Gender Equality

Post Project Sustainability Study Report: Berchi- Claiming Rights – Promoting Gender Equality: Women’s Empowerment and male engagement for gender transformation in post conflict and chronically food-insecure setting of Ethiopia” (2013-2015)

he project Berchi – “Be Strong!” in Amharic, fully named “Claiming Rights - Promoting Gender Equality: Women’s empowerment and male engagement for gender transformation in post-conflict and chronically food-insecure settings of Ethiopia” was an Austrian Development Agency (ADA)- and CARE Austria-funded project and was implemented during the period of 2013 to 2015. Its strategic objective was to empower chronically food insecure women so that they can achieve sustainable livelihood security in the Ebinat and Simada districts of South Gondar Zone within the Amhara Region of Ethiopia.

The purpose and scope of the study is to assess the impact and sustainability of these outcomes after the project has ended. These results are compared with outcomes from the end line evaluation. Furthermore, this study is tasked with assessing the extent to which the key project results and social norm changes have been sustained after the project was phased out. Read More...

IMPACT OF COV1D-19 ON WOMEN AND GIRLS IN ETHIOPIA

By August 9, 2021, Ethiopia had reported more than 284,000 COVID-19 cases and 4,426 deaths. Since COVID-19 was first reported in Ethiopia in March of 2021, the impacts of the pandemic, the measures taken to curb COVID-19, and additional political, economic, and environmental crises have severely impacted the population.

Women and girls bear different burdens in this crisis, and emergency responses often overlook the differences in impacts and needs for women, girls, men, and boys in humanitarian responses. To that end, this research— with funding from the EUTF (European Union Emergency Trust Fund) provides insight into the impact of COV1D-19 on women and girls in Ethiopia. This insight informs recommendations and guide EUTF partners and other relevant stakeholders in the areas of EUTF interventions. With this objective in mind, four woredas (administrative districts), one refugee camp, and one Industrial Park (IP) were considered as sample areas. These are Sekota Zuria and Gazgibla woredas in Wag Hemra zone of Amhara region; Moyale and Miyo woredas in Borena Zone of Oromia region, Asayita Refugee Camp in Afar region, and Bole-Lemi Industrial Park in Addis Ababa.

This research surveyed 372 women and girls in April 2021. The quantitative surveys covered adult women and girls over the age of 15. It also provides insights into the differences between refugees, Internally Displaced People (IDPs), refugees, and migrants. Qualitative from focus group discussions and key informant interviews also reflects opinions from men and boys. [75 pages] Read More...

Know and Grown Project

Cambodia is one of several countries that implemented a five-year program (increased to 6 years due to the COVID 19 pandemic) with the intention to impact 500,000 adolescents between 10-18 years, with a focus on girls. The Know and Grow (K&G) project was implemented by CARE Cambodia, funded by Patsy Collins Trust Fund Initiative (Cohort 3) with the overall objective of Attainment, Equality, Quality, and Empowerment for ethnic minority girls and boys living in Ratanak Kiri Province in northeast Cambodia. The K&G project’s intention was to empower 2,889 adolescents with a focus on 1,505 marginalised ethnic minority adolescent girls and boys. The K&G program aim was on innovation in learning and teaching so as to promote 21st century knowledge and skills among ethnic minority girls and boys so they would be ready to engage as Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) citizens when ASEAN integration occurred. CARE Cambodia has been implementing programs with ethnic minority communities and government partners in Ratanak Kiri Province for two decades. The K&G program team worked with the Provincial Office of Education (POE) staff, school directors, teachers and students from 11 lower secondary schools (Grades 7 to 11) to achieve the project objectives. [118 pages] Read More...

Cocoa Sustainability Initiative III

The Cocoa Sustainability Initiative phase 3 (CSI III) is a three-year partnership between General Mills Foundation and CARE International that will be implemented over the period December 2020 to November 2023. The project seeks to improve the food and nutrition security of over 3,500 cocoa farmers and their families in 20 communities in the Asikuma-Odoben-Brakwa District in the Central Region of Ghana by promoting sustainable agriculture, climate resilience, inclusive agriculture systems, women’s empowerment and improved nutrition practices. Building on the success of CSI phase I and II, CSI III addresses a range of interconnected issues, from low agricultural productivity and income to gender equality and voice to inclusive governance, child protection, nutrition and climate change resilience. The aim of the study was to provide baseline values for project indicators to help track the progress and impact of the project during and after implementation. Drawing on face-to-face interviews, a mixed method approach with critical gender lens was employed in data collection and analysis. Specifically, data were collected through a household survey (N=225) and Focus Group Discussions with men and women (N=10). A summary of key findings and recommendations are presented below. [71 pages] Read More...

Cost-efficiency analysis Conditional Cash for Education and Protection

This case study summarizes an analysis conducted by CARE using the Dioptra tool to generate cost-efficiency estimates for Conditional Cash for Education and Protection in Jordan. The analysis revealed that:
● Conditional Cash for Education and Protection cost $1,474 per child on average, across nine projects within the program portfolio.
● Tweaking the transfer size and frequency can affect cost-efficiency by more than 30 percent. It can free up funds to reach at least 40 percent more children with conditional cash, or allow existing recipient households to benefit from other economic resilience interventions.
● Providing awareness sessions on the importance of education is a small cost component of conditional cash that could be cost-effective.
● Different interventions are required for different groups of children. At minimum, the children receiving conditional cash should be differentiated by age: young (6-11) and old (12-16).
● Providing conditional cash for the full school year of at least 10 months is believed to be more effective and protective for children in need.
● Despite its effectiveness, cash incentives are unlikely to be a sustainable intervention to ensure children’s school attendance. It could benefit from other supporting interventions that address social barriers preventing children from attending school.
● Based on further assessments on different approaches and best practices, the program team intends to test a gradual reduction in transfer amounts for 10 months per year over 3 years, differentiated by age group, including livelihoods support for all recipient households, and referrals to Emergency Cash Assistance for highly vulnerable households.
Cost-efficiency estimates are cited for learning purposes only, and should not be used as the sole basis for future budgeting or benchmarking. All cost-efficiency estimates include Direct Project Costs, Direct Shared Costs, and Indirect Costs. Read More...

Every Voice Counts Programme

In 2020 after COVID 19 restrictions were relaxed, a CSC Meeting in October 2020 was organized at District Mirpurkhas and Umerkot with community and government departments to discuss gender related issues and to review and develop action plans regarding the inclusiveness of communities in government level decision making. It also worked on getting the District Gender Forums activated in Districts Mirpurkhas and Umerkot for effective district public authorities and community representatives, participation included local government, district administration, police, health and education department endorsed that they will continue this forum with the support of Social Welfare Department and other civil society organizations. The civil society organization showed their interest to continue Gender Forum activities in Mirpurkhas and Umerkot against Child Marriages and Domestic Violence.

Two trainings of Union Council Secretaries of both Districts have been conducted during this reporting month, on the Sindh Child Marriage Restraint Act 2013, the mandate of the local government department and the role of the union council secretaries to register marriages, births, nikkahs and nikkah registrar and pundits as per the laws. More than 90 union council secretaries of both district actively participated in the trainings. Regional Director and Additional Directors of Umerkot and Mirpurkhas concluded the training and distributed the certificates among the participants in a closing ceremony. [13 pages] Read More...

HYGIENE AND BEHAVIOR CHANGE COALITION (HBCC) PROJECT END-LINE EVALUATION

The Covid-19 pandemic remains a global concern, it has affected all social-economic spheres of life around the world. People have and continue to lose life. The global economies continue to decline. Countries and the development partners continue to spread millions of dollars in educating people on dangers, control and prevention of the Covid-19 pandemic. Multiple barriers can affect efforts to minimize transmission and harmful impacts of health emergencies; this is not different for COVID-19. The barriers vary from inadequate knowledge at individual and community levels and limited access to hygiene/WASH facilities among others. With such limitations, the risk of contracting Covid-19 increases. As part of Rwanda’s Covid-19 response plan, CARE Rwanda designed and implemented HBCC project over the period of 1 year (July 2020-July 2021). (54 pages) Read More...

A Baseline Study and Social Norms Analysis using SNAP for the project BERHAN: Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights Initiative in Amhara Region, Ethiopia

Background: BERHAN – Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights initiative in Amhara region of Ethiopia seeks to support women and girls in Fogera and Estie woredas to safely exercise their sexual and reproductive health rights, leading to improved wellbeing (impact).

Objective: The purpose of this study was to understand the social norms that are associated with the practices of female genital cutting (FGC) and early marriage (EM), and to establish a baseline for all project indicators.

The quantitative survey was conducted on a randomly selected sample of 375 respondents comprising of men, women, girls, and boys (adults and adolescents). Quantitative data were collected using an interviewer administered structured questionnaire. Qualitative data were collected by masters and PhD degree holders, and quantitative data were collected by trained and experienced BSC level data collectors.

Results: The results revealed that FGC and EM were common practices in the community with a prevalence of 85.0% and 64.0% respectively. The community held the practices because of various reasons among which are cultural preservation and lack of knowledge. The community members were highly influenced by the sanctions that made them change their initial positions. Generally, women could not use contraceptive methods without permission from their partners or family members and this applies to all modern contraceptive methods.Only 3.7% of girls and women in the age group of 15-49 were able to use a modern contraceptive of their choice and, only 30.5% were able to decide on their own reproductive health care use. Read More...

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE GENDERED EFFECTS OF THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC ON HOUSEHOLDS

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is arguably one of the biggest pandemics to hit the world in recent times. It began in Wuhan, China and within a span of a few months took a toll on all the countries. A pandemic of such magnitude was witnessed when the 1918 flue pandemic started in Europe, spreading to United States of America, Asia and later to the rest of the world. Globally, the pandemic has affected the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Governments across the world, including Kenya, have taken up different containment measures including introduction of economic stimulus programs to cushion women and men, girls and boys and the economy at large, from the devastating effects of the pandemic. In Kenya, the pandemic and its associated containment measures resulted in unprecedented effects on the country’s economic and social outcomes such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and people’s well-being with a disproportionate burden falling on women and girls. This report analyses the gendered socio-economic effects of COVID-19 and provides policy recommendations that will guide responses, interventions and recovery plans for COVID-19 in Kenya. Specifically, the report assesses the effect of COVID-19 on: incomes including remittances; food security; education; unpaid care and domestic work; access to healthcare services; access to sexual and reproductive health services; access to social protection; access to water and sanitation services; gender-based violence (GBV) due to restrictions associated with COVID-19, and the prevention and response mechanisms. The analysis in this report is informed by primary data collected from a sample of 2,587 individuals from all the 47 counties in Kenya between 4th August and 8th September 2020 using Computer Assisted Telephonic Interviews (CATI). Due to the sensitivity of GBV information and the need to uphold the privacy of respondents in the survey, a separate SMS-based survey was conducted. Two questionnaires were administered to a sample of 2,482 individuals drawn across all the 47 counties in Kenya. The same individuals were interviewed at different times with the duration of each interview lasting not longer than 20 minutes. A total of 34 Key Informant Interviews (KIIs), that is 19 women and 15 men, were conducted from both State and non-State actors to complement and triangulate the findings from the individual/ household data while drawing more insights on the effects and recovery plans from the pandemic. Read More...

Rapid Gender Analysis Sofala – Beira

On the 23rd of January 2021 Tropical Cyclone Eloise made its landfall, in central Mozambique.. Over 441,686 people were affected, with 43,327 persons being displaced (the Instituto Nacional de Gestão Reduçãodo Risco de Desastres (INGD).) The storm also destroyed farmland, infrastructure and thousands of homes. Most of the areas hit by Cyclone Eloise were the same areas affected by Cyclone Idai less than two years ago and hit by tropical storm Chalane on 30 December 2020. CARE conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis from the 12th to the 18th of February in three of the affected districts in Sofala Province, Beira (with the focus on Inhamizua, IFAPA accommodation center, and Chipangara) Nhamatanda (with focus on Tica, and Jhon Segredo Accommodation center), and Buzi (with focus on Guara-Guara), at the transit centers, resettlement sites, and catchment areas. About 56 364 houses were totally or partially destroyed, others flooded, forcing some families to shelter with host families. Others families had been evacuated from flooded areas and were staying in crowded temporary accommodation. Those that were staying in accommodation centers had lost most of their resources, and were dependent on government for daily provision. Read More...

Filter Evaluations

Clear all