Nutrition

Baseline Survey in East and South Darfur Focused on Health, Nutrition and WASH

The humanitarian situation in Sudan has continued to deteriorate since 2018, where the number of people in need of humanitarian assistance steadily rose from an estimated 700,000 to a total of 5.5M individuals. Across Sudan, 3.8 million people are urgently in need of WASH assistance, 5.2 million people are in urgent need of access to basic primary health care services, and a total of 2.8 million children and Pregnant and Lactating Women (PLW) suffering from acute malnutrition. Darfur remains an epicenter of large-scale protracted displacement.

There have been limited baseline assessments conducted in CARE’s project areas due to the recent political uncertainties, insecurity, staff capacity and funding constraints. The assessment interviewed 277 households.
* 53% of people (46%m, 56%f) have good knowledge on positive nutrition practices.
* The survey found out that of the women interviewed, 62% were aware and had good knowledge of exclusive breastfeeding
* disease incidence averaged at 44% across the study area.
* 66% of the respondents still use unsafe drinking water sources;
* 34% of the respondents having access to adequate sanitation but still about 28% of respondents confirmed that at least one member of their HH practiced open defecation.
* 65% of the respondents being able to mention at least 3 critical times to perform hand washing.
* 21% of the respondents said women were actively involved as members of WASH committees within their communities.
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Rapid Gender Analysis: Research Report

Drought, worsened by the effects of El-Nino is having a devastating impact on the lives and livelihoods of Ethiopians, and according to the Government and the inter-agency mid-Meher and Meher seasonal assessments, the number of people that will require food assistance in 2016 increased from 8.2 million in October 2015 to 10.2 million in December 2015, making Ethiopia home to the largest acutely food insecure population in the world. Recognising that crisis can further exacerbate existing vulnerabilities and gender norms, CARE Ethiopia sought to better understand the gender dynamics at the household and community level in order to improve the design of its interventions and build on the strengths and capacities of drought affected households. To help achieve this aim, CARE developed a bespoke participatory Rapid Gender Assessment (RGA) approach, allowing for a diverse group of staff to collect information quickly from a sample of affected communities in zones of East Hararghe, West Hararghe, South Gondar and Afar. The RGA focused on the existence and impact of any changing gender dynamics in drought affected households and communities Read More...

Evaluation d’impact Genre de la réponse de CARE à la crise du Bassin du Lac Tchad au Cameroun, Niger et Tchad

La crise du BLT, née du conflit armé au Nord Nigéria qui s’est étendu au Cameroun, Niger et Tchad a créé une crise humanitaire qui a entrainé le déplacement de 4.025.486 personnes au niveau de ces quatre pays (OIM DTM, Avril 2018). Cette crise révèle une dimension protection sans précèdent avec notamment des violences multiformes à l’encontre des femmes et de filles (kidnapping, violences et abus sexuelles, transformées en kamikaze), des violences physiques à l’encontre des hommes et jeunes garçons (décapités ou enrôlés de force dans les combats) ; la dislocation des milliers de familles a laissé aux femmes et aux enfants la responsabilité de se prendre en charge leurs familles. Cette évaluation a pour objectif d’analyser l’impact de l’intégration du genre dans la qualité de la réponse de CARE dans les trois pays du bassin du Lac Tchad que sont Le Cameroun, le Niger et le Tchad. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Cyclone Idai Response Sofala Province, Mozambique

On 14 March 2019, Tropical Cyclone Idai made landfall near Beira City, leaving devastating loss of life and large-scale destruction of assets and infrastructure. In the days that followed, entire villages were submerged as floodwaters rose causing mass displacement. From early on in the response it was clear that certain groups such as female headed-households (FHH), persons with disabilities (PwD), the elderly and children (boys and girls) were some of the most at risk, both in the immediate response and in recovery. This was further confirmed during this Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA).

CARE had identified four main districts in Sofala province in which to focus its assessment based on planned operational locations: Beira, Dondo (with a focus on Samora Machel), Nhamatanda (with a focus on Mutechira) and Buzi (with a focus on Guara Guara). The RGA was built up progressively over the data collection period, using 30 focus group discussions (FGDs), 14 key informant interviews (KII), 55 household surveys, and observations, in both rural and urban areas, transit, accommodation centres and with communities. Data collection took place between the 6 and15 April 2019. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Mosul crisis, Iraq

Gender plays an important role in the humanitarian response for the Mosul crisis due to family separation, stigmatisation of survivors of gender based violence (GBV) and their children , lack of access to education and employment particularly for women and girls from prior to the Mosul crisis, IDPs being confined to camps and the severe gendered psychological impact for women, men, boys and girls previously under armed group occupation. The Rapid Gender Analysis in Mosul has been carried out remotely and uses a range of methods to collect data and information. It is based on the CARE Emergency Pocketbook’s Rapid Gender Analysis tool and draws from the IASC Gender Handbook in Humanitarian Action. This Rapid Gender Analysis has the following objectives:

1. To analyse and understand the different impact that the Mosul crisis has on women, men, girls and boys and their current needs and capacities.
2. To inform humanitarian programming on the Mosul crisis based on the different needs of women, men, boys and girls particularly
3. Identify key priorities in terms of advocacy on gender and protection issues Read More...

Tropical Cyclone Gita Kingdom of Tonga Rapid Gender Analysis Sub-focus on Shelter and Food Security and Livelihoods

TC Gita passed through the Kingdom of Tonga on 12 February 2018 as a Category 4 cyclone. Seventy five percent of the population or 79,556 people have been affected. The island of Tongatapu where the capital Nuku’alofa is located and the nearby island of ‘Eua suffered the greatest impact.

This rapid gender analysis (RGA) is designed to provide initial information about gender roles, responsibilities, capacities and vulnerabilities of women, men, girls and boys, SOGIE and other marginalised people prior to and after
TC Gita. It provides a snapshot of the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of particular groups in the
affected communities. Taking into consideration the tight time-frame, rapidly changing context and limited information.
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Assessment on the Impact of the El Niño Event in PNG, October 2015

Papua New Guinea (PNG) is currently experiencing the effects of an El Niño event, which includes warmer weather and significantly reduced rainfall. According to the National Weather Service (NWS) in Papua New Guinea and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, this dry hot spell, which began in May 2015, will continue into early 20161.

In order to better understand the needs and capabilities of affected communities, CARE International in PNG (CARE PNG) undertook a series of assessments in three droughtaffected provinces between September 21 and October 2 2015. In parallel to the needs assessments, CARE PNG did a rapid gender analysis on the differing impact of the drought on women, men, girls and boys. The assessments were done in OburaWonenara (Eastern Highlands Province), Menyamya (Morobe) and Gumine (Chimbu) districts in communities not yet covered by National Disaster Center (NDC)-led assessment teams. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis COVID-19 Pacific Region, 26 March 2020 [version 1]

Globally, including the Pacific, development and humanitarian settings pose particular challenges for infectious disease prevention and control. For the Pacific, COVID-19 presents a range of contextual challenges. These include multiple islands, vast distances and limited resources. In most Pacific Countries, access to quality health services is limited, due to a lack of infrastructure, equipment, and qualified personnel.

This preliminary Rapid Gender Analysis has the following objectives:
● To analyse and understand the different impacts that the COVID-19 potentially has on women, men,
girls and boys and other vulnerable groups in the Pacific context

● To inform humanitarian programming in the Pacific region based on the different needs of women,
men, boys and girls with a particular focus on Gender Based Violence (GBV), Health, Water,
sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) and Women’s Economic Empowerment. Read More...

Rapport Etude de Base ASANGARA

Situé dans la pointe Sud ’Ouest d’Haïti, le département de la Grand ‘Anse est exposé aux risques de sécheresse, d’inondation, de glissement de terrain et de tremblement de terre4. Il a été frappé par la sécheresse de 2015/2016, fortement dévasté par l’ouragan Matthew de catégorie 4 en octobre 2016 et également affecté par les intempéries d’avril/mai 2017.

C’est dans ce contexte d’insécurité alimentaire aigue, de catastrophes répétées, de problèmes nutritionnels et d’insécurité économique que le consortium composé de CARE, AAH et KPGA vont débuter avec le projet d’Appui à la Sécurité Alimentaire, au Renforcement Agricole et à l’Amélioration Nutritionnelle dans la Grande-Anse (ASARANGA) au niveau des communes de Beaumont, de Jérémie et de Roseaux.

Le projet ASARANGA a pour objectif principal de contribuer à l’augmentation de la sécurité alimentaire et nutritionnelle des groupes vulnérables affectés par le passage de l'ouragan Matthew dans les communes de Jérémie, Beaumont et Roseaux. Read More...

Final Evaluation Report: Nourishing the Future II Project, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica

The CARE-Cargill Nourishing the Future II project was implemented in Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica between September 2016 and August 2019 (36 months). Its primary objective was to help producers and women micro-entrepreneurs improve the quality of life of their families, assuring their food security and the sustainable management of natural resources.

Six impact indicators and 32 outcome indicators were tracked for Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua, and 11 indicators were applied in Costa Rica, where we implemented a subset of interventions (food security, nutrition and hygiene). Overall, when comparing indicators to their baselines, the average effectiveness was 72%, with Honduras achieving the best results and Nicaragua having less favorable results due to ongoing social, political and economic issues.

Among the most relevant findings of the evaluation were the success of Cargill’s inclusive business model and value chains in integrating small producers and micro-entrepreneurs into markets; an increase in the resilience of households to the effects of climate change; an increase in the use of sustainable agricultural practices; and an increase in incomes as a result of market sales, access to financial services and related training. Moreover, we observed the target beneficiaries working together in rural savings unions, cooperatives and producer associations, supporting the provision of financial, technical and marketing services to their members. Regarding food security and nutrition, our work with schools led to an increase in the consumption of healthy foods at the household level. The project increased access to nutrient-rich foods through community, school and family gardens as well as increased knowledge and application of good practices in sanitation and hygiene.
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