Here in CARE International’s Evaluation e-Library we make all of CARE’s external evaluation reports available for public access in accordance with our Accountability Policy.

With these accumulated project evaluations CARE International hopes to share our collective knowledge not only internally but with a wider audience.

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If you have an evaluation or study to share, please e-mail the document to ejanoch@care.org for posting.

Breaking the Cycle: Food Insecurity, Protection and Armed Conflict in Colombia

Conflict. Hunger. Protection risks. In Colombia, these three phenomena have been interconnected in a reinforcing cycle for decades. Efforts to address each component of this negative cycle are vital, but approaches are often disconnected, leading to short-term or incomplete solutions. As a result, communities struggle against growing odds to build resilience or stability.

Using participatory methods, a research team led by CARE, the World Food Programme (WFP), and InterAction interviewed 16 focus groups in 2 departments of Colombia to learn directly from diverse perspectives what threats, vulnerabilities, capacities, and risksi affected people faced. Though the negative cycle effect was widespread, differences between and within communities meant that often people experienced armed conflict, hunger, and protection risks in vastly different ways, indicating that one-size-fits-all solutions won’t be enough to bring lasting positive change.

Despite the differences in personal and communal experience of risk, two categories of variables emerged that defined how individuals were affected by conflict, hunger, and protection risks: context-specific conflict dynamics and institutionalized discrimination. Read More...

SELAM 1 Early Recovery and Socio-Economic Stability in Tigray: FPI MONITORING REPORT

In June 2023, Altai Consulting, the Third-Party Monitor (TPM) for the EU FPI, was tasked by the Nairobi Regional Team (RT) to research and
communicate the progress and impact on the ground of the project NDICI CRISIS FPI/2021/427-921 – “SELAM 1 Early Recovery and Socio-Economic Stability in Tigray”, implemented by CARE and REST.

The project is implemented in Tigray as part of a cluster of projects alongside CST and MdM projects also montiroed by Altai during this visit. These interventions focus on responding to Tigray’s post-war challenges, mostly related to livelihoods support, access to health services, and trauma healing.

The monitoring team looked to capture progress towards the project’s intended objectives at the mid-stage of its implementation. During an earlier monitoring conducted in December 2022, the Altai team found that progress had stalled due to security challenges on the ground but that the projects were gaining momentum due to the peace agreement signed in November 2022. Read More...

Harmony in Crisis: Unveiling Lessons of the Humanitarian Partnership Platform in Philippine Disaster Management

CARE launched the Philippines Humanitarian Partnership Platform (HPP) in 2016, which serves as an avenue to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of CARE and its partners’ humanitarian and development plans and work. This initiative focuses on strengthening coordination, decision- making, and collective action. Comprising 14 active member organizations including CARE and with a presence in all regions of the Philippines, the HPP has adeptly assessed and responded to 32 disasters since its inception. In FY 2022, coinciding with the devastation caused by Super Typhoon Rai—the second costliest typhoon in Philippine history after Typhoon Haiyan—the HPP supported 2,201,920 participants, both directly and indirectly. In FY 2023, it supported nearly 400,000 people in crises. Fifty percent of those directly assisted in the last 2 years are women and girls.

IN A NUTSHELL: STRONGER PERFORMANCE
1. Rapid responses with flexible funding: 76% of humanitarian funding in the Philippines goes to local partners, compared to the wider sector's average of around 1.2% in 2022.
2. Gender at the center: 88% of responses mainstreamed GBV protection, surpassing the 67% in CARE’s global project portfolio.
3. Better coordination, broader reach: By coordinating across diverse actors, including corporations and local governments, local organizations can help more people faster.
4. Enhanced Learning and Accountability: All projects (100%) feature Feedback and Accountability Mechanisms, exceeding the 79% in CARE’s global project portfolio. These mechanisms are vital for rapid learning and ensuring accountability to the communities served.
5. All projects met or exceeded reach and impact targets, based on a rapid analysis of available project reports. Read More...

Takunda Resilience Food Security Activity (RFSA) Outcome Mapping Baseline report

The main objective of Progress Marker Monitoring/Outcome Mapping is to assess, the extent to which gender transformative changes are taking place in Takunda Program areas among men, women, and youth based on age, life stage, socio-cultural norms, and religious practices. Takunda acknowledges that gender inequality is both a cause and consequence of food insecurity; hence gender equality is at the heart of the Takunda Program. To challenge gender norms that fuel food insecurity, the Program implements Social Analysis and Action (SAA), a key gender transformative approach that triggers shifts in gender norms at the individual, household, community, and policy level. This progress marker assessment specifically measured behaviors and practices at play for the different study participants before Takunda’s Social Analysis and Action (SAA) interventions and it confirmed some of the findings of the Takunda gender Analysis study held in December 2021. The progress marker assessment measured gender outcomes/behaviors as defined by the communities, whereas the gender analysis assessed program-wide challenges experienced by different groups as defined by the program. Read More...

Titukulane Gender Progress Marker Monitoring Report

Titukulane is a five-year, US $75 million Resilience Food Security Activity funded by the Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance. The project is led by the Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE) in partnership with Emmanuel International (EI), the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), the National Smallholders Farmers’ Association of Malawi (NASFAM), Save the Children (SC), and WaterAid. Implemented in 19 Traditional Authorities (T/As) of two southern districts of Malawi (Zomba and Mangochi), Titukulane directly impacts 510,910 individuals – including adolescent girls and boys aged 10 to 19, and young women and men aged 20 to 29 – who face an uncertain future as farming becomes less viable. Titukulane offers an integrated and gender-responsive package of interventions across the following program elements: maternal and child health; nutrition and water, sanitation, and hygiene, (WASH); agriculture sector capacity; microenterprise productivity; civic participation; and capacity building, preparedness, and planning. The program works across three purpose areas:

Purpose 1: Increased, diversified, sustainable incomes for ultra-poor, chronically vulnerable households (HHs), women and youth.
Purpose 2: Nutritional status among children < 5, adolescent girls, and women of reproductive age improved; and
Purpose 3: Increased institutional and local capacities to reduce risk and increase resilience among very poor and chronically vulnerable households in alignment with the National Resilience Strategy.

Gender integration is a crosscutting component among all activities and project emphasizes the critical importance and benefits of increased voice, participation and leadership of women and youths, including young women. A Gender Analysis was initially conducted for Titukulane in 2020 to identify context specific gender barriers, inequalities, and potential risks that could negatively affect the achievement of the project’s expected outcomes, as well as to assess how these constraints could be addressed in Zomba and Mangochi. Read More...

2023 Participant Based Survey: Titukulane Project – PaBS Outcome Report

Despite decades of robust government and donor investments in livelihoods, food security, nutrition, and resilience, over 50% of the population lives below the poverty line. Previous activities have not sufficiently reduced the number of chronically food and nutrition insecure households nor effectively enhanced the capacity of local and government structures to implement resilience focused policies and actions. To address these issues, the Government of Malawi developed a National Resilience Strategy 2018-2030 (NRS) to guide investments in agriculture, reduce impacts and improve recovery from shocks, promote household resilience, strengthen the management of Malawi’s natural resources, and facilitate effective coordination between government institutions, civil society organizations and development partners. CARE and consortium partners designed the Titukulane Resilience Food Security Activity (RFSA) which means “let us work together for development” in the local Chichewa language—to support pilot implementation of NRS in Zomba and mangochi districts. The Titukulane RFSA, implemented by CARE International in Malawi (CIM), aims to achieve sustainable, equitable, and resilient food and nutrition security for ultra-poor and chronically vulnerable households. Specifically, Titukulane is designed to increase households’ abilities to deal with shocks without experiencing food insecurity following a three-purpose approach:

1. Increased diversified, sustainable, and equitable incomes for ultra-poor, chronically vulnerable households, women, and youth.
2. Improved nutritional status among children under 5 years of age, adolescent girls, and women of reproductive age.
3. Increased institutional and local capacities to reduce risk and increase resilience among poor and very poor households in alignment with the Malawi NRS.

To meet these three purposes, the Titukulane RFSA provides households with a package of interventions, including: Care Groups with Nutritional Cash Transfers (NCT), Farmer Field Business Schools and crop marketing support, Village Savings and Loan Associations, Adolescent nutrition, Irrigation farming, Youth vocational training including start-up capital and Gender dialogues. Read More...

HATUTAN II Baseline McGovern Dole Food for Education

In this report, we present findings from the baseline assessment of the HATUTAN II (Hahán ne’ebé Atu fó Tulun ho Nutrisaun no Edukasaun or Food to Support Nutrition and Education) program. This program is a five year (2022 – 2027), US$26.5 million initiative that will work in partnership with the Government of Timor-Leste and development stakeholders to address two strategic objectives: improved literacy of school-aged children and increased use of health, nutrition, and dietary practices. The program will operate in 378 schools and communities within four of Timor-Leste’s most deprived municipalities, Ainaro, Ermera, Manatuto, and Oe-cusse, to support an estimated 171,232 target beneficiaries including school-aged children, teacher, school administrators, and community members. Key activities will include support for the government-run School Feeding Program (SFP) and trainings targeting teachers, school administrators, and community members.

The baseline assessment finds that grade 2 students’ literacy abilities are very weak and many students remain unable to read words. The average overall score on the literacy assessment was only 10.9% for intervention students, and only 18.2% of intervention students demonstrated the ability to read and understand the meaning of a grade-level passage. Scores were highest—though still low in absolute terms—for letter recognition, at 21.8% for intervention students. Furthermore, many grade 2 students have no literacy abilities, with 21.8% of intervention students scoring 0% overall on the literacy assessment.

We find moderate use of engaging teaching practices in most intervention municipalities, with relatively more frequent use of these practices in Ermera and less frequent use in Oe-cusse. However, across all municipalities, substantial potential remains to continue improving the use of engaging teaching practices, as well as reducing the use of traditional, unengaging teaching practices including copying from the board and repeating after the teacher. Furthermore, corporal punishment was still observed to be used by some teachers in intervention schools and is likely underreported in our data due to social desirability bias. Read More...

Alma Llanera II – año 2-Informe Final

El presente estudio tiene como objetivo evaluar el nivel de logro de los objetivos y las estrategias implementadas en el proyecto Alma Llanera durante el periodo setiembre 2022 – agosto 2023, que permitan generar aprendizajes y dar cuenta de los productos, resultados, efectos y mecanismos de sostenibilidad.
Alma Llanera es un proyecto desarrollado por CARE Perú, gracias al financiamiento de la Oficina de Población, Refugiados y Migración (PRM) del Departamento de Estado de los Estados Unidos de América, en respuesta a la crisis humanitaria originada por la movilidad de humana de personas refugiadas y migrantes al Perú. El objetivo de este proyecto es brindar apoyo y asistencia a personas migrantes y refugiadas, priorizando a mujeres, niñas y jóvenes, beneficiando a comunidades en las regiones de Callao, Lima, La Libertad, Piura y Tumbes. Read More...

Alma Llanera II – año 2-Estudio de satisfacción sobre servicios promovidos por el proyectos

CARE Perú viene ejecutando el Proyecto “Alma Llanera” (el Proyecto) en las regiones de Lima, Callao, La Libertad, Piura y Tumbes, cuyo objetivo es que los refugiados venezolanos y los miembros vulnerables de las comunidades de acogida en Perú tengan acceso seguro y constante a servicios de protección y asistencia humanitaria. El Proyecto busca alcanzar su objetivo a través de la promoción de un mayor acceso a servicios de protección, servicios de salud, y servicios de salud mental y apoyo psicosocial.
El objetivo del estudio es medir el nivel de satisfacción de la población migrante o refugiada venezolana atendida por el Proyecto Fase II en los servicios de protección, salud y salud mental y apoyo psicosocial. Read More...

Línea de base para el proyecto “Competitividad en crianza de animales menores”-Informe Final

El proyecto “Competitividad de Crianza de Animales Menores” busca mejorar los ingresos económicos de pequeños productores rurales dedicados a la crianza de animales menores en cinco distritos de las provincias de Lima e Ica, en Perú. El proyecto se divide en tres componentes: acceso a mercados inclusivos, gestión empresarial y alianzas estratégicas e incidencia política. Como parte del proyecto, se realizó un estudio de línea de base utilizando métodos cuantitativos y cualitativos para evaluar el nivel inicial de los valores de los indicadores y las estrategias a implementar. El estudio utilizó encuestas, entrevistas y grupos focales para obtener información de los productores, actores clave y técnicos de las zonas de intervención. La muestra fue de 386 casos en total, con 193 en Lima e Ica respectivamente. El objetivo es mejorar la cadena de valor de producción de animales menores identificando obstáculos y fortalezas en las zonas de intervención. El estudio identificó una serie de desafíos en la producción y comercialización de estos animales. Read More...

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