India

Kutch Livelihood and Education Advancement Project (KLEAP) Endline Report

This endline study was an attempt for measuring the extent to which the stated goals and objectives of the K-LEAP had met and contributed towards increasing the income of the families, thereby resulting in improving the quality of the life. As highlighted across various sections of the report, it was observed that involvement in K-LEAP positively impacted the life of participants and also increased their household income. Various initiatives undertaken as a part of K-LEAP are sustainable and have the potential to be replicated in future. [65 pages] Read More...

Enhancing Mobile Populations Access to HIV and AIDS Services Information and Support (EMPHASIS) Baseline

There are a growing number of people migrating between Bangladesh, Nepal and India. Mobility has long been linked with heightened vulnerability to HIV & AIDS. While overall HIV prevalence is low in Bangladesh and Nepal, there is a growing concern that vulnerable mobile populations are forming a bridge between high prevalence areas of India and low prevalence areas in Bangladesh and Nepal. Enhancing Mobile Populations’ Access to HIV & AIDS Services Information and Support (EMPHASIS) is a regional program being implemented by CARE Bangladesh, CARE India and CARE Nepal and led by CARE International UK (CIUK) to reduce AIDS related vulnerabilities among mobile populations crossing the borders of Bangladesh and Nepal into India. This 5-year (August 2009 – July 2014) program, is funded by the Big Lottery Fund (BIG) of United Kingdom. [57 pages] Read More...

Start Early: Read in Time (SERT) Endline Report

Start Early: Read in Time is a CARE India Solution for Sustainable Development (CISSD) initiative in select districts of Uttar Pradesh and Odisha with an overall goal of improving “early grade reading skills of children (6-9 years of age), especially girls from marginalized Dalit and Adivasi communities in the formal primary schools in Odisha and Uttar Pradesh.”

In order to reach this goal of improving early grade reading in government schools, the project has been implementing innovate techniques in three districts in UP and one in Odisha since 2014. The project extended to two more districts in UP in 2016 and another district in Odisha in 2017. This report presents the findings of the endline study conducted in the initial four districts under the program, namely- Bahraich, Balrampur and Shravasti in UP and Mayurbhanj in Odisha. [86 pages]
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New Born Survival Project (NBS) Endline Report

Care India carried out in the Newborn Survival project in Ajaygarh block in Panna district of Madhya Pradesh. The project focused on strengthening services in maternal and child health by training of frontline health workers, GNMs/ANMs and creating community awareness on health parameters to be taken care of during pregnancy and delivery. A baseline survey was conducted in the beginning of the project to record the then status of health services being provided and community knowledge and perception on the same. This report presents the end line survey findings after the completion of the project. [92 pages] Read More...

Urban Health Initiative (UHI) Endline Report

The benefits of family planning go beyond the prevention of maternal and child mortality and extend to poverty alleviation, environmental sustainability and the empowerment of women. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is committed to reducing unintended pregnancy in the developing world by increasing access to high-quality, voluntary family planning services. The Urban Reproductive Health (RH) Initiative, initiated in 2009, is one component of the foundation’s strategy that targets the expansion of quality family planning services in selected urban areas of Uttar Pradesh, India; Kenya; Nigeria; and Senegal. To build scientific evidence for urban family planning efforts, the Measurement, Learning & Evaluation (MLE) Project, led by the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH), in partnership with the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW), conducted an impact evaluation of the country-specific Urban Health Initiative (UHI) program in Uttar Pradesh, India. [102 pages] Read More...

‘We Pledge to Improve the Health of Our Entire Community’

Motivation is critical to health worker performance and work quality. In Bihar, India, frontline health workers provide essential health services for the state’s poorest citizens. Yet, there is a shortfall of motivated and skilled providers and a lack of coordination between two cadres of frontline health workers and their supervisors. CARE India developed an approach aimed at improving health workers’ performance by shifting work culture and strengthening teamwork and motivation. The intervention—“Team-Based Goals and Incentives”—supported health workers to work as teams towards collective goals and rewarded success with public recognition and non-financial incentives. [19 pages] Read More...

Pathways- Global Baseline Report

CARE’s Pathways program focuses on improving poor women farmers’ productivity by empowering them to more fully engage in equitable agriculture systems. The program is funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and implemented in Bangladesh, Ghana, India, Malawi, Mali, and Tanzania. Aligned with other CARE initiatives, such as CARE Australia’s WE-RISE program, Pathways is designed to overcome the constraints to women’s productive and equitable engagement in agriculture. Utilizing a strong gender focus, the program’s Theory of Change posits that marginalized, poor women farmers will be more productive, and their families more food secure when:
 women have increased capacity (skills, knowledge, resources), capabilities (confidence, bargaining power, collective voice), and support
 local governance and institutions have/implement gender-sensitive policies and programming that are responsive to the rights and needs of poor women farmers
 agricultural service, value chain, and market environments of relevance to women are more competitive, gender-inclusive, and environmentally sustainable. [104 pages] Read More...

mHealth Experiences: from Rigorous Research to Transformative Scale

This report outlines the background, data, and results of a mobile health program for continuum of care services. [28 slides] Read More...

Bihar Story 2017: PowerPoint Presentation

This presentation contains data collected from a household survey regarding socio-demographic profile, maternal & newborn health, nutrition, and immunizations. [114 slides] Read More...

Evaluation of the Team-Based Goals and Performance Based Incentives (TBGI) Intervention in Bihar

The Team-Based Goals and Performance-Based Incentives (TBGI) intervention, which CARE conceptualized, developed, and implemented as part of the Ananya program in Bihar, leverages the power of incentives and lessons from motivational theory on teamwork and goal-setting to help improve maternal and child health. Under the intervention, CARE set targets for the percentage of eligible beneficiaries in a subcenter catchment area who should have adopted each of seven key health behaviors or goals (Box 1). All frontline health workers (FLWs) in a given subcenter, including the accredited social health activists (ASHAs), Anganwadi workers (AWWs), and the subcenters’ auxiliary nurse midwives (ANMs), received nonmonetary incentives (consisting of small household items) if their subcenters met five of seven goals in a given quarter. The intervention explicitly sought to encourage teamwork and cooperation among FLWs by providing these incentives for achievements by the subcenter as a whole rather than by individual FLWs, and by providing FLWs with information on the concept and importance of teamwork. It included additional elements to motivate the FLWs in each subcenter, such as a service pledge they recited together and a certificate of recognition for subcenters that met their targets in all quarters. Overall, the intervention was expected to lead to improvements in the incentivized outcomes and to broader changes in related, but nonincentivized, outcomes through increased FLW motivation and teamwork. [82 pages]
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