Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Multi-sectoral life-saving project Sexual reproductive maternal health, WASH and protection services for the crisis affected population in Iraq Baseline

With funding support from the German Federal Foreign Office(GFFO), CARE implements a 21 months multisectoral live-saving project: sexual reproductive maternal health, WASH and protection services to crisis affected population in Iraq: Anbar governorate (Districts of Fallujah and Khalidiya), Ninewa governorate (West Mosul) and Duhok governorate (Mamrashan IDP camp) with 21,386 direct beneficiaries aiming at:1) Quality essential SRMH services will be provided in areas of origin (Fallujah, Khalidiya and West Mosul) through strengthened health facilities, enhanced awareness and mobilization of communities and reinforced referral mechanisms. 2) WASH needs of crisis affected IDPs in Mamrashan camp will be met through care and maintenance of WASH facilities, water quality tests, hygiene promotion, solid waste management and establishment of gender balanced WASH committees. 3) Protection response services including, psycho-social support (PSS), dignity kit support will be provided to vulnerable women, girls, men and boys in Fallujah, Khalidiya, West Mosul and Mamrashan IDP camp. [35 pages]. Read More...

WASH, PROTECTION AND SRHR SUPPORT TO IDPS AND RETURNEES IN IRAQ 2020-2021 Baseline

With funding support from the Global Affairs Canada (GAC), CARE implements a 24 months multi-sectoral livesaving project: WASH, Protection and SRMH support to IDPs and Returnees in Iraq 2020-2021 in Duhok governorate (Chamishko and Essyan IDP camps) and Ninewa governorate (Sinjar district) with 64,434 individuals (18,169 women, 14,701 girls, 16,924 men, 14,640 boys) direct beneficiaries aiming at WASH, Protection Intervention, and SMRH. The methodology for baseline survey is based on using mixed-method participatory approach as baseline team believes that participation improves quality and enhances ownership.
The CARE baseline survey data collection for the camps took place from May 21, 2020 to May 31, 2020, and in Sinjar district from September 1, 2020 to September 10, 2020. The purpose of the baseline study is to better understand the situation and current needs of the population in order to ensure more effective and responsive project implementation as well as improved living conditions for IDPs, returnees and host communities in the project areas [45 pages]. Read More...

Restoring Water Supply System and improved Sanitation and Hygiene Practices in West Mosul, Iraq – Phase III Baseline

With funding support from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Government of Czech Republic (MoFA Czech), CARE will implement a six - months project aimed at restoring water supply system and improved sanitation and hygiene practices in West Mosul, Iraq. The project will be implemented in West Mosul Zenjele and Ghazlani neighborhoods targeting IDPs, host communities and returnees with 47,500 direct beneficiaries.
The baseline assessment targeted areas identified as high priority by Directorate of water that are in need of rehabilitation and replacement of non-functional parts of water infrastructure. Local authorities are currently overwhelmed by the scale of needs and require support from donors and humanitarian agencies, as a direct contribution to enabling affected populations to have durable solutions through sustainable restoration of services such as water and sanitation. The project will directly support repair of two vital water infrastructure at Ghazlani water treatment plant and Yarmouk booster pumping station in the area of West Mosul while supporting the Municipal Authorities by building their capacity to eventually recover their costs.

The purpose of the Baseline Survey was to obtain a better understanding of the current situation in relation to water supply, sanitation and hygiene amongst the population in the target areas, and establish baseline benchmarks on key project indicators, which will enable the level of success of the project to be measured at the project end. The results of the baseline survey will later be used to evaluate the extent to which the project has met the desired impact post project implementation compared against project endline results.
The baseline assessment assesses:
• Access to safe water and sanitation situation pre-implementation.
• Challenge of solid waste management systems and existence practices.
• Hygiene education sessions on household level
• knowledge, perception, attitude and practice in relation to hygiene, water and sanitation.
[24 pages] Read More...

Action for Supporting Host Community Adaptation & Resilience ASHAR Alo Yearly Review 2020

As a multi-year project, mid-term review/year-end assessment has been commissioned to assess relevancy of design, approach and methodology, implementation strategy, efficiency and effectiveness of actions, effects of actions on community people etc. This is an internal assessment to improve the project. The ASHAR Alo project targets host communities located outside of the refugee camps, consolidating programmatic gains through OFDA funding for sustainable development in the area. The project activities are focused on Jaliyapalong, and Palongkhali. CARE aims to strengthen host communities' resilience, by enhancing community-based disaster risk reduction (DRR), upgrading infrastructure and providing livelihoods opportunities, across shelter, settlement and WASH sectors. The project will also respond to the urgent protection and gender-based violence needs in the host community. Activities are being undertaken in collaboration with government and community stakeholders, as well as UN and NGO actors.

The assessment was conducted in September 2020 applying both quantitative and qualitative tools and approaches. The samples were drawn purposively. Considering the COVID-19 situation, the short sample size was determined following most common statistical formulae. Throughout the study, it follows USAID compliance and directives. It covers a total of 228 respondent’s households from 4 WARDs under Jaliyapalong Union in Ukhiya Upazailla, Cox’s Bazar district. Quantitative Data collection has been conducted with Tablets using KoBo. [41 pages].
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Productive Water Technologies to enhance resilience for smallholder farming households in Chiredzi and Mberengwa Baseline Report

CARE International in Zimbabwe is implementing the Productive Water Technologies to enhance Resilience for Smallholder Farming Households initiative, within two existing CARE resilience building projects. The LDSC-funded intervention will complement the software components of two ongoing CARE projects funded by the Zimbabwe Resilience Building Fund (ZRBF), which is managed by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). The two CARE projects, Enhancing Community Resilience and Sustainability (ECRAS) running from July 2016 to March 2021, and Enhancing Community Resilience and Inclusive Market Systems (ECRIMS) running from September 2017 to October 2020, are being implemented in Chiredzi (and Mwenezi) and Mberengwa (and Zvishavane) districts respectively.
The current projects mainly focus on software (training, capacity-building, etc.), with limited establishment of water infrastructure. Specifically, the new initiative will support year-round access to productive water for smallholder farming households in Chiredzi and Mberengwa districts through the establishment/construction and rehabilitation of water infrastructure and related production assets. Year-round water access will address challenges relating to livestock and crop production, thus helping improve food and nutrition security for smallholder farming households, including those headed by women and youth. Some of the water points also will provide safe drinking water. In each of the two districts (Mberengwa and Chiredzi), the proposed project interventions will be layered on and integrated with the two ongoing CARE projects to enhance resilience and sustainability. Both ECRAS and ECRIMS aim to increase community capacities to sustain development gains and achieve improved well-being in the face of shocks and stresses. The projects, which enhance household and community resilience, seek to achieve five outcomes: Household and community capacities and assets are strengthened to deal with economic and climate-related shocks and stresses [54 pages]. Read More...

Durable Solutions for Returnees and IDPs in Somalia (DSRIS) Project Final Report

The Durable Solutions for Refugees and IDPs in Somalia (DSRIS) was a three-year that was implemented in Somalia between 10 January 2017 to 9 January 2020 under the consortium of CARE International (Lead agency), Save the Children (SCI), Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development (ACTED), IMPACT Initiatives and Save Somali Women and Children (SSWC). The project was funded by the European Union (EU). The aim of the project was to contribute to the integration of internally displaced persons, returnees and refugees in Somalia by improving access to basic quality services such as education, health, hygiene and sanitation, Child Protection and Gender-Based Violence (GBV) intervention. Additionally, the project aimed at enhancing relevant and sustainable livelihood opportunities for youth at risk of illegal migrations, radicalization, as well as other vulnerable displaced people, returnees and host communities to enhance integration and social cohesion. The project was being implemented in Puntland, Bari, and Mudug (Bossaso and Galkacyo north districts), Galmudug, Mudug, and Galgaduud (Dhusamareb, Adaado, and Galkacyo south). The sectors targeted by the project include Education, Health, WASH, Child Protection/GBV, women and youth empowerment and integration. Read More...

Projet Nutrition at Center (N@C)

CARE implemented an innovative, comprehensive five-year approach (2013-2017) with the goal of reducing anemia in women of childbearing age, and anemia and stunting in children under two years old. The approach integrated i) maternal and child health (MCH), infant and young child feeding (IYCF); ii) Water, hygiene and sanitation (WASH); and iii) food security (FS) and women's empowerment. Conducted in four (04) developing countries (Bangladesh, Benin, Ethiopia and Zambia), nutrition at the Center (N@C) aims to develop, document and disseminate the effectiveness and efficiency of an integrated approach that will improve sustainable nutritional status of mothers and children. Read More...

SWEEP-Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection Project in East and West Belesa Woredas of Central Gondar Zone, Amhara Regional State

Introduction and Context of the Evaluation
This report refers to the midterm evaluation (MTE) of “SWEEP-Water for Food Security, Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Protection Project” funded by Austrian Development Cooperation through Austrian Development Agency (ADA) and implemented by CARE Ethiopia. The project was commenced in October 2017 and will be implemented through September 2020 in East and West Belesa Woredas of Central Gondar Zone, Amhara National Regional State. With the ultimate impact of “Chronically food insecure households in Belesa Woredas have improved food security and resiliency”, the project was designed and implemented to achieve the following outcomes.
i. Improved access to water resources for domestic consumption and productive use and enhanced and sustainable productivity of land for varied uses
ii. Vulnerable groups empowered to contribute productively in the household and community
iii. Local government capacitated and community empowered to initiate and lead community development and adaptive measures
The purpose of this mid-term evaluation was assessing the degree of success based on the five OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) standard evaluation parameters. Ten selected project intervention Kebeles from the two intervention Woredas were visited in this evaluation process. Participatory and multi-stage evaluation methods, data sources and triangulations were made to analyze the project status and measure the performance. Quantitative and qualitative data collection methods were used to collect data from direct project beneficiaries such as chronically food insecure and drought affected people, rural women and girls, persons with disabilities, youth, relevant government sector and administrative offices at various levels and CARE. Overall, household survey was administered on 845 HHs and 14 KII, 21 FGDs, 20 direct observations and 16 in-depth interviews were made. The following description illustrates the summary of key midterm evaluation findings. Read More...

NUTRITION AND HYGIENE: END OF PROJECT REPORT (2013‐2019)

In alignment with USAID’s resilience strategy to mitigate recurrent shocks on vulnerable populations in Mali, the overall goal of the Integrated Rural Program to Improve Nutrition and Hygiene – USAID Nutrition and Hygiene – project (2013‐2019) was to improve the nutritional status of women and children, with a special emphasis on building resilience through the prevention and treatment of undernutrition.
The project – which was implemented by a CARE‐led consortium that included Family Health International (FHI 360), the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and a Malian non‐governmental organization (NGO) called Yam‐Giribolo‐Tumo (YA‐G‐TU) – targeted three regions in Mali: Mopti, Ségou and Koulikoro. These regions are all characterized by drought and climate‐related chronic food insecurity and high acute malnutrition rates. The project was implemented in nine districts across these three regions: Nara (Koulikoro Region), Niono (Ségou Region), Mopti, Bandiagara, Bankass, Tenenkou, Youwarou, Koro and Djenne (Mopti Region). In 2016, the
project received additional funding from Feed the Future to reinforce its agriculture component in the Mopti region.
The project aimed to reach children during the 1,000‐day “window of opportunity” period between conception and the first two years of life through the promotion of community and health sector services, improved agricultural practices, nutrition education and social behavior change communication. Our approach addressed both the immediate causes of malnutrition – such as inadequate dietary intake and infectious diseases, including diarrheal diseases – and the underlying root causes of malnutrition – such as poor hygiene, inadequate sanitation infrastructure and barriers to the access to and consumption of quality, diverse foods. Read More...

USAID HAMZARI PROJECT Review of Youth Needs and Labor Market Assessment

This paper is a homebased, desktop review completed in the U.S. over 20 workdays of the Niger – Youth Needs and Labor Market Assessment draft report dated October 2019. This assessment was mainly based on the analysis of data collected in the field in the August 2019 period within three rural communes (Chadakori, Guidan Roumdji and Guidan Sori) targeted by the Hamzari Project in Niger’s Maradi Region.1 As it is possible that all the data collected is not reflected in this draft report, the author of this review attempts to complement this prior initial draft report with his own in-depth knowledge of Niger. Read More...

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