Inclusive Governance

Adversity and Opportunity: Gender Relations, Emergencies and Resilience in the Horn of Africa

The Gender in Emergencies (GiE) study contributes to this strategy development by examining how the HES can be implemented in the specific context of the Horn of Africa (HoA).2 Commissioned in early 2014 by CARE Australia, the study’s purpose is to ‘contribute to CARE International’s Gender in Emergencies learning and research agenda providing a comparative analysis of the opportunities and challenges in gender equality and women’s empowerment in emergency contexts, and provide lessons for future humanitarian responses.’ Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Cyclone Idai Response Sofala Province, Mozambique

On 14 March 2019, Tropical Cyclone Idai made landfall near Beira City, leaving devastating loss of life and large-scale destruction of assets and infrastructure. In the days that followed, entire villages were submerged as floodwaters rose causing mass displacement. From early on in the response it was clear that certain groups such as female headed-households (FHH), persons with disabilities (PwD), the elderly and children (boys and girls) were some of the most at risk, both in the immediate response and in recovery. This was further confirmed during this Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA).

CARE had identified four main districts in Sofala province in which to focus its assessment based on planned operational locations: Beira, Dondo (with a focus on Samora Machel), Nhamatanda (with a focus on Mutechira) and Buzi (with a focus on Guara Guara). The RGA was built up progressively over the data collection period, using 30 focus group discussions (FGDs), 14 key informant interviews (KII), 55 household surveys, and observations, in both rural and urban areas, transit, accommodation centres and with communities. Data collection took place between the 6 and15 April 2019. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Tropical Cyclone IDAI Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe was hit by Cyclone Idai between the 15th and 17th of March. The tropical storm caused riverine and flash flooding in the eastern and southern part of Zimbabwe resulting in loss of life, injury, destruction of livelihoods, houses, roads, bridges and other public infrastructures. An estimated 270 000 people have been affected by Cyclone Idai.

CARE conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis to identify and make recommendation to the different sectors in the response on how to meet the different needs of women, men, boys and girls during and after the emergence. Secondary and primary data was collected from the 1st to the 4th of April 2019. Field Visits and Focus group discussions were held in 4 of the affected areas, Chimanimani, Chipinge, Buhera and Mutare Rural District. Through consultations with the affected men, women, boys and girls, the team was able to identify both immediate and long term needs for the communities, families and the different groups.
Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender and GBV Assessment Borno State: Banki, Pulka and Rann

Rapid Gender and GBV assessments provide information about the different GBV risks, needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, boys and girls during crisis. The analysis is built up progressively using a range of primary and secondary information to understand gender roles and power relations and implied GBV risks and how they may change during a crisis. The analysis provides practical, programming and operational recommendations to meet the different needs of women, men, boys and girls, to ensure that humanitarian actors ‘do no harm’ in their operations. The global objective of this assessment is to improve the quality and effectiveness of CARE and partner’s response to the North East Nigeria crisis. Read More...

Mind the Gap Exploring the Gender Dynamics of CARE Rwanda’s Village Savings and Loans (VSL) Programming

This report documents the process, tools and key findings of a Gender Gap Analysis (GGA) carried out by CARE
Rwanda in late 2011 to explore how gender dynamics influence the process and outcomes of the VSL methodology
as a programming platform for women’s empowerment. The findings of the CARE Rwanda Gender Gap Analysis indicate that normative gender roles and inequitable power relations between men and women significantly constrain women’s ability to fully participate in and benefit from the VSL methodology. The specific objectives of the CARE Rwanda GGA were:

 To learn how gender norms shape women’s participation in and benefits from VSL groups;
 To understand the different experiences of men and women participating in VSL groups; and
 To formulate recommendations for strengthening the VSL methodology to address issues relating to gender
dynamics. Read More...

GenCAP/CARE Rapid Gender Analysis: Unity State, South Sudan

Women’s lives have only gotten worse following the political and inter-communal violence that has shaken South Sudan to its core since mid-December 2013i. Women have been raped and killed where they had sought shelter, including hospitals and churchesii. In April 2014, fighting in Unity State caused more than 20,000 people from throughout the state to seek refuge in Protection of Civilian centres in Bentiu: the biggest movement of people since the current crisis began. There has been relatively little analysis about the different needs of women, men, boys and girls during the current crisis in Unity.

Rapid gender analysis provides information about the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, boys and girls in a crisis by examining the relationships between women, men, boys and girls. For the moment, this is only an incomplete, initial analysis of gender relations in Bentiu PoC area. Nevertheless the initial gender analysis and recommendations for more gender sensitive programming should inform programming to make sure we meet the needs and protect women, men, boys and girls. Read More...

No Simple Solutions: Women, displacement and durable solutions in South Sudan

Conversations surrounding returns and relocations in South Sudan and the future of the POC sites are often framed around clear-cut distinctions between single push and pull factors. This framing – often based on the perceptions of international actors of what internally displaced people (IDPs) or refugees do or should think – ignores the fact that decisions to stay or to move are made based on complex motivations in contexts of high uncertainty and, especially for women, limited information. This report seeks to bring the perceptions and experiences of displaced and returned South Sudanese women to the forefront of conversations around durable solutions, and further convey the complexities of the current context. Read More...

INFORMALITY AND GENDER DYNAMICS IN TRIPOLI’S LABOR MARKET

Care International commissioned a study to examine the experiences of women and men, both Syrian and Lebanese, in Tripoli’s informal labor market. Informality constitutes a major component of the Tripolitan labor market. It is manifested in the form of informal employment as well as in neighborhoods in the form of informal housing. It is within this context that Syrian refugees settled in Tripoli, which, along its metropolitan area, hosted 6 percent of Lebanon’s Syrian refugees in 2015, i.e. around 70 000 registered refugees. 75 percent of refugees are located in Tripoli’s densely inhabited neighborhoods and the rest are located in the Bedawi neighborhood which also hosts a Palestinian Refugee camp (UN Habitat 2016). This form of settlement is accompanied by increased risk, and many - especially women - fall victim to various forms of violence. Amongst many places, this violence occurs at work, for both Syrian and Lebanese women. However, the former suffer an additional layer of violence emanating from racism due to their refugee status. Read More...

CARE RGA of Myanmar refugee crisis (2017)

Between 25 August and 10 October 2017, an estimated 521,000 refugees from Myanmar have crossed the border from Myanmar to Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh following communal conflict in the Rakhine state of Myanmar. The numbers are likely to increase as people continue to cross the border and additional groups of new arrivals are identified. As a humanitarian organization, CARE has a mandate to respond to emergencies and is well positioned to do so due to its history of emergency response in the country; a decade-long presence in the southeast region (including Cox’s Bazar) through food security, disaster risk reduction (DRR), emergency response and women’s empowerment programs; and established relationships with government stakeholders and NGOs.

The objectives of the rapid gender analysis (RGA) were to understand the unique needs, capacities and coping strategies of women, men, girls and boys among the newly arrived Myanmar refugees and, consequently, to formulate recommendations for action for the different sectors. Read More...

Latin America & Caribbean: Venezuelan Migrants & Refugees in Colombia

This Rapid Gender Analysis provides preliminary information and observations on the different needs, capacities and coping strategies of Venezuelan migrant and refugee women, men, boys, and girls in Colombia. It seeks to understand how gender roles and relations have changed as a result of the crisis and share recommendations for how the humanitarian community can more effectively consider these changing dynamics to better meet the different needs of women, men, boys and girls of different ages, abilities and other contextually relevant forms of diversity. Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all