Food Crisis

The Impact of the Food Crisis on Women and Girls in Afghanistan

CARE conducted a study on how the food crisis in Afghanistan affects women and girls differently to better understand the gendered economic, cultural, and practical barriers to food security. This research highlights key findings on household food security, negative coping strategies women and families adopt, and shortcomings of humanitarian actors in gender-responsive aid delivery. The study is based on a comprehensive desk review of existing data since August 2021, a household survey comprising of 345 women respondents, completed in both urban and rural communities, a series of qualitative interviews with 18 women, 9 focus group discussions (FGDs) with men, and key informant interviews (KIIs) with food security specialists and humanitarian actors. The data was collected in urban and rural districts in 9 provinces in the north, west, south, and center of the country. Read More...

Drought Assessment Report – CARE Morocco

This report will study the overall situation in Morocco and the drought’s negative effects on agriculture, the economy, food security, etc., with gender lenses considering how different gender groups are affected differently on household and community levels. Additionally, the report will provide suggestions and information for the way forward at the local level and per gender group.
Key findings:
• Male community members in the rural areas who used to consider agriculture as their main income source decided to migrate to urban communities seeking temporary or permanent jobs.
• Women are the most affected during the drought season for several reasons:
▪ Women are primarily responsible for fetching water and with the drought, access to water is more challenging.
▪ When the male HHs members migrate to urban areas, female members step forward to take additional responsibilities on top of their existing daily tasks which put them in very overwhelming circumstances.
It is observed that over the past few years, farmers have progressively stopped using local seeds/seedlings/crops aiming for a higher yield using foreign inputs that showed low resilience to Moroccan climate and weather. Similarly, few profitable crops were cultivated in areas that suffer from water scarcity such as watermelon, avocado, and few other crops which led the government to intervene and restrict these crops in certain locations.
• It was reported that veterinary service expenses, which were already high, have increased even more due to inputs and fuel costs which pushed herders to reduce the frequency of veterinary
checks.
• Drought can have a significant impact on the macro economy, but through this study, it was confirmed that the most affected sector was the agricultural production and yields, and thus people’s livelihoods such as small farmers and rural workers with specific challenges women and girls were going through due to water and income shortage.
• water consumption was reduced despite the implications on the amount of yield they will harvest later but considering that irrigation expenses won’t be recovered by selling their crops later considering the high production cost and limited purchasing power. Read More...

GENDER, PROTECTION AND AAP RISK ASSESSMENT 2022

Borno state in Northeast Nigeria is experiencing a complex humanitarian crisis due to the activities of Organized Armed Groups (OAG), and natural disasters (such as floods, and desertification), resulting in displacement, an increased level of food insecurity, and malnutrition among the populace, and deaths. Thousands of pastoralists and farmers are left without their livelihood sources resulting in extreme poverty. The recent COVID-19 pandemic has compounded the problems faced by locals due to several restrictions resulting in the disruption of many economic and social activities. More so, is the general inflation in the prices of commodities and services. Read More...

Rwanda: Gender equality helping farmers cope with increased food insecurity

The Indashyikirwa project was implemented in selected communities in seven districts of Rwanda from 2014-2018. It aimed to reduce the gender-based violence (GBV) experienced by women who were members of Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs). The project’s couples’ curriculum resulted in a 55% reduction in the odds of women experiencing physical and/or sexual violence from their partner when compared with women who only joined VSLAs. Read More...

CARE Guatemala Food Security Rapid Assessment 2022

EVALUACIÓN RÁPIDA DE INSEGURIDAD ALIMENTARIA SAN BARTOLOMÉ JOCOTENANGO, QUICHÉ

Rural families in Guatemala face one of the most severe food shortage seasons, mainly due to the high cost of meeting their basic needs, the effects of international conflicts and COVID-19 prevention measures, low hiring of temporary labor, the slow recovery of the impact of storms Eta and Iota, and the rainy season 2022 that has started with rains above normal, causing water saturation in the soil, which affects subsistence agriculture. This is worst for families who live in the dry corridor.

In this context, the Municipal Coordinator for the Disaster Reduction –COMRED- and the Municipal Directorate of Comprehensive Disaster Risk Management -IMGIRD of the municipality of San Bartolomé Jocotenango, department of Quiché, with the technical support of CARE Guatemala and TECHO, surveyed 163 households in 33 rural communities to know the availability and access to food, the economic situation, gender roles and strategies of survival that families are implementing. This report shares the results of the analysis of the data collected in July 2022

• 42% of households do not have any remaining grain from the previous harvest, and a further 33% only have remaining grain reserves for further 3 months or less.
• Women earn 56% less than men. On average, men earn $143 per month, and women earn $62.
• 21% have gone into debt to be able to buy food
• 38% are reducing the size of their meals; 22% of people are eating less (or have stopped eating) to make sure their children can eat
• 31% are now skipping at least one meal per day
• 3.7% have spent entire days without eating
• 2% have sold their land to buy food
• In 45% if the households, at least one member has migrated outside the community to find jobs elsewhere.
• Women and young girls are doing 94% of the work preparing food, cleaning, and taking care of family members. Read More...

The crisis we can still avert

By September of 2022, the global food crisis had gotten so extreme that 205.1 million people urgently need humanitarian food assistance just to survive. Tragically, if we do nothing, the crisis could grow by another 620.9 million people in the next 6 months. That is the crisis we can still avert. Investing in food production, increasing resilience, and functioning markets can stave off this crisis if we act fast.

A recent report from Gro Intelligence and CRU Group estimates that the impacts from the Ukraine crisis on nitrogen fertilizer availability in the global agriculture system will lead to a total loss of 72 trillion calories of food produced in 2022 alone. That loss would cause 620.9 million MORE people who are already struggling to meet their basic food needs to lose at least one more meal a day for the next 6 months. This is the crisis that is coming—growing the current crisis by more than three times higher the 205.1 million people already experiencing food crisis.

Gender inequality will play a significant role in this crisis. Based on current trends in gender equality and food security, 332.8 million of these people will be women. That means 44.7 million more women than men could miss one meal a day for the next 6 months. Women could miss 8.5 billion more meals than men.

This is not a foregone conclusion. We can still act to prevent the worst of the crisis. The number of calories lost is only part of the story. Food insecurity is as much as story of inequality as it is of food production. Read More...

FOOD SECURITY AND NUTRITION CRISIS IN SRI LANKA

Sri Lanka is struggling to pay import bills for food, fuel, gas, and other essential goods necessary for the daily life of its citizens, and prices keep increasing (the food inflation rate is ~94%). Read More...

Ghana: Bringing the inputs one step closer to the farmers

Worldwide, the Ukraine conflict is leading to unparallel price hikes in food, fuel, and fertilizer. Like most countries in the world, Ghana is being impacted by these shocks. In simple words, Ghana is already on the path to growing less food this year. Farmers are not producing enough food crops, which affects their households’ livelihoods, and impacts women and children. To understand more about the current impact of the global food crisis on smallholder farmers and their coping mechanisms in the local context, CARE engaged with farmers in Ghana. Read More...

Food Security and Gender Equality: A synergistic understudied symphony

As women keep feeding the world, we must give them the right space in our data collection methods and analysis to make the gaps they encounter visible and find solutions that include those. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore the correlation between gender inequality values and food security scores worldwide combined with existing literature and rich studies on the links between gender and food in specific contexts to create powerful insights on the need that the world needs to produce, publish, and use more consistent data on gender equality and food. Read More...

The impact of commodity price hikes on poor and extreme poor households – SHOUHARDO III

Between June and July month, the SHOUHARDOIII program conducted its annual Beneficiary Based Survey (BBS) and captured the impact of recent price hikes on the life of the program participants. The SHOUHARDOIII program reaches over 475,228 members of 168,535 poor and extremely poor households in Bangladesh. The findings of the annual survey confirm that households are experiencing an increase in the price of essential commodities over the last six months. Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all