Here in CARE International’s Evaluation e-Library we make all of CARE’s external evaluation reports available for public access in accordance with our Accountability Policy.

With these accumulated project evaluations CARE International hopes to share our collective knowledge not only internally but with a wider audience.

Looking for something specific? You can filter the evaluations using the dropdown menus on the right side of the screen.

If you have an evaluation or study to share, please e-mail the document to ejanoch@care.org for posting.

Mastercard Impact Fund and CARE Global Partnership: Ignite Program Endline Results Report

From December 2019 through May 2023, the Ignite project, supported by the Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth, was implemented by CARE in Vietnam, Pakistan and Peru where there are large segments of unserved micro and small enterprises ready for investment. The project was intended to increase financial security and resilience and grow the businesses of underserved micro-entrepreneurs, specifically those MSEs with between 2-10 employees, who have been in business for 2+ years. To achieve the above goal, the Ignite program envisioned a series of interventions to achieve intermediate outcomes, including improved ability to intentionally serve this segment from FSPs, business growth, financial sustainability, financial product performance, job creation and retention, financial resilience and enhanced digital literacy.
Impact level indicators include increase in household income and financial resilience. Both of the impact indicators have shown positive movements illustrating that the project has created a positive change. There are different degrees of change in different countries.
Percentage of strivers who reported an increase in household income showed impact across all three countries.
• Vietnam almost doubled the total number of households who increased income between baseline and endline (44% at baseline; 87% at endline), an increase of 43 percentage points.
• In Pakistan the number went up by 16 times (3% at baseline; 51% at endline).
• In Peru a total of 33% of the households reported an increase in their household income at the end of the project.
Percentage of strivers’ financial resilience also showed improvement.
• Vietnam recorded 43 percentage points improvement between baseline and endline (67% at baseline; 96% at endline).
• Peru showed 26 percentage points growth between baseline and endline (42% at baseline; 53% at endline).
•No comparable data for this indicator was found from Pakistan. Read More...

Systems-Level Change in Niger: Women and Girls Are Better Off Today Than in 1991

Few development programs have a decades-long lifespan and impact. CARE’s Mata Masu Dubara model (MMD) has been rolled out since 1991, championing women's leadership and economic empowerment in Niger. Originally conceived as savings and credit groups, the model has evolved over the years to address women’s groups demands to have better access to public health services, improve nutrition, receive technical training and participate in civic and electoral processes, among others.

In 2023, CARE initiated a ground-breaking systems evaluation of MMD groups in Niger to explore the actual influence the groups have on women’s and girl’s voice, leadership, economic autonomy and climate justice, published in a May 2023 report. A complementary mixed-methods evaluation conducted from July to December 2023 explores the influence of MMD on women and girls’ maternal health, early and forced marriage, education and nutrition, in partnership with the Government of Niger.

Using CARE’s pathways of systems-level change, combined with qualitative and quantitative data, the study explored four dimensions of change for each one of the topics mentioned above: 1. Advocacy to influence policies and programs; 2. Changes in social norms; 3. Supporting social movements; 4. Strengthening systems and social responsibility. Today, CARE Niger serves 33,795 groups with 865,000 women and girl members. In Maradi, Zinder, Dosso and Tahoua 1,378 women and men answered a survey; 314 women and men participated in focus group discussions and individual interviews.

Are women and girls of Niger better off in 2023 than they were in 1991? Yes. While the review noted progress made towards more gender equity for girls’ education, access and use of sexual and reproductive health services and more attention paid to the welfare of pregnant and breastfeeding women, early and forced marriage still persists. Leveraging the power of MMD groups and other trusted community leaders (teachers, principals, MMD female leaders, religious leaders) to design interventions to curb early marriage would yield tremendous benefits. Indeed, early marriage robs girls of 9% of their future income.

Through MMD, women of Niger have found their voice, been elected to parliament in record numbers (over 30% in 2021), and participate in local decision making processes as town councilors and local representatives. Acting both at the program, local level and the national, influencing one, CARE, its partners and networks of MMD groups will continue to create a better, safer, more prosperous environment for Nigerien girls. (86 pages) Read More...

Pledge for Change Reporting 2024

Overall, CARE has made significant progress on Pledge 3, some good progress on Pledge 2 (though not all of this can be measured yet), and some progress on Pledge 1.
In relation to equitable partnerships, we have set interim targets for 2025 for the extent and diversity of partnerships, and seen some progress in these areas, but our 2023 Keystone partner survey highlights three main areas for improvement: funding adequacy and timing, promotion of partners in the media, and joint decision-making. CARE is working on connecting finance and program reporting systems to better report on financial transfers to local partners (and to set a meaningful target for this for future years). We are also analysing good practices from positive outlier countries in the partner survey, to identify specific actions and processes that can be spread more widely to improve partnership practices.
For authentic storytelling, we have been shifting behaviours and practices towards anti-racist and decolonized communications, based on our global Communications Commitments. We are setting up a working group to explore global media monitoring and automate some monitoring requirements. CARE will also launch our third biannual image audit and update our images and consent policy. We can demonstrate some progress in acknowledging partners and promoting local voices in annual reports and information/advocacy campaigns, but we are not yet able to measure this in relation to fundraising.
In terms of influencing wider change, we have consistently been ceding space to local and national women-led organizations (WLOs) to advocate for their priorities with policy makers. We have also seized advocacy opportunities at the multilateral level and in the US to enhance donor transparency and accountability. CARE will lead negotiations to develop an IASC-endorsed definition of Women and Girl-Led Organizations to boost the engagement, participation and decision-making by these organisations in humanitarian action. We will continue to leverage our positions of influence in various policy platforms to open up leadership spaces for WLOs, and support them in using these spaces. CARE will set up mechanisms to track how our media and communications team is creating opportunities for partners, especially WLOs, to feature their voices and policy priorities. Read More...

Youth Skills Development Impact Brief

Globally, an estimated 282 million young people (aged 15-24) are not employed, in education, or in training (defined as NEET),1 and young people are three times as likely as adults to be unemployed.2 Nearly 75% of the world’s 1.8 billion young people lack the skills needed for the labor market.3 Strong economies hinge upon youth having the skills to secure meaningful, well-paid work. CARE’s programs help young people succeed in jobs, entrepreneurship, and ongoing career learning. CARE provides comprehensive strategies that support and collaborate with national governments, employers, educators, parents, and youth to develop the workforce for today and tomorrow. We build our programs to connect
young people with mentors, training providers, and employers. We train youth in soft skills (such as critical thinking, time management, decision making, self-confidence, and others), financial literacy, and market-demanded technical vocational skills to meet the needs of the labor market.

CARE’s youth skills & workforce development programs primarily support Sustainable Development Goal 8 - Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth. Since 2020, CARE’s programs have supported 22 million people in increasing their economic empowerment and participation in dignified work in 67 countries. Read More...

KEYSTONE PARTNER SURVEY 2023 CARE International

In 2023, CARE expressed its interest in conducting a Keystone Partnership Survey to understand how 304 local partners assessed their experience of working with CARE in an international development partnership. This report provides credible perceptual data from a partner perspective on how well CARE performs its role in the partnership.
Keystone’s partnership survey enables INGOs to benchmark their performance ratings against the experiences and perceptions of over 8,000 local partners of more than 90 INGOs (listed below in Table 1) that have taken the
survey.
Thematically, the survey explores the most important operational dimensions to international development partnerships – learning, monitoring & reporting, communications, financial support, and non-financial support.
CARE’s technical competence is further assessed through a series of questions about its sector-specific knowledge, leadership reputation, and value adding abilities. Overall relationship dynamics are captured through questions
about how well CARE learns and adapts, how CARE compares to other international partners, and the extent to which the local partner would recommend working with the CARE.
The report presents overall results for each survey question in a single graphic chart. For rating questions, Keystone employs Net Promoter Analysis (see Annex 6), allowing it to compare and benchmark CARE’s current responses against a benchmark drawn from Keystone’s global cohort of social change organizations.
Respondents indicated their region of work, budget size, type of organization, the type of work they do, and whether they were women-led. This enables us to analyse the data by these respondent characteristics without compromising anonymity. Where organizations of a particular characteristic (e.g., location or size of budget) vary from the average, we do not present it in a separate chart, but highlight these variations in the text accompanying
the charts. Read More...

SANAD – Women Participation in Community Health Development

This 37 page report highlights the results of the SANAD project funded by the European Union Read More...

RECOVERY, REINTEGRATION & RESILIENCE (R3) CONSORTIUM AFGHANISTAN

The R3 consortium in Afghanistan was born in October 2020 and designed to run until March 2024. Its objective was to address the needs of the population in a context of significant displacement and chronic fragility, bridging the gap between short-term humanitarian response in the early months of displacement, and longer-term sustainability and development. The three dimensions of resilience are thus deliberately included in the title of the Consortium itself: Recovery (absorptive); Resilience (adaptive) and Reintegration (transformative). R3 programming was implemented by a consortium of NGOs led by the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) with the participation of Action Against Hunger (AAH), CARE, and World Vision International (WV). Across eight provinces in western and southern Afghanistan, programming spanned a range of sectors in line with the consortium’s planned holistic approach: Water, Sanitation & health (WASH), Healthcare, Food Security & Livelihoods (FSL); Shelter, Legal Assistance, Psychosocial Support, Gender-Based Violence (GBV). Read More...

Call to Action Field Implementation (CAFI) II

CAFI seeks to catalyze the Call to Action on Protection from Gender-Based Violence in Emergencies (CTA) on the ground. The project works with women-led organizations (WLOs) to drive change and foster Gender-Based Violence (GBV) prevention, risk mitigation, and response in humanitarian emergencies.

In 2013, governments, donors, and humanitarian organizations launched the CTA, to fundamentally transform how GBV prevention, risk mitigation, and response are addressed. The CTA aims to strengthen accountability in policies, systems, and mechanisms.
The partnership has grown to more than 100 members, but consolidating CTA implementation in the field is a key gap that needs to be addressed. As a result, CAFI was launched to advance the Call to Action 2021- 2025 Road Map on the ground.
What are the main objectives of CAFI?
● Catalyze increased representation and leadership of women and girls, specifically WLOs, in decision making structures and humanitarian assistance
● Amplify GBV expertise: scaling existing capacity of WLOs
● Address GBV root causes and coordinate effective response and risk mitigation
How does CAFI work?
CAFI aims at contributing to WLO strengthening through capacity-sharing approaches between partners. WLOs are engaged from the beginning, allowing them to co-create and adapt the project according to their needs and contexts and ensuring
accountability and women’s voice and leadership throughout the whole project cycle.

CAFI works through a consortium of 10 WLOs across Latin America and the Caribbean, West and Central Africa, the Middle East/North Africa, and Europe, who coordinate national networks of WLOs: Arab Women Organization (AWO) of Jordan, Baghdad Women Association (BWA) in Iraq, Center Women’s Perspectives (CWP) in Ukraine, Comité des Jeunes Filles Leaders (COJEFIL) in Niger, Dynamique des Femmes Juristes (DFJ) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Fundación
para el Desarrollo en Género y Familia (GENFAMI) in Colombia, Global Media Campaign (GMC) in Mali, Himaya Daeem Aataa (HDA) in Lebanon, and Tinta Violeta in Venezuela. In Iraq, Lebanon, and Venezuela, project activities are co-led by WEO, Sama for Development, and Uniandes, respectively. Read More...

Promoting opportunities for women’s economic empowerment in rural africa

This 154 page mid-term evaluation highlights the findings of the external mid-term review of the Mas... Read More...

mHealth Experiences: from Rigorous Research to Transformative Scale

This report outlines the background, data, and results of a mobile health program for continuum of care services. [28 slides] Read More...

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