End of Project evaluation

The Gendered Dimension of Multi-Purpose Cash Supporting Disaster Resilience (Arabic)

In 2017, in response to the mounting humanitarian crisis in Yemen, CARE Yemen and Action Contra la Faim (ACF) implemented a cash transfer program and community asset rehabilitation and skill building programing in the governorates of Abyan and Amran. This European Union (EU)-funded program integrated these interventions to enhance resilience building at household and community levels.
The overall objective of this study is to assess the impact of the Multi-Purpose Cash (MPC) on the resilience of households targeted by the program, with a focus on the experiences of female-headed households, their challenges with increasing their resilience, and barriers that male-headed households do not face. Read More...

Indashyikirwa programme to reduce intimate partner violence in Rwanda: Report of findings from a cluster randomized control trial

Intimate partner violence (IPV), which includes physical and sexual violence, economic abuse and emotional aggression within intimate relationships, is the most common form of violence against women globally. IPV can lead to a wide range of negative health consequences including depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, post-traumatic stress disorder, drug and alcohol abuse, serious injuries, and death. The Indashyikirwa programme in Rwanda sought to reduce experience of IPV among women and perpetration of IPV among men, and also to shift beliefs and social norms that sustain IPV in communities and couples. The programme also strove to support equitable, non-violent relationships, and ensure more supportive and empowering responses to survivors of IPV seeking assistance. The impact evaluation of Indashyikirwa assessed whether and how the programme met these objectives and sought to inform the global best practices in IPV prevention by generating evidence through a rigorous community randomized controlled trial (cRCT).

The quantitative impact evaluation of Indashykirwa took the form of a cRCT with randomization at sector level and two separate evaluation components: (1) a cohort of control and intervention couples interviewed at baseline, 12 months, and 24 months, and (2) a pair of cross-sectional community surveys with control and intervention communities implemented at the beginning of the programme and 24 months later. This quantitative impact evaluation was accompanied by in-depth process evaluation and qualitative research with beneficiaries and programme staff. Read More...

Endline evaluation of WASH project in West Mosul, Iraq

This is an endline evaluation for the "Improving Sanitation, Hygiene, Renovation of Sewage Systems" project, funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic.
This project addressed critical needs for sanitation services in West Mosul, as a direct contribution to enable the affected populations to return home. The project aimed to repair two vital sanitation resources/infrastructure in West Mosul and to support the municipal authorities to build their capacity to eventually recover their costs, once the situation allows. Finally, the project intended to mobilize local communities towards greater ownership for their local environment, to avoid the recurrence of such sanitation risks and maintain a cleaner, more habitable environment. In addition to mitigate a number of health risks related to poor sanitation in urban areas, CARE’s engagement aimed to promote social cohesion and community participation among vulnerable populations affected by the conflict.
The End-line project Evaluation is intended to assess the relevance, performance, management arrangements and success of the project. It looks at signs of potential impact of project activities on men,
women, girls and boys identified as vulnerable and the sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development. The Evaluation also identifies, and documents lessons learnt and makes recommendations that project staff and the stakeholders might use to improve the design and implementation of other related projects and programs. Read More...

Are there gendered impacts to multi-purpose cash transfers intended to build resilience?

STARTING IN 2017 CARE YEMEN, in partnership with Action Contre la Faim (ACF), implemented a European Union (EU) consortium-funded resilience program in Abyan and Amran governorates. The project used a “Cash Plus” approach, combining ten monthly multi-purpose cash (MPC) transfers with the rehabilitation of vital community assets and livelihoods skills support. The program focused on previously underserved areas to enhance food and nutrition security, promote livelihood recovery and resilience of vulnerable
households, and stimulate local markets. Both interventions were deliberately integrated to enhance resilience building at the household and community levels.
See full evaluation here: http://careevaluations.org/evaluation/the-gendered-dimension-of-multi-purpose-cash-supporting-disaster-resilience/ Read More...

The Gendered Dimension of Multi-Purpose Cash Supporting Disaster Resilience

In 2017, in response to the mounting humanitarian crisis in Yemen, CARE Yemen and Action Contra la Faim (ACF) implemented
a cash transfer program and community asset rehabilitation and skill building programing in the governorates of Abyan
and Amran. This European Union (EU)-funded program integrated these interventions to enhance resilience building at
household and community levels.
The overall objective of this study is to assess the impact of the Multi-Purpose Cash (MPC) on the resilience of households
targeted by the program, with a focus on the experiences of female-headed households, their challenges with increasing
their resilience, and barriers that male-headed households do not face. Read More...

Better Environment for Education Project Endline

Throughout the past two decades, Rwanda has made significant efforts to improve the coverage of education to ensure that all Rwandans have access to quality education through the completion of secondary school. Despite policies to increase access to basic education and increase enrolment rates, dropout remains a key issue, especially in secondary school where female students tend to have lower completion rates than male students.
To promote better educational, social, and economic outcomes for students, CARE Rwanda established the Better Environment for Education (BEE) Project. Operating in the Western Province of Rwanda, the BEE Project provided holistic support--including academic resources, financial literacy training, and sexual and reproductive health education, and leadership training--to students to address obstacles to secondary education. As the BEE project neared its conclusion in 2019, CARE Rwanda commissioned this endline evaluation to assess trends and changes over time in students’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to the intervention’s aims. Read More...

Siaya Maternal and Child Nutrition Nawiri Project

The Siaya Maternal and Child Nutrition Nawiri Project was a 36-months intervention on maternal and child nutrition. The project was executed in partnership with CARE (the coordinator), Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK) and the Kisumu Medical and Education Trust (KMET) in Siaya County with funding support from the European Commission (EC), the Austrian Development Agency (ADA) and CARE. The overall objective of the project was to contribute to improving maternal, infant and young child nutrition (MIYCN), including nutrition of women of reproductive age, in Siaya County.

The specific objectives of the end-term evaluation of the Nawiri Project were to: (1) assess against the project goal, objectives and expected results based on the indicators of the project log-frame; (2) assess the project objectives and proposed outcomes by measuring performance against each indicator under each result area and analyze key determinants that were positively or negatively critical for obtaining these results; (3) assess the efficiency of the process of achieving results. Under this objective, the evaluation would determine the contribution of the adopted gender equality Social Analysis and Action (SAA) Model and rights based approach project, community score card strategy for social accountability, advocacy strategies for political commitment, role of mother to mother support groups, male champion curriculum and training, role of MIYCN Trainer of Trainers (ToTs), impact of community outreaches, food demonstration sessions, public participation by CHVs during budget development process towards achieved results; (4) evaluate the efficiency of the organizational set‐up for the project (partnership arrangement) and systems used in the delivery of the project and to what extent these contributed to or inhibited the delivery of the project outcomes; (5) assess how gender aspects have been considered and included in the implementation (with specific focus on gender mainstreaming, setting of gender equality goals), inter alia, how women had participated or were represented meaningfully in decision-making and feedback; (6) assess the level of sustainability (financial, institutional and social) of the individual project components, and identify critical areas that may affect sustainability; and (7) provide recommendations on future project design including how to ensure effectiveness of log frames. Read More...

PROFIT Financial Graduation

The PROFIT Financial Graduation Sub-Component, funded by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the Government of Kenya (GOK), aimed to enable vulnerable women and youth to build sustainable livelihoods and reduce risk aversion on supply and demand sides of financial sustainability through a sequenced set of interventions, including an asset transfer, technical and life skills training, mentorship, consumption and savings support. The program targeted 1,000 women and youth in Kitui and 1,600 women in Samburu. Ultimately, the goal of the program is to place vulnerable households on an upward trajectory out of ultra-poverty.
Since January 2017, with technical assistance from BRAC USA, the PROFIT Financial Graduation program was implemented by The BOMA Project and CARE International Kenya in Samburu and Kitui, respectively. Expanding Opportunities conducted a quasi-experimental impact evaluation of the PROFIT Financial Graduation pilots by assessing changes in income, savings, food security, health, and confidence that can be reliably attributed to program activities. This report comprises the results of the endline impact evaluation. Read More...

Endline Assessment for Multi-Sectoral Assistance to South Sudanese Refugees and Ugandan Host Communities in Bidibidi, Palorinya and Rhino Camp

Mercy Corps and its consortium partners Save the Children (SCI), CARE, Oxfam, and DanChurchAid (DCA) implemented the 21-month “Multi Sectoral Assistance to South Sudanese Refugees and Host Communities in West Nile (Bidibidi, Palorinya and Rhino Camp Settlements)” from May 2017 to February 2019, funded by European Union Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid (ECHO). The project delivered life-saving and protection assistance to vulnerable South Sudanese refugees and host communities in Bidibidi (Yumbe), Palorinya (Moyo) and Rhino Camp (Arua) settlements through 1) General and child protection; 2) Water and sanitation infrastructure and hygiene promotion; 3) Livelihoods and cash-based interventions; and 4) Market development, financial services and enhanced coordination. Specifically, the project aimed to increase resilience of South Sudanese refugees and host communities while promoting peaceful coexistence between and among the target groups. Read More...

Tipping Point Final Evaluation Phase One Nepal

Phase 1 of CARE’s Tipping Point project addressed child marriage through a dynamic process of innovation, insight, and influence in two districts of Nepal in partnership with Siddhartha Samudayik Samaj (SSS) and Dalit Social Development Centre (DSDC). In its first phase, the project promoted girls’ rights and choices regarding marriage in 16 communities using complementary approaches with collectives of girls, boys, and parents, who regularly participated in meetings, and advocacy events to raise public awareness and promote gender-equitable social norms. The project also engaged allies and potential champions for girls’ rights, including government and civil society, to help drive social change and direct more resources towards girls’ empowerment in project communities.
At the conclusion of Phase 1, an external evaluation team visited project sites in Kapilvastu and Rupandehi to conduct qualitative data collection with girls, boys, parents, and community members. The evaluation team’s findings indicate that Tipping Point’s iterative and adaptive strategies have contributed to several changes in the lives of girls, the actions of parents and community members to support girls, and social norms that promote gender equity. Read More...

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