Baseline

Vulnerability to HIV & AIDS: A social Research on Cross Border Mobile Population from Bangladesh to India

There are a growing number of people migrating between Bangladesh, Nepal and India. Mobility has long been linked with heightened vulnerability to HIV & AIDS. While overall
HIV prevalence is low in Bangladesh and Nepal, there is a growing concern that vulnerable mobile populations are forming a bridge between high prevalence areas of India and low prevalence areas in Bangladesh and Nepal. Enhancing Mobile Populations’ Access to HIV & AIDS Services Information and Support (EMPHASIS) is a regional program being implemented by CARE Bangladesh, CARE India and CARE Nepal and led by CARE International UK (CIUK) to reduce AIDS related vulnerabilities among mobile populations crossing the borders of Bangladesh and Nepal into India. This 5-year (August 2009 – July 2014) program, is funded by the Big Lottery Fund (BIG) of United Kingdom.

Baseline Research on cross border migration was initiated to understand the drivers of mobility, access to services for migrants at source and destination, and to understand the risk and vulnerabilities associated with migration and HIV & AIDS. The study was conducted using quantitative methods and a separate qualitative study was conducted to enhance and complement the quantitative data. [57 Pages] Read More...

WAYREP Baseline Report


WAYREP’s overall objective is to “Strengthen the resilience of refugee and Ugandan women, girls and youth to live a life free from violence (LFFV) in Uganda”. WAYREP focuses on women and girls’ empowerment within the context of some of Uganda’s most pressing current challenges such as rapid urbanization, regular and high rates of displacement and migration across and within Uganda’s borders and a very young and largely unemployed population. In 2020, this fragile context was further exacerbated with the outbreak of the Coronavirus pandemic (COVID 19) not only in terms of its health implications, but also in terms of its impact on livelihoods, safety and security. WAYREP is built on the hypothesis that Gender Based Violence (GBV) has two main drivers: gender inequality and poverty. This is exacerbated by displacement whether as a refugee or as an urban dweller coming from rural Uganda. WAYREP’s theory of change therefore states that: if refugee and vulnerable Ugandan women and girls have access to dignified livelihood opportunities, and if the gender, social and cultural norms that perpetuate GBV are challenged and minimized, then the likelihood of resorting to negative coping mechanisms - including GBV like early and forced marriage or commercial sex - will significantly reduce and women and girls’ self- reliance will increase.
The project seeks to achieve four result areas namely;
1. Enhanced sustainable and dignified livelihood for women and youth
2. Reduction of the acceptance of GBV
3. Enhanced psychosocial support to survivors of GBV
4. Increased accountability of the Government of Uganda (GoU) on the implementation of relevant
frameworks for women and girls’ protection and rights
The project is being implemented in Gulu Municipality (Pece and Bardege Divisions), Arua Municipality (River Oli Division, Omugo Settlement zones 4, 5, and 6) and Omugo Sub-county (in Obi, Angazi, Anufira, Duku, Boora and Ndapi Parishes).
This report is 81 pages long. Read More...

BASELINE SURVEY REPORT WOMEN’S VOICES AND LEADERSHIP PROJECT (CENTRAL EQUATORIA, EASTERN EQUATORIA & JONGLEI STATES)

CARE South Sudan, with funding from Global Affairs Canada, implements the Women’s Voice and Leadership (WVL) project in the Eastern Equatorial, Central Equatorial and Jonglei states. WVL is a four-year project that supports the capacity and activities of local and national women-led organizations (WLO) seeking to empower women and girls, advance the protection of women and girls’ rights and achieve gender equality.
The baseline survey purposely informs the establishment of realistic and achievable targets and provides a point of reference against which progress on or towards the achievement of outcomes will be assessed, monitored and evaluated. This will also inform project implementation performance review process, maintain accountability by informing what difference the project is making and provide justification to the stakeholders for programme intervention. The study was also used to assess the political economy that underpins the operating environment for WLOs. The findings and recommendations of the baseline will help to provide strategic and operational guide to shape the implementation process. Read More...

WOMEN’S VOICE AND LEADERSHIP (WVL) KENYA Project Baseline

This report presents a synthesis of findings from the baseline evaluation carried out for the Women’s Voice and Leadership program in Kenya. This program is funded by Global Affairs Canada (GAC) and is being delivered by CARE Canada, CARE Kenya, Uraia Trust, The Centre for Rights Education and Awareness (CREAW), Community Advocacy and Awareness (CRAWN Trust) and Urgent Action Fund (UAF- Africa). The program’s goal is to support the capacity and activities of local and national women’s organizations and movements seeking to empower women and girls, advance the protection of women’s and girls’ rights, and achieve gender equality with the ultimate outcome being the “increased enjoyment of human rights by women and girls and the enjoyment of gender equality in Kenya”. The overall objectives of the baseline were to provide: 1) the baseline data for the WVL Kenya project indicators against which progress will be measured, and 2) provide recommendations on improving the current project Performance Measurement Framework (PMF) and Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) Plan.
The baseline employed a mixed methodology approach, combining both quantitative and qualitative approaches. The study was undertaken in a feasible manner given the COVID 19 reality and associated safety precautions, limitations on movement and convening. The study findings drew analysis from secondary data, self-assessment questionnaires, key informant interviews and quantitative interviews through phone calls. The study engaged a wide range of stakeholders including: women’s rights organizations (WROs), women rights’ network members, staff of the 4 partner organizations and CARE staff. All the network members engaged were female as well as 83% of representatives of WROs and partners. Slightly above half (53%) of WROs representatives engaged were organization leaders while 86% of partner representatives were staff. Read More...

Improving Sexual and Reproductive Health through Reducing Early Marriage in Remote Ethnic Communities in Sekong Province, Lao PDR

Lao PDR has the highest rates of early marriage in the region, even though the law sets the age of marriage at 18. Young brides are more vulnerable to sexual abuse from their partners and to unintended pregnancy. Lao PDR has the highest adolescent pregnancy rate in the region due to early marriage, limited knowledge of sexual & reproductive health, and limited access to appropriate services. The overall goal of the project is improved sexual reproductive and maternal health (SRMH) in remote ethnic communities in Sekong Province. The action contributes to reduced child marriage, as well as providing SRMH knowledge and developing youth friendly health infrastructure. The action engages the whole community to reflect on harmful traditions and their negative impact on the development of girls, and to create an enabling environment for girls. CARE also provides organizational and technical capacity development to local governments and partners to enable them to deliver key messages on the link between child marriage and pregnancy risk to the targeted ethnic minorities.
This report is 17 pages long. Read More...

Baseline of “Mujeres en Empresa” project

This Baseline Report of the Women in Business-Strengthening the Approach Project provides information on the initial values ​​of the project indicators within the entire results chain, at the level of result, effect, process and product. This project corresponds to a third implementation phase that runs from April 2020 to March 2022, after two previous stages and successive development. The purpose of this project is "To scale the business entrepreneurship models of women developed by the project, through investment and commitment from the public and private sectors", through an intervention in 34 districts located in three regions ( Piura, Junín and Huancavelica).
The baseline of the project was carried out between the months of August and November 2020 and provided relevant starting information for the project. A major scale challenge represents women entrepreneurs who in a proportion less than 20% apply business management practices in the 34 districts targeted by the project. This population has a high level of informality, low educational level, medium-high poverty level of deprivation and is located for the most part in urban areas.
This report is 124 pages long. Read More...

Baseline Study on “Improving lives of Rohingya refugees and host community members in Bangladesh through sexual and reproductive healthcare integrated with gender-based violence prevention and response” Project

In response to the health and protection needs of the Rohingya refugees and the host communities in Cox ́s Bazar, CARE is implementing the project “Improving lives of Rohingya refugees and host community members in Bangladesh through sexual and reproductive healthcare integrated with gender-based violence prevention and response” with funding support by German Federal Foreign Office. This is a two year project targeting Rohingya refuges of camp 11, 12, 15 and 16 and vulnerable host communities of Jaliapalong union for GBV and SRH services.
To achieve improved sexual and reproductive health, GBV survivor support and protection from GBV of Rohingya Refugees in Cox ́s Bazar in Bangladesh, this project works across three outcomes. Firstly general and sexual and reproductive (SRH) health services will be provided through decetralised health centers which will rove around the target areas to provide services to people at their doorsteps. Improved Menstrual Hygiene management (MHM) is the second outcome of this project. There is an absence of space for washing and drying menstrual hyiene materials, leading women and girls to risk their health by drying their materials indoors. Through this project, therefore, two MHM spaces will be constructed next to CARE’s existing women and girls’ safe spaces (WGSS) in camps 12 and 16. The construction will be accompanied with training to ensure that the spaces are used appropriate. The third project outcome focuses on prevention of and response to gender-based violence. Services include psychosocial counselling, referral of GBV survivors, life-skills training, information and awareness-raising and recreational activities. These activities are complemented by community outreach activities, conducted through Rohingya volunteers, to ensure that the communities know about and can access the WGSS, and challenging harmful social norms associated with GBV. Community outreach will take place in camps 12 and 16 amongst refugee populations.
This report is 22 pages long. Read More...

Etude de Base en eau, Hygiene Assainissement et Nutrition

The centrally managed USAID / Washington WASHplus project, led by FHI360 with CARE USA and Winrock International, as key partners, creates and supports interventions that lead to improvements in Water, Hygiene and Sanitation. 'Sanitation and explores and encourages innovation in the WASH sector, including the integration of WASH into related sectors such as nutrition. The report is 66 pages long. Read More...

“Political Economy Analysis for food and nutrition security and community resilience, and analysis of conflicts affecting food, nutrition and income security in Harande program area” Integrated Report

The major findings of this twofold study firstly highlight peaceful as well as contentious coexistence between formal institutions put in place with decentralization and informal and customary institutions managing resources essential to food and nutrition security. Stemming from a centuries-old tradition based on the right of the first occupant, the paramount importance of lineage and family, strict intra-community differentiation of socio- professional categories both in the management of pastoral resources and fisheries in Delta flooded areas and farming in dry areas, these customary institutions are still greatly relevant and legitimate in the eyes of the different communities today. Conversely, these communities often find it difficult to grasp the legal principles and norms (State land domain, local communities’ responsibilities, local governance, the role of deconcentrated State officials etc.) supporting local governments’ role in resource management. Consequently, the implementation of the Harande Program should be guided by the socio-cultural specifities of the target areas and should take into account the customary conflict management mechanisms as well as those promoted by civil society organizations which are the most validated by populations in the region of Mopti. The report is 140 pages long. Read More...

Baseline Study of the Food for Peace Development Food Assistance Project in Mali Final

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Food for Peace (FFP) awarded a contract for a development food assistance project in Mali in fiscal year (FY) 2015 to CARE International. The Human Capital, Accountability and Resilience Advancing Nutrition Security, Diversified Livelihoods and Empowerment (HARANDE) Project is implemented by CARE and its partners: Save the Children; Helen Keller International; Yam Giribolo Tumo; Sahel-Eco; and the Research and Technical Applications Group. The goal of the HARANDE Project—which means food security in Peulh—is to provide access to sustainable food, nutrition, and income security for 310,855 vulnerable household members in four districts (Bandiagara, Douentza, Tenenkou, and Youwarou) of the Mopti region in Mali by 2020. FFP contracted ICF to conduct a baseline study of the HARANDE Project in 2016 as the first phase of a pre-post evaluation cycle. The second phase will include a final evaluation, inclusive of an endline survey, in approximately five years. The baseline study includes a representative population-based household survey to collect data for key FFP indicators and a qualitative study to add context, richness, and depth to the findings from the household survey. The report is 434 pages long. Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all