Here in CARE International’s Evaluation e-Library we make all of CARE’s external evaluation reports available for public access in accordance with our Accountability Policy.

With these accumulated project evaluations CARE International hopes to share our collective knowledge not only internally but with a wider audience.

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Access Protection Empowerment Accountability and Leadership (APEAL) II project Endline Evaluation

The APEAL II project was a follow on project to APEAL I. The purpose of APEAL 2020 was to Enhance multi-sectoral responses by providing targeted life- saving protection, mental health, Psychosocial support and inclusive services to Congolese refugees and vulnerable host communities in Kyangwali and Kyaka II settlements. APEAL II deferred from APEAL I by; increasing the Consortium members from six (6) to nine (9) after incorporating three (3) organizations, programme scope included changes from GBV to SGBV, disability and Inclusion Services and strengthening the capacity of community structures. The community structures were strengthened to identify, respond, support and refer persons in need of MHPSS, comprehensive rehabilitation, disability and inclusion, protection and SGBV services. The Project operated in a COVID 19 environment which was not present in APEAL 1. As such, the project embedded a specific focus on COVID 19 response.
The European Civil Protection & Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO) funded the Project with Euro3,462,889.15 spanning from May 01, 2020 to April 30, 2021.
The project targeted 40,000 beneficiaries split between Kyaka II and Kyangwali refugee settlements and distributed support to 20% of surrounding Host communities and 80% of Refugees. The APEAL II intended to achieve: Enhanced access to timely protection, SGBV, MHPSS and disability and inclusion services, Improved protection mainstreaming and strengthen the capacity of community structures, duty bearers and stakeholders, provide extra capacity in nutrition screening for young children, pregnant and lactating mothers and supportive advocacy for standards setting, and harmonized approaches to refugee protection and MHPSS at the national level.
The APEAL II project end line evaluation was conducted to assess change and impact by comparing data from before and after for APEAL Project implementation. The end line evaluation was constructed on a cross-sectional assessment of intervention focus area, the individual refugees and host community members. Qualitative and quantitative data collection methods were applied with the former utilized to obtain information on project relevance, effectiveness and outcomes from Project key stakeholders including beneficiaries through key informant interviews and focus group discussions. Read More...

Worker Wellbeing Project in Bangladesh, Indonesia and Vietnam Endline Evaluation

This endline evaluation was conducted to assess change and impact resulting from the Worker Wellbeing Project in Bangladesh, Indonesia and Vietnam. It was carried out independently by Rapid Asia to conduct an endline evaluation of the Worker Well-Being Project to provide a final report to the donor, capture details on impact and analyse lessons learned to be applied to future programming. The purpose of the Worker Wellbeing Project is to improve wellbeing for garment workers through access to dignified working conditions, legal and social protections and gender-equitable relationships. Findings from the evaluation will also be used to learn from and develop the Dignified Work portfolio and promote women's economic justice worldwide.

This evaluation sought to identify the extent to which the project achieved meaningful change in women workers’ lives both at home, community and in the workplace through the activities in each country by identifying outcomes from project activities and outputs to understand linkages between those outcomes and the projects outputs.

Key Findings
The EKATA engagement model
The EKATA model proved to be highly successful in greatly enacting change for women garment workers in the factories and at home. Women workers consistently highlighted the usefulness of the training had on their daily lives. Through the training, the women learnt how to reclaim those voices and negotiate at work for better conditions.
Engagement with men
Recognising the crucial role that men play in delivering gender-transformative impac by engaging them as stakeholders proved to be successful. Men were found to be receptive in recognising gender as a social construct, which then formed the basis for understanding the value of women and why domestic responsibilities should be shared and that sexual harassment of women is unacceptable.
Duty bearers’ responsiveness
Garment factory management staff believed they could see not only the benefit of the project but also an improvement in the conditions of the women workers, which they recognised as having a positive impact on their business. Employers appeared to welcome women garment workers raising their concerns, mainly due to the workers' improved communication skills.
Outcomes and their relation to activities
9
Beneficiaries of EKATA training found the sessions on financial management, gender equality, labour rights, leadership and communication the most valuable and impactful in their daily lives. It was found however, that such training alone would not be enough to deliver true impact. Evidence demonstrated that establishing committees from where women can launch collective demands was a significant trigger to exercising women’s rights.
Project sustainability
There is great potential for women recognising labour violations and unfair practices, gender inequality, and the capacity to take action without a considerable reliance on outside support. Sustainability is also underpinned by network activities, namely the linking of community worker association to local federations and trade unions and local service providers. Read More...

ASHAR Alo Project (Action for Supporting the Host Communities: Adaptation and Resilience)

ASHAR Alo (Action for Supporting the Host Communities: Adaptation and Resilience), meaning ‘Light of Hope’ in Bangla.
The project activities are focused on Jaliyapalong, Haldiapalang,Ratna Palong, PalongKhali union of Ukhiya Upzila and Dakshin Mithachari and Chakmarkul union of Ramu Upazila. CARE aims to strengthen host communities' resilience by enhancing community-based disaster risk reduction (DRR), upgrading infrastructure, and providing livelihoods opportunities across shelter, settlement, and WASH sectors. The project also responds to the urgent protection and gender-based violence needs in the host community. Activities are being undertaken in collaboration with government and community stakeholders and UN and NGO actors.
Cox’s Bazar is amongst the poorest districts of Bangladesh. In Ukhia, 33% of people live below the poverty line, and 17% below extreme poverty. This is linked to the region's poor land quality and high risk of natural disaster. Since the Myanmar refugee influx in the fall of 2017, over 902,984 refugees or 201,150 households (HH)s have settled in Ukhiya, and Teknaf.1 Despite limited resources, the local host community population welcomed the arriving refugees during the fall of 2017, sharing food, shelter, and supplies. However, the refugees’ extended presence has strained the community’s already scarce resources. Within the sub-region, Ukhia and Teknaf have been particularly affected, with 336,000 residents directly impacted by the refugee influx,2 leading to a deterioration of relations between these host community members and the refugees.
The region is highly prone to natural disasters; it experiences regular cyclones, floods, and landslides with triple global average precipitation3. Both individual homes and community shelters are weak and in disrepair. Over 40% of households do not meet Sphere standards; they are overcrowded, fragile and highly susceptible to damage and destruction by strong winds, rain, and flooding4. Land degradation, including the daily removal of over 700 metric tons of firewood from the area, has led to a loss of topsoil, coupled with the heightened risk of flash flooding, which has increased the potential destruction5. The accumulation of improperly disposed waste and poor pre-existing drainage systems aggravate these risks and increase the likelihood of damage to host communities6. Furthermore, community response plans and structures are ill-equipped to safeguard or offer substantive protection. [19 pages] Read More...

The Safe Service for Minority Population (SSMP) Project 2019-2021

This is the End of Project Evaluation Report for Safe Services for Minority Populations (SSMP) Project which was implemented in Ratanak Kiri province- Banlung, Oyadav, and Andong Meas districts. The Project was funded by the Australia-Cambodia Cooperation for Equitable Sustainable Services (ACCESS). It started on 30 September 2019 and will end on 30 September 2021 (following a no cost extension). The goal of the project was for Persons with disabilities and women affected by GBV benefit from access to sustainable, quality, inclusive services
In order to conduct the evaluation, data was collected through a comprehensive literature review and fieldwork. The literature review was conducted reviewing reports and documents from the SSMP Project and also other relevant external publications. Field work was conducted in August 2021. The interview questions were based on the CARE’s monitoring and evaluation tools and updated to capture information needed for the Evaluation Read More...

THE ZIMBABWE DISASTER RAPID RESPONSE MECHANISM

Globally, there are concerted efforts being directed towards reducing disaster risks particularly in developing countries where the vulnerability of people, their assets and livelihoods are increasing du to natural hazards. The international principle of common but differentiated responsibilities also sees different forms of support being channelled from the more developed countries to those less developed. In the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) where Zimbabwe is domiciled, there is a rising trend of vulnerabilities to droughts, floods, storms, and epidemics among others. These hazards arbitrarily impose a heavy burden on majority of the poorer population, worsening their food insecurity, exposing many of them to gender-based violence, communicable diseases, reduced access to pertinent health services and compounded socio-economic setbacks. In that respect, Care International, Dan Church Aid and Plan International established a Rapid Response Management Unit (RRMU) to implement a comprehensive rapid response framework for rapid onset emergencies in seven (7) provinces in Zimbabwe from February 2020 to June 2021. The targeted provinces were Harare, Masvingo, Bulawayo, Midlands, Manicaland, Matabeleland South and Matabeleland North. Read More...

COVID-19 Response in Tabora Tanzania (Bloomberg)

CARE Tanzania builds on its successful partnership with the Government of Tanzania’s Regional Health Management Team (RHMT) in Tabora Region. Leveraging funding from the Government of Canada as part of the Tabora
Maternal Newborn Health Initiative (TAMANI), CARE’s Bloomberg-funded COVID-19 activities builds on efforts to improve access of and quality of health services across health facilities and communities to challenge harmful gender norms.
In partnership with the Government of Tanzania, activities cover all 8 districts in Tabora Region. CARE provides technical support and training to Community Health Workers, who are supported by the government in their duties.With the onset of COVID-19, CARE Tanzania quickly implemented a digital survey to understand the impacts of COVID-19. The majority of female respondents reported increases in gender-based violence and harassment, with COVID-19 restricting women’s access to resources and decision-making. Read More...

The Final Evaluation of the Opportunities for Mother and Infants Development Project

The Opportunities for Mother and Infant Development (OMID) is a three year project (from 2018 to 2021), funded by The Glaxo Smith Kline (GSK). The current phase of the project has been implemented in the two districts (16th and 17th) in Kabul city. The main purpose of the project is to improve the health and reduce the mortality among mothers, newborns and children in the most vulnerable communities through community-based interventions facilitated and delivered by Community Health Workers (CHWs) and Community Midwives (CMWs).

Overall, the project has been effective in achieving the intended outcomes. Access and utilization of Maternal and Neonatal Child Health (MNCH) services have improved as demonstrated by achievement of the project’s key performance indicators across the continuum of care.

This included increases in the %:
- of women reporting ANC utilization
- of women who undertook the first ANC visit before by the 3rd trimester of their pregnancy
- of those who knew the date that the baby was expected to arrive
- of those women who had a plan where she would deliver the baby
- of those women who believed health facility is safer to deliver there

And decreases in the %:
- of those who didn’t go for ANC and believed it is not important
- of those who didn’t go for ANC and indicated the high cost of care as reason

The community systems strengthening undertaken by the project through establishment of community based health facilities and CHWs was effective in increasing health awareness and adoption of positive MNCH behaviors and practices. Read More...

HBCC (Hygiene and Behavior Change Coalition) Project: Inclusive Communities – Changing behaviors to respond to COVID-19

The “Promoting safer hygiene practices for women and girls to remain safe and live better lives project has been implemented between the 23rd of July 2020 and the 31st of August 2021 through CARE International in Jordan and funded by Unilever-UKAID HBCC (Hygiene Behaviour Change Coalition). The project’s overall objective was to support the most vulnerable women and girls in conflict communities, refugee, asylum and host populations within the Syrian crisis region to improve their key hygiene behaviours and be better equipped to protect themselves from COVID-19 transmission through mass awareness, interpersonal communication and digital media communication.
CARE Jordan implemented a package of multiple interventions which includes mass media, digital communication, and in some cases targeted face-to-face interactions complemented by the provision of hygiene and dignity kits to promote key hygiene behaviours of the targeted beneficiaries. The mass media and digital campaign, which targeted community members who live in Amman, Zarqa/Azraq town, Irbid, Mafraq, and Azraq Refugee Camp, but also reached beyond these areas in particular with the mass media intervention; focused on a variety of messages in line with the national/local Health Service approved guidelines as well as some of the Unilever Global assets like the PASSWORD Campaigns, Snake and Ladder game, and Mobile Doctorni. Messages covered issues of prevention, protection, safety, security and where to seek early support when showing signs and symptoms of COVID-19. Read More...

Economic support for COVID affected Women -Tiffany Foundation project.

The objective is to assess the extent to which the program had achieved its strategic objective of improved food security to drought-affected households in the target locations according to a baseline survey carried out earlier in April. The study focused on assessing the status of vulnerable women, whose economic mainstay has been affected by the recurrent shocks & stress and had difficulties accessing essential services. Also, the maternal health situation reflects the prevalences of morbidity and mortality cases caused either during pregnancy or childbirth/delivery. The delay of rains, desert locust invasion, and supply chain disruption with COVID19 hazards had adversely affected food security and nutrition outcomes, which exacerbated vulnerable households’ nutritional status and wellbeing. Read More...

END LINE REVIEW FOR HBCC PROJECT: INCLUSIVE COMMUNITIES: CHANGING BEHAVIORS TO RESPOND TO COVID-19

The end-line survey was commissioned by CARE International in Somalia to assess the overall change outcomes of the COVID-19 Hygiene Behavior Change Campaign as per the project’s theory of change and to identify key lessons learned for the campaign that could inform future strategies. The project was implemented through an extensive mass media, digital and interpersonal hygiene promotion information, and messaging campaign in communities and institutions supported by the provision of water supply and handwashing kits and infrastructure as well as provision of relevant Personal Protective Equipment-PPE, as per the context. Read More...

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