Syria

Final Report for the Final Evaluation of OFDA Response program

This report presents the final evaluation of the United States’ Agency for International Development (Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance ( Response Program implemented by CARE Turkey and its partners in Aleppo and Idleb governorates of Northwest Syria. The evaluation aimed to assess the program’s relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, impact, sustainability and coordination using the Organization for Economic Co operation and Development's Development Assistance Committee (OECD DAC) evaluation criteria and was carried out from July to October 2021.

“I am very satisfied with this assistance in terms of gravelling the road, providing the camp with water and upgrading the tents for the entire camp. All of those interventions were desperately needed. People are satisfied because the situation has improved within the camp.”
-Camp Manager
“I can say that this service is very important in all aspects because it is securing clean and safe water for the neighborhood (…). Everyone in the neighborhood is satisfied with the services.”
-FGD participant Read More...

Final evaluation of the FFP III program 2021

Jouri for Research and Consulting was commissioned by CARE International (CARE) to undertake a final evaluation of the Food for Peace project, “Emergency and Regular Food Assistance in Syria” implemented in Aleppo and Idleb in Northwest Syria (NWS), funded by USAID’s Food for Peace (FFP) program. The project is implemented through four local partner organizations as well as CARE’S area office in Jarablus.
The project consisted of cash distribution (both one-off as well as multi-round cash for food (MRCFF) support and livelihoods activities, which included wheat value chain support (wheat purchase from selected farmers, milling into flour, distribution to bakeries for subsidized bread and infrastructure rehabilitation) and cash for work (CFW) activities. The project was implemented through the local partners Shafak, Ihsan, Syria Relief (SR) and Insani Yardımlaşma Derneği (IYD), as well as CARE’s area office (AO) in Jarablus.
The evaluation addressed the key evaluation questions organized under the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development's Development Assistance Committee (OECD DAC )evaluation criteria, including Relevance, Efficiency, Effectiveness, Impact and Sustainability. The impacts of coordination among other actors and between partners was also investigated. In total, Jouri conducted 587 surveys, nine focus group discussions (FGDs) and 40 key informant interviews (KIIs). Data was collected face to face and in some cases, remotely due to COVID-19. The evaluation was conducted between July and September 2021. Data was collected in August and September 2021. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis North West Syria-Idleb

This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) provides information about the different needs, capacities and coping mechanisms of women, men, boys and girls living in Idleb Governorate. Idleb has long been a safe haven for hundreds of thousands of internally displaced people (IDP) since the early years of the Syrian conflict. The growing population of IDPs overstretched the already limited capacity of the governorate. Since 1 December 2019, almost one million people were forced to flee from their homes to escape from the violence and four out of five people who have been displaced are women, girls or boys.
1 Humanitarian workers in the field raised concerns over the effects of the current situation on women and children, due to displacement, crowded living conditions, the lack of privacy, exploitation, and other factors.
2 Women and girls are disproportionately affected by humanitarian crises due to the exacerbation of already existing gender inequalities and vulnerabilities. An inclusive, effective and successful humanitarian response should understand and address different needs, vulnerabilities, capacities and coping mechanisms of women, men, girls and boys.
For this purpose CARE conducted three Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) in 2014, 2018 and 2019 in North West Syria. The fieldwork of the last RGA was completed in August 2019 and the report was finalized in December 2019. However, as the situation deteriorated after heavy airstrikes and shelling targeted Idleb in mid-December, CARE decided to conduct a new RGA to better understand and respond to the evolving crisis. The objectives of this RGA are to inform program activities and procedures, including how to better target women and girls in ways that are safe, equitable, and empowering within the local context and develop a set of actionable recommendations for the different sectors based on key findings. The RGA used a CARE RGA3 methodology. It included a household survey of 396 participants: 186 women and 210 men. Read More...

EXAMINING WOMEN AND GIRLS’ SAFE SPACES (WGSS) IN HUMANITARIAN CONTEXTS: Research Findings from Northwest Syria and South Sudan

Gender-based violence (GBV) in humanitarian contexts represents a global issue of grave concern, disproportionately affecting women and girls. In light of its detrimental impact on the health, well-being and development of survivors, the international community has placed a strong priority on combatting and responding to GBV in all its forms.
Women and Girls’ Safe Spaces (WGSS) are among the most widely implemented GBV prevention and response programming interventions globally. In spite of their popularity and potential to increase the well-being, safety, and empowerment of women and girls, there is a lack of rigorous evidence regarding the role of these spaces in the lives of participants. Building an evidence base is particularly crucial in order to understand the impact and effectiveness of WGSS as an intervention and determine ways in which existing programming can be adapted to increase overall quality.
In response to the crucial need for evidence around WGSS programming globally, CARE USA conducted a study to examine the effectiveness of WGSS in the lives of women and girls in two conflict-affected settings, Northwest Syria and South Sudan. These locations are particularly relevant for this research as the selected study sites are home to a large number of internally displaced persons (IDPs), and are settings in which women and girls face a significant risk of experiencing GBV. These contexts are also ones in which CARE has existing WGSS interventions in place. Read More...

Promoting Economic Resilience of Syrian Women (PERSEVERE) Annual Project Results Report (April 2020 – March 2021)

“Promoting Economic Resilience of Syrian Women” (PERSEVERE, CAD$8,497,675) is undertaken with the financial support from the Government of Canada, provided through Global Affairs Canada. It aims to enhance the resilience of displaced and conflict-affected Syrian women, including women with disabilities. Led by CARE Canada and implemented by the Syria Resilience Consortium (SRC), CARE, and Humanity & Inclusion (HI), PERSEVERE is designed to contribute to this goal through the following Intermediate Outcomes:
1) Women, including young and older women as well as women with disabilities, participate more actively in community economic governance; and
2) Community members, institutions, and response actors actively support the inclusion of Gender, Age and Disability (GAD) consideration in economic governance. Initial project learning and methods are meant to be shared across the whole of Syria and other SRC members and introduced to wider response actors contributing to resilience.
This year, the program has been continuing to support inclusion of women and persons with disabilities in livelihood activities. More women have been provided with in-depth training to support other women to expand and grow their businesses. Read More...

‘IF WE DON’ T WORK, WE DON’ T EAT’ Syrian Women Face Mounting Food Insecurity a Decade into the Conflict

Ten years ago, the lives of many Syrians changed profoundly as anti-government demonstrations escalated into violent conflict between forces allied to the Government of Syria and armed opposition groups. The resulting humanitarian crisis is one of the worst of our time – 6.7 million Syrians remain internally displaced; an estimated 13 million people are in need1 and 12.4 million live with food insecurity.

In recent months, the situation has deteriorated even further as the COVID-19 pandemic, mass displacements, natural
disaster, economic collapse and ongoing hostilities have combined to create a situation wherein households are
finding it increasingly difficult to meet their basic needs, including for food.

Average food prices in Syria increased by 236% in 2020 – and food prices are more than 29 times higher than the five year pre-crisis average, causing many families to resort to negative coping strategies. This includes eating fewer
or smaller meals to get by. Furthermore, due to the loss or reduced capacity of male heads of household to death, injury, disappearance or emigration in search of work, many Syrian women are now the sole or primary breadwinners for their families, bearing the full burden of providing for their families with limited livelihood opportunities. About 22% of Syrian households are now headed by women; this is up from only 4% prior to the conflict. Even in households where the male head of household is working in some capacity, dire economic circumstances have pushed women to find some source of income to help with household expenses. In both cases, women are thrust into the ‘provider’ role in a way that most had not previously experienced. Read More...

Turkey Case Studies On Syrian Refugees

A collection of case studies about shelter, livelihoods, and protection with Syrian refugees as they tell their stories of getting through their crisis. Read More...

Final Evaluation Food for Peace II program in Syria

Jouri for Research and Consulting was commissioned by CARE International (CARE) to undertake a final evaluation of the project “Emergency and Regular Food Assistance in Syria” in Aleppo and Idleb, funded by USAID Food for Peace and implemented by four partner organizations over a period of 15 months. Project activities included multi-round and emergency cash assistance, in-kind assistance (RTE rations and ready to-eat rations) and wheat value chain support (wheat purchase from selected farmers participating in another of CARE’s livelihood project, milling into flour, distribution to bakeries for subsidized bread production, and infrastructure improvements). The evaluation was conducted in the period between August to mid-September 2020 to address the key evaluation questions posed by CARE, organized under the OECD DAC evaluation criteria: 1) Relevance, 2) Efficiency, 3) Effectiveness, 4) Impact, 5) Sustainability.
The purpose of the evaluation was to document evidence of change at outcome and impact levels to be used for organizational learning and improvements of future programming, and accountability towards donor, partners and ultimately beneficiaries. Read More...

Jarablus Needs Overview

Since January 2020, Syria's economic future is increasingly becoming uncertain. Regional actors and local commmunities, who were previously acting as an economic bridge to the outside world, are facing their own economic turmoil and leaving Syria isolated with unprecedent depreciation of the Syrian Pound. The interlinked nature of Syria’s politics, economy and infrastructure are now forcing citizens to choose between the uncertainty of a pandemic or reality of household deprivation at the confluence of the conflict, economic crisis and COVID-19 pandemic.

This infographic aims to present an overview of the needs in Jarablus through an internal analysis of data collected by
Humanitarian Needs Assessment Programme during the months of July and August 2020. Read More...

WASH in Camps Final KAP Survey in North East Syria

CARE North East conducted an Endline Survey in Areesha and Al Hole camps at Al Hassakeh and Abo Khashab camp in Deir-ez-Zor governorate. In order to achieve the following objective:
• Assess community ability to access the quality of water supply through rehabilitation of water supply networks and chlorination where necessary
• Assess community ability to access to functioning sanitation systems through rehabilitation of sanitation systems and landfills
• Assess community knowledge about maintaining household and community hygiene practices through hygiene promotion.
• Assess the local capacity to sustain these interventions through the development and training of WASH management committees (WMC). Read More...

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