Gender Equality

Fiji Gender, Disability & Inclusion Snapshot COVID-19, TC Yasa and TC Ana

Fiji is facing unprecedented challenges as a result of the compounded effects of COVID-19, Tropical Cyclone (TC) Yasa and TC Ana. TC Yasa was a category five cyclone with winds up to 345 kilometers per hour which made landfall over Fiji’s second largest island, Vanua Levu on 17 December 2020. TC Yasa was not the only major cyclone in 2020 as TC Harold had hit Viti Levu and the islands to the east as a Category Four cyclone on 8 April 2020. In the midst of response and recovery efforts for these cyclones, coupled with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, Fiji was hit again by another tropical cyclone, TC Ana, on 31 January 2021. Read More...

MAGNIFYING INEQUALITIES AND COMPOUNDING RISKS The Impact of COVID-19 on the Health and Protection of Women and Girls on the Move

More than one year into the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic—with some countries seemingly on their way out of the crisis while others enter new waves—evidence of its impact is growing. COVID-19 is increasing short-term humanitarian needs and negatively affecting longer-term outcomes for marginalized populations and people in vulnerable situations, significantly setting back hard-won development gains, magnifying inequalities, and compounding risks. Among those worst affected are the more than 80 million people worldwide—approximately half of whom are women and girls—who have been forcibly displaced by drivers such as persecution, conflict, generalized violence or human rights violations.1
The majority of forcibly displaced people live in resource-poor countries with weak public health and social protection systems, and economies that have been hard-hit by the pandemic.2 Yet, to date, there has only been limited research around the unique ways in which women and girls on the move are affected.3 This despite predictions of significant impacts on access to, and use of, basic health services—including for sexual and reproductive health (SRH)—and the overall protection environment, including increases in prevalence and risk of gender-based violence (GBV).
Placing gender at the center of its humanitarian and development responses, CARE undertook new research in Afghanistan, Ecuador, and Turkey between April and May 2021 to better understand how COVID-19 is impacting the health and protection of women and girls on the move. The three countries represent different types of forced displacement across multiple regions: internally displaced persons (IDPs) and refugee returnees in Afghanistan; more recent migrants and refugees due to the Venezuelan crisis in Ecuador; and longer-term Syrian refugees living under temporary international protection in Turkey. The primary data collected for this research included more than 1,000 surveys with women on the move and from host communities, to allow comparison; 31 focus group discussions (FGDs) with women and adolescent girls; and 45 key informant interviews (KIIs) with government actors, health and protection service providers, humanitarian organizations, and CARE staff. Read More...

Promoting Economic Resilience of Syrian Women (PERSEVERE) Annual Project Results Report (April 2020 – March 2021)

“Promoting Economic Resilience of Syrian Women” (PERSEVERE, CAD$8,497,675) is undertaken with the financial support from the Government of Canada, provided through Global Affairs Canada. It aims to enhance the resilience of displaced and conflict-affected Syrian women, including women with disabilities. Led by CARE Canada and implemented by the Syria Resilience Consortium (SRC), CARE, and Humanity & Inclusion (HI), PERSEVERE is designed to contribute to this goal through the following Intermediate Outcomes:
1) Women, including young and older women as well as women with disabilities, participate more actively in community economic governance; and
2) Community members, institutions, and response actors actively support the inclusion of Gender, Age and Disability (GAD) consideration in economic governance. Initial project learning and methods are meant to be shared across the whole of Syria and other SRC members and introduced to wider response actors contributing to resilience.
This year, the program has been continuing to support inclusion of women and persons with disabilities in livelihood activities. More women have been provided with in-depth training to support other women to expand and grow their businesses. Read More...

Bersama Menuju Keadilan (BUKA) or Towards Fairness Together SELF-EVALUATION REPORT

Bersama Menuju Keadilan (BUKA) or Towards Fairness Together is a Yayasan Care Peduli (CARE) project which was implemented in West Java from July 2018 to October 2020.1 The project was implemented in Sukabumi and Bandung districts and was implemented by CARE and the Trade Union Rights Center (TURC). The project partnered with 7 trade unions in 21 factories across the two districts.
The goal of the project was to improve working conditions in garment factories in West Java through evidence-based negotiation and collective bargaining between unions and factory management using publicly available data. The project aimed to improve the capabilities of women garment workers and their unions to collect, analyse and use publicly available data in negotiation and collective bargaining with factories, resulting in particular in more gender-responsive Collective Bargaining Agreements (CBA). The project was designed on the assumption that publicly-available data could be used as the basis for evidence-based negotiation and bargaining between unions and factories, and that this form of evidence-based bargaining based on public data would lead to more successful bargaining and improved working conditions. The project also aimed to ensure that the evidence-base, data and lessons learned from the project became accessible to the wider labour movement and civil society in Indonesia.
An emphasis on gender justice was mainstreamed within the project objective, outcomes and activities. Women constitute the majority of the garment sector workforce in Indonesia and they are disproportionately impacted by worker’s rights abuses and face differential impacts on the basis of their gender. Women are also inadequately represented within union leadership and in collective bargaining, resulting in their voices and experiences not being reflected in the outcomes of bargaining. The project prioritised building the capabilities of women union members in particular on data and bargaining skills, encouraging the presence of women within negotiation and bargaining teams, developing a peer network of women leaders, strengthening union understanding and identification of the disproportionate and differentiated impacts of poor working conditions on women, and supporting the agreement of CBAs which are more responsive to those realities. Read More...

Response to the Influx of refugees and returnees from Nigeria in Diffa Region

Les refugiés et les retournés sont arrivés au Niger par vagues de 20 à 30 personnes selon les moyens de transport disponibles. Généralement le départ de la zone d’origine est précipité du fait d’une explosion de violence avec des attaques meurtrières, des incendies de villages entiers et des exactions. Une fois sortis des zones de violence ouverte, les 1ers regroupements se font dans des auto-gares formelles ou informelles. Certaines familles passent des jours et des nuits cachées dans la brousse, privées de nourriture et d’eau avant de trouver un moyen de transport. C’est généralement à l’arrivée sur les 1ers sites de destination qu’on commence à rechercher sur-place, des parents ou des connaissances susceptibles d’offrir un hébergement. Certaines personnes déplacées ne trouvent pas immédiatement leurs parents ou leurs connaissances et passent des jours et des nuits d’incertitude dans les autos gares. Les familles d’accueil sont généralement le premier soutien aux retournés et refugiés. Aucun accueil ou appui des acteurs humanitaires ou du gouvernement n’est disponible dès les 1ers jours d’arrivée des personnes déplacées. Ce sont donc les familles d’accueil qui offrent abris, vêtements, couchettes/nattes, nourriture et 1ers soins. Les premiers moments de détresse passés, les personnes déplacées cherchent une maison à louer ou en prêt selon leurs moyens. Cette situation fait qu’il y a des refugiés et retournés qui sont soit dans des familles d’accueil, soit relogés dans des maisons prêtées soit relogés dans des maisons louées.
Report #1 is 6 pages long.
Report #2 is 11 pages long. Read More...

WAYREP Baseline Report


WAYREP’s overall objective is to “Strengthen the resilience of refugee and Ugandan women, girls and youth to live a life free from violence (LFFV) in Uganda”. WAYREP focuses on women and girls’ empowerment within the context of some of Uganda’s most pressing current challenges such as rapid urbanization, regular and high rates of displacement and migration across and within Uganda’s borders and a very young and largely unemployed population. In 2020, this fragile context was further exacerbated with the outbreak of the Coronavirus pandemic (COVID 19) not only in terms of its health implications, but also in terms of its impact on livelihoods, safety and security. WAYREP is built on the hypothesis that Gender Based Violence (GBV) has two main drivers: gender inequality and poverty. This is exacerbated by displacement whether as a refugee or as an urban dweller coming from rural Uganda. WAYREP’s theory of change therefore states that: if refugee and vulnerable Ugandan women and girls have access to dignified livelihood opportunities, and if the gender, social and cultural norms that perpetuate GBV are challenged and minimized, then the likelihood of resorting to negative coping mechanisms - including GBV like early and forced marriage or commercial sex - will significantly reduce and women and girls’ self- reliance will increase.
The project seeks to achieve four result areas namely;
1. Enhanced sustainable and dignified livelihood for women and youth
2. Reduction of the acceptance of GBV
3. Enhanced psychosocial support to survivors of GBV
4. Increased accountability of the Government of Uganda (GoU) on the implementation of relevant
frameworks for women and girls’ protection and rights
The project is being implemented in Gulu Municipality (Pece and Bardege Divisions), Arua Municipality (River Oli Division, Omugo Settlement zones 4, 5, and 6) and Omugo Sub-county (in Obi, Angazi, Anufira, Duku, Boora and Ndapi Parishes).
This report is 81 pages long. Read More...

Final Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation of Women Smallholders and Cotton Producers from Vidarbha Region, Maharashtra

CARE India’s project on “Environmentally Sound and Climate Resilient Cotton Production Practices (ESCRCPP)”, supported by Group Galeries Lafayette, was implemented from 2018 to 2021 in 10 villages of Jalgaon Jamod block of Buldhana district in Vidarbha region of Maharashtra, aimed to promote environmentally sound, climate-resilient and inclusive cotton production. The location of the project was guided by the fact that Vidarbha accounts for half of the cotton area of Maharashtra, which has one third of cotton growing area in India and Buldhana district is the major cotton producing area in Vidarbha. The cotton based agricultural economy of the region faces challenges like water stress, climate variability and issues related to farming practices and technology. These result in low productivity, frequent crop failure, poor management of water resources, and high indebtedness of farmers.
The project had three purposes (sub-objectives or outcomes) and six expected results (outputs). The outcomes were: women small holders have the capacity to engage in environmentally sound and climate-resilient cotton production; strengthened collectives for building solidarity, promoting gender equity, and facilitating access of women smallholders from poor and vulnerable households to resilience building resources, services, and opportunities; and enabling environment in the form of supportive cotton value chain actors.
This report is 82 pages long. Read More...

External ex-post evaluation of the “Multi-sectoral Protection Response for Vulnerable Populations in Ecuador affected by the Humanitarian Crisis” Project executed by CARE, Alas de Colibrí Foundation and Diálogo Diverso between 2019 and 2020

To respond to the migration crisis CARE Ecuador (CARE), Diálogo Diverso (DD) and Alas de Colibrí Fundation (ACF) associated to implement, with funding from the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) of the U.S. Department of State (that finances assistance actions for vulnerable refugee and migrant populations around the world), the “Multi-sectoral Protection Response for Vulnerable Populations in Ecuador affected by the Humanitarian Crisis” Project (PRM Project), from September 1, 2019 through August 31, 2020. The Project aimed at improving health and physical and psychological well-being of the forced-to-migrate Venezuelan population (and other nationalities), both migrants and refugees; as well as of the vulnerable local population, particularly LGBTIQ+ individuals and women survivors of gender-based violence, through a multi-sectoral intervention that includes: health care, legal and psychosocial advice, shelter, and comprehensive support interventions for the migrant humanitarian crisis. The project also generated advocacy actions to strengthen the capacities of public officials and institutions related to migratory processes, and to promote the restitution of migrants and refugees’ rights.
This report is 78 pages long. Read More...

Tigray Rapid Gender Analysis

The Tigray conflict that began in November 2020 has culminated in widespread displacement of people, with some villages completely emptied. The conflict has resulted in the death of thousands of people as well as the displacement of over 417,152 people predominantly women and children. 4.5million people in Tigray are in need of humanitarian assistance. The conflict has also paralyzed the health system and most infrastructure. All of this comes in a context where Ethiopia is facing over 185,641 COVID-19 cases as of March 20, 2021, decreased food production because of a locust infestation, and a year of school closures due to COVID-19.

This Rapid Gender Analysis draws from focus group discussions and individual and key informant interviews with 94 people (67% of whom are women), secondary data sources, and CARE’s research in the region to understand the specific challenges people of all genders are facing. The RGA was conducted in the Northern Amhara region at sites for internally displaced people (IDPs) in Debark and MayTsebri (Formerly under Tigray region). Read More...

Final Evaluation of the Regional Project: Men and Boys as Partners in Promoting Gender Equality and the Prevention of Youth Extremism and Violence in the Balkans – Young Men Initiative – YMI II

The Men and Boys as Partners in Promoting Gender Equality and prevention of Youth Extremism and Violence in the Balkans or Young Men Initiative II (YMI II) project was set to enable positive and peaceful societies for young people in Serbia, Kosovo , Albania and Bosnia and Herzegovina, that support gender equality and decrease interpersonal violence and its extremism. The project builds on the efforts dating from 2007 when YMI started to encourage gender-equitable attitudes and behaviors amongst young men, to decrease violence against (young) women and peer violence in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, and Serbia. YMI II project started on October 1, 2017 and ended on December 31, 2020.
The evaluation addressed the whole implementation period, all four target countries and main target and beneficiary groups – representatives of partner organizations, teachers, youth, movement leaders and governments. With the purpose to assess results achieved based on OECD-DAC evaluation criteria, the evaluation focused on relevance, impact, and sustainability of project activities – in relation to the expected results, outcome and outputs, as well as on key learning on approaches to inform future programming.
This report is 55 pages long. Read More...

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