study firstly highlight peaceful as well as contentious coexistence between formal institutions put in place with decentralization and informal and customary institutions managing resources essential to food and nutrition security. Stemming from a centuries-old tradition based on the right of the first occupant, the paramount importance of lineage and family, strict intra-community differentiation of socio- professional categories both in the management of pastoral resources and fisheries in Delta flooded areas and farming in dry areas, these customary institutions are still greatly relevant and legitimate in the eyes of the different communities today. Conversely, these communities often find it difficult to grasp the legal principles and norms (State land domain, local communities’ responsibilities, local governance, the role of deconcentrated State officials etc.) supporting local governments’ role in resource management. Consequently, the implementation of the Harande Program should be guided by the socio-cultural specifities of the target areas and should take into account the customary conflict management mechanisms as well as those promoted by civil society organizations which are the most validated by populations in the region of Mopti. The report is 140 pages long. Read More...

Supporting Meaningful Civic Engagement for Improved Accountability by Leveraging Digital Technologies Baseline Assessment

The baseline assessment for the “Supporting meaningful civic engagement for improved accountability by leveraging digital technologies” project was conducted to develop values for baseline indicators and provide evidence with regards to the degree of satisfaction and level of dialogue target beneficiary groups have with public service providers. Data from this baseline assessment will enable comparisons between start, during the course of the project and at the end of project. Donor for this project is the European Union via European Instrument for Democracy and Human Rights (EIDHR).
The overall objective for this Action is to develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels and ensure public access to information and fundamental freedoms. The overall objectives will be achieved through activities, which empower young ethnic minority community citizens to demand the government for more participatory, transparent, responsive and accountability in leveraging digital technologies. We will use a digital scorecard, which is currently tested and will be applied in 2021 in this project. Report is 53 pages long. Read More...

Beyond Economic Empowerment The Influence of Savings Groups on Women’s Public Participation in Fragile and (post) Conflict-Affected Settings Every Voice Counts

Women’s meaningful participation and influence in public processes in fragile and (post) conflict-affected settings (FCAS) is not only necessary to achieve inclusive development but is a fundamental human right. Unfortunately, in most contexts, men are overrepresented in decision-making and women do not have equal voice in the decisions that affect their lives. Some evidence suggests that the economic empowerment of women opens up opportunities for them to participate in public decision-making processes. One such means for economic empowerment in FCAS is savings groups. Savings groups are small, community-based groups that can provide members a safe space to save money, take small loans, and make investment decisions. Globally, women have made advances in improving their income and access to savings, as well as increased their entrepreneurial endeavours as a result of their participation in savings groups. Research also shows that women’s participation in savings groups improves their confidence, skills, and ability to influence household decision-making. This prompts the question: do these benefits of women’s participation in savings groups extend into the public sphere? In other words, does women’s participation in savings groups influence their public participation1 and decision-making? Through a mixed methods investigation across five countries (18 villages) in Africa and South Asia (Burundi, Mali, Niger, Pakistan, and Sudan), using CARE’s Gender Empowerment Framework, this research investigated the differences in outcomes between women who participate in savings groups under three CARE programmes: Every Voice Counts (EVC), Women on the Move (WoM), and Latter Day Saints Charities (LDS) Recovery Support for Vulnerable Households programmes [74 pages]. Read More...

RAPPORT DEFINITIF BASELINE PROSPER II Thriving Cocoa Community Cargill

Cette étude dont l’objectif était de déterminer la situation actuelle des ménages producteurs de cacao dans les treize (13) nouvelles communautés sélectionnées du Projet PROSPER II sur les quatre (04) axes d’intervention du projet : (i) la gouvernance communautaire ; (ii) l’inclusion financière et des compétences entrepreneuriales des femmes ; (iii) la diversification des sources de revenus des ménages agricoles incluant la nutriton ; (iv) les solutions alternatives communautaires au travail des enfants ; afin que puissent être mesurés les changements qui interviendront après les trois (03) prochaines années de mise en œuvre, en utilisant la même approche, a démontré que la situation actuelle desdits ménages n’est guère réluisante. C’est ce que l’analyse des résultats combinés aux sources sécondaires et primaires notamment la collecte de terrain et les discussions de groupe nous permet d’indiquer. [97 pages]. Read More...

CARE Mali Harande FY20 Participants Based Survey PaBS Annual Report

Harande program, implemented the annual monitoring survey through the M&E Unit and Program team supported by the CARE USA Regional M&E Advisor. The methodology is based on the Participants Based Survey (PaBS survey) guidelines expressed in Feed the Future PABS guideline1. It has been conducted using the latest BHA participants-based survey methodology guidance. All fourteen (14) annual survey indicators have been computed using weighting procedures. Except for, gross margin, value of incremental and yield indicators that used more complex formulas, standard errors and confidence intervals have been established for the remaining indicators. FY20 Data collection has been made during the period of July 15 - 29, 2020 and methodology comply with the PaBS FtF guideline as recommended by BHA. The PaBS have been implemented in the following four (4) communes: Dourou, Dandoli, Douentza and Koubewel Koundia, and a total of 48 villages have been reached through these communes for data collection.

A total of 1,733 participants have been sampled for this PaBS. Within them 11% refused the survey and 72% were female. That bring the total participant who responded to the survey in all the frames without double counting to 1,529. Participants who overlap between frames during the survey were counted once. It appears that 28% of participants were youth. Out of a total of 1,529 interviewed respondents 1,265 come from households and 18% of them were household heads. The average size of households was 9 members (the number varies from a minimum of 2 to a maximum of 35 household members). [59 pages]. Read More...

Ghana Strengthening Social Accountability Mechanism (GSAM) final

USAID/Ghana contracted Social Impact, Inc. to conduct an impact evaluation of USAID’s Ghana Strengthening Accountability Mechanisms (GSAM) program, which aims to increase accountability of local District Assemblies in Ghana. This randomized-controlled trial, impact evaluation tests the effect of two distinct efforts to increase accountability and improve service delivery outcomes at the district level. One-hundred and fifty of Ghana’s districts were matched and randomized into one of three groups: a top-down treatment group that received performance audits conducted by the central government Ghana Audit Service (GAS); a bottom-up treatment group that received civil-society organization (CSO) led scorecard campaigns; and a control group that did not receive either intervention.
Through surveys with citizens, local administrators, and local politicians and through a review of administrative data, we find that both CSO and GAS programming generally reduce citizen satisfaction with projects and services, but this is largely driven by districts that receive negative audit reports. That citizens are correctly attributing bad audit performance to poor-performing DAs is encouraging from the point of view of accountability. This progress with citizens has not, however, translated into many substantial changes in how administrators or politicians manage projects or project budgets. Neither GAS nor CSO programming improve transparency or corruption. GAS programming does reduce the incidence of partisan manipulation of public resources by politicians, and it also increases the perception of partisan manipulation among administrators. This is consistent with GAS sensitizing administrators to partisan manipulation and reducing its actual incidence among DA politicians.
CSO programming increases citizen-reported consultation on recent development, and administrators in CSO districts spend, on average, three hours more responding to constituents. Reasons that the intervention did not have a stronger impact on district officials includes (1) natural limits to the number of citizens reached by the intervention, (2) limited district government capacity and frequent turnover, and (3) local government dependence on federal budget transfers. Read More...

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