Gender Equality

Stand Up, Speak Out: Breaking the silence around gender based violence among ethnic minority communities in Northern Vietnam

Violence against women is a global issue. Eliminating violence is one of the key priorities for countries worked to promote gender equality. The National study on violence against women in Vietnam in 2010 and 20191 showed that most violence against women is perpetrated by husbands/partners or acquaintances. Most cases are unreported to the authorities. Gender inequality is both an underlying cause and a consequence of violence against women – gender inequality is more common where women are undervalued compared to men and still experienced violence, which hampers women's empowerment.
The Vietnamese Government has implemented numerous programs and action plans on preventing and responding to gender based violence (GBV)/domestic violence,and has supported civil society organizations (CSOs) in implementing intervention projects on GBV. In such a general context, with the support of the European Union, the SUSO project implemented by CARE International in Vietnam and Light has been carried out in 4 communes: Muong Phang, Pa Khoang, Thanh Nua and Hua Thanh of Dien Bien province, which is a poor province in the socio-economic region with the highest density of poor population (MOLISA and other organizations, 2018), from March 2018 to January 2022, with the goal of breaking the silence around GBV among ethnic minority communities in Northern Vietnam.
This final evaluation report aims to assess the project’s impacts/outcomes and key lessons learned using the OECD/DAC criteria as the guideline. Read More...

Conflict Sensitive Rapid Gender Analysis Cabo Delgado, Mozambique

The on-going armed insurgency in Cabo Delgado that started in 2017 and the mass displacement it caused have created a complex humanitarian crisis in one of Mozambique’s poorest regions, Cabo Delgado. Prior to the crisis, Cabo Delgado province already suffered from high levels of poverty and absence of services. This situation has been worsened by the crisis which depleted what little resilience the province’s population had. Host communities find themselves having to share already scarce resources. There are evident signs of solidarity fatigue and tensions between IDPs and host communities result in frequent conflicts.

IDPs in Cabo Delgado are suffering from dire living conditions, extremely limited access to basic services and struggling to meet essential needs. Widespread lack of access to cash and income generating opportunities are causing negative multi-layered gendered impacts on the lives of IDPs. IDPs living in resettlement centres are among
those most vulnerable, women and children making up the majority of residents, where access to resources or income generating opportunities is very limited. Female-headed IDP households have constrained access to land when compared to their male counterparts, making subsistence farming difficult. The combination of these factors
has led to the commodification of humanitarian aid with the sale of part of the food received through humanitarian assistance being a prevalent practice.

While humanitarian assistance has been vital in meeting IDPs’ most urgent needs, there are still immense and persistent needs. Life at resettlement centres is difficult and protection risks abound, particularly for women and girls. Water is scarce and fetching it is an arduous and often dangerous task for women and girls. Access to health care is
limited, including to maternal and sexual and reproductive health services. Reports of sexual exploitation and abuse were frequent and included cases of community leaders requesting money or sex in exchange for guaranteed access to humanitarian aid. Read More...

RAPPORT D’ANALYSE SITUATIONNELLE, CARTOGRAPHIE SOCIALE ET ANALYSE DU POVOIR SUR COVID-19 DANS LA ZONE DE SANTE DE KATWA

Une de composante de ce projet de prévention contre la propagation de la pandémie COVID-19 dans la zone de santé de Katwa, consiste à conduire une analyse situationnelle plus approfondie dans les aires de santé ciblées par le projet dans le but de pouvoir déterminer les connaissances, les perceptions, les attitudes et les pratiques des membres de la communauté y compris des partenaires étatiques vis de la pandémie elle-même et de ses mesures de prévention. Par conséquent, l’exercice consiste à ouvrir des débats sur la Covid-19 et d’autres épidémies, à faire prendre conscience du problème et à amorcer le dialogue entre les principales parties intéressées à différents niveaux pour des stratégies de lutte plus appropriées.
La réalisation de cet exercice a comporté quatre (4) moments clés à savoir :
1. Atelier d’analyse situationnelle, cartographie sociale et analyse du pouvoir avec les acteurs clés
2. Enrichissement et collecte des données de l’atelier à travers des Focus groups dans les 9 Aires de santé
3. La phase d’analyse, compilation et rédaction du rapport (première version) des données
4. Restitution, capitalisation des amendements et des résultats de l’analyse.
Ce rapport relate le cheminement méthodologique et les résultats synthèse des travaux réalisés, ils seront ensuite complétés lors de l’atelier de restitution par les résultats complets des focus groups réalisés au sein de la communauté bénéficiaire dans la ZS de Katwa. Read More...

Localization in Practice: Realities from Women’s Rights and Women-Led Organizations in Poland

During the invasion of eastern Ukraine in 2014, violence against women and girls, especially intimate partner violence and sexual violence, increased rapidly. Since February 2022, the situation has deteriorated to alarming new levels. Exacerbated and pervasive violence against Ukrainian women and girls is a consequence of war, with women and girls continuing to be abused, exploited, and raped in Ukraine and while they flee to other countries. An increasing number of survivors are coming forward, buttressed by additional reports from women’s rights activists, service providers, humanitarian organizations, and UN agencies. As conflict in Ukraine pushes millions of women to seek refuge abroad, those leaving remain highly vulnerable to risks like trafficking, or may face sexual exploitation and abuse when seeking access to accommodation, transportation, or financial resources.

Women’s organizations in Poland, particularly those providing services to survivors of violence and working on women’s rights, are reporting more and more requests for assistance from sexual violence survivors inside Ukraine. Polish civil society has demonstrated their commitment and fitness to respond to the growing humanitarian needs, but the international community must step up with financial and technical support to ensure that a sustainable, localized approach can continue. Read More...

Ukraine Rapid Gender Analysis (Primary Data) May 2022

"It is no longer very scary whether a rocket will arrive or not from the sea, but it is scary that we will die of starvation.”
The lives of people across Ukraine have been profoundly impacted by the humanitarian crisis brought on by the invasion on 24 February 2022. As of 29 April, 5.5 million refugees have already fled Ukraine,1 and the number of internally displaced people (IDPs) has reached 7.7 million. Of those who have fled the country, it is estimated that 90 per cent are women and children, while most men aged 18–60 are required to stay behind under martial law. Based on current data from the International Organization for Migration, 60 per cent of the adult internally displaced population are female, while 40 per cent are male. As the crisis quickly evolves, so do the needs and priorities of women and men across Ukraine.
This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA), carried out by UN Women and CARE International, seeks to draw attention to the gender dynamics in the humanitarian crisis resulting from the war in Ukraine. The RGA also proposes recommendations for humanitarian leadership, actors and donors to ensure consideration of the gendered dimensions of risk, vulnerability and capabilities in response to this crisis.
The RGA is a progressive publication based on both primary and secondary data sources that compares pre-crisis data with up-to-date information as the situation evolves. This RGA builds upon the RGA Ukraine Brief (http://www.careevaluations.org/evaluation/rapid-gender-analysis-ukraine/) developed by CARE International during the first week of the war and on the UN Women and CARE RGA published 29 March6 based on an analysis of secondary data. For this report, the RGA team reviewed English, Ukrainian and Russian sources and interviewed 179
women and men from local communities across Ukraine, as well as representatives from civil society organizations (CSOs), UN agencies and government bodies. Particular effort was made to ensure that the voices of women and men in vulnerable situations and from different marginalized groups were included. Read More...

Gender Analysis of CARE Ethiopia-Resilience in Pastoral Areas Activity (RiPA) North Project

The purpose of the gender analysis is to provide information on gender-related rights in pastoral context and unpacks issues, factors and reasons on how gender relations will affect the achievement of the RiPA goals. Moreover, it also aims at identifying the key and existing discriminatory social and gender norms that are relevant to and responsible for perpetuating gender inequality in the pastoral and agro-pastoral communities in the targeted Regions and Woredas. To achieve this, CARE’s gender analysis framework called the ‘Good Practices Framework’ was used. The study was conducted in Somali, Afar and Oromia. Eight Woredas were selected from the 3 regions namely: Shabelle, Kebrebeya, Erer and Afdem from Somali region; Gewane and Afambo from the Afar region, and Babille and Meiso from the Oromia region. The survey, 40 KIIs and 56 FGDs data collection techniques were used to collect data from the targeted groups. A total of 402 (325 female and 77 male) participants took part in the survey. Read More...

Recipe for Response: What We Know About the Next Global Food Crisis, and How to Fight it

The genesis of the present hunger crisis goes back farther than February 2022 and is due to a combination of global and localized factors. Globally, climate change has compromised agricultural livelihoods and led to displacement, especially in regions like the Horn of Africa and Central America’s Dry Corridor, where famers struggle to produce yields that meet the needs of local markets. The global economic fallouts associated with COVID-19, and inadequate social safety nets, have led to record unemployment and growing poverty—especially for women and women-led households (UN Women 2021)—so that even where food is available, high prices put basic items out of reach for many. Armed conflict is also driving food insecurity, for example by making it difficult for farmers to cultivate their lands, or damaging or disrupting vital agricultural infrastructure—such as transportation, storage and distribution sites—and reducing access to markets and assistance.
Women and girls are disproportionately impacted by food insecurity and related shocks. Gender norms and roles mean that women are often responsible for their households’ food security, including shopping for and preparing food, yet they might also be the ones to eat “last and least” in their household. Women are also more likely to be excluded from decision-making when it comes
to addressing hunger in their communities (CARE 2020). These types of gendered imbalances hurt entire communities: in a 2021 assessment in Sudan, CARE found that 82% of people living in female-headed households reported recently skipping a meal, compared with 56% of people living in male-headed households. Read More...

Assessment on “Improving lives of Rohingya refugees and host community members in Bangladesh through sexual and reproductive healthcare integrated with gender-based violence prevention and response”

In response to the health and protection needs of the Rohingya refugees and the host communities in Cox´s Bazar, CARE is implementing the project “Improving lives of Rohingya refugees and host community members in Bangladesh through sexual and reproductive healthcare integrated with gender-based violence prevention and response” with funding support by German Federal Foreign Office. This is a two year project targeting Rohingya refuges of camp 11, 12, 15 and 16 and vulnerable host communities of Jaliapalong union for GBV and SRH services.

Indicator 1: %of targeted refugee and host community report an improved environment for women and girls following the implementation of SRH and GBV prevention measures
i. 93% respondents have good and very good understanding on available SRH service
ii. Proportion of women who make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations, contraceptive use and reproductive health care. 17% of interviewed women can make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations, contraceptive use and reproductive health care.
iii. 32% of interviewed female from both host community and refugee community received both Anti-natal Care (ANC) and Post Natal Care (PNC).
So, we can say that, 47% (average of result of three proxy indicator) of targeted refugee and host community report an improved environment for women and girls following the implementation of SRH prevention measures.
iv. 49% of women and girls reporting feeling safe following the implementation of GBV prevention measures
v. 63% respondents (male 21`% and female 42%) go to community leaders for seeking help when they face any form of violence both in their home and also outside of their home
Here, “56% of targeted refugee and host community report an improved environment for women and girls following the implementation of GBV prevention”
Considering the average result of above GBV and SRH indicators, we can say that, 51.5% of targeted refugee and host community reported an improved environment for women and girls on SRH and GBV prevention measures at the baseline of the project.
Indicator 2: # of people (m/f) accessing services and information on SRH services and GBV prevention and response
Indicator 3: % of refugees and host population who report satisfaction with GBV and SRH assistance
i. 70% respondents from refugee and host community reported full satisfaction with GBV assistance
ii. 87% female and 65% male from refugee and host community reported full satisfaction with SRH assistance. (Among them 67% female from refugee and 20% female from host community, 45% male from refugee community and 20% male from host community)
Indicator 4: % of staff members with improved knowledge on SHR and GBV
Inicator 5: 45% of men and boys who report rejecting intimate partner violence and domestic violence
80% of staff members with improved knowledge on SHR and GBV
Indicator 5: # of women and adolescent girls having received MHM kit
i. Most of the respondents (85%) use reusable clothes
ii. 90% respondents wash and use the cloth again
Read More...

STRENGTHENING WOMEN AND YOUTH AT RISK OF GENDER BASED VIOLENCE Challenges and opportunities for enhancing resilience, with a focus on urban contexts and adolescent girls

This learning brief documents challenges, capacities and opportunities of women and youth at risk of gender based violence (GBV), in particular in urban areas in Northern Uganda. It summarizes key findings from various studies of the Women and Youth Resilience Project (WAYREP), including two Rapid Gender Analyses, the baseline, knowledge model papers, and a qualitative assessment.
The learning brief informs WAYREP’s learning agenda which aims at:
 Gaining a better understanding of the livelihood and safety, security, and wellbeing challenges that marginalised and vulnerable communities face in urban poor and settlement settings with a focus on girls,
 Identifying and documenting effective and sustainable support strategies to alleviate challenges, namely poverty and gender-based violence (GBV), in the nexus, urban and COVID 19 context.
WAYREP’s overall objective is to “Strengthen the resilience of refugee and Ugandan women, girls and youth to live a life free from violence in Uganda”. WAYREP focuses on women and girls’ empowerment within the context of some of Uganda’s most pressing current challenges such as rapid urbanization, regular and high rates of displacement and migration across and within Uganda’s borders and a very young and largely unemployed population. In 2020, this fragile context was further exacerbated with the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic not only in terms of its health implications, but also in terms of its impact on livelihoods, safety and security. Read More...

Evaluación final Proyecto Alma Llanera I

La presente evaluación es elaborada con el objetivo de valorar la implementación del PROYECTO “ALMA LLANERA”, el cual ha sido ejecutado por CARE Perú.
Para el desarrollo del estudio se implementó una metodología mixta basada en la aplicación de técnicas e instrumentos de tipo cuantitativo y cualitativo. El ámbito geográfico del estudio de base comprende las zonas donde intervino el proyecto, las cuales comprende los departamentos de Tumbes, Piura, La Libertad, Lima y la provincia constitucional del Callao.
Las principales variables analizadas se corresponden con las características básicas del público objetivo (características personales de las beneficiarias, de sus hogares, acceso a servicios de protección y afectación por el COVID-19), la cobertura, la pertinencia del proyecto, la eficacia y el impacto del Proyecto en función a los cambios esperados de su estrategia de intervención (plasmados a través de sus indicadores de impacto y resultados).
Estas variables se analizaron en la población objetivo del proyecto. Los informantes que proporcionaron la información requerida para el estudio fueron principalmente la población migrante y refugiada atendida, trabajadores/as y promotores de salud, funcionarios/as públicos y privados de las entidades públicas locales y el equipo técnico del Proyecto.
En este grupo de informantes se aplicaron encuestas a población migrante y refugiada atendida por el Proyecto, encuestas a trabajadores/as y promotores de salud y se complementó con entrevistas a funcionarios públicos y privados de los Centros de Salud Mental (CSMC), ONG, Asociaciones de Migrantes/Refugiados y Promotores de la Integración. Para el recojo de información, se diseñó un total de 10 formatos de recojo de información primaria, los cuales fueron aplicados durante los meses de octubre y noviembre del 2021, con algunas limitaciones propias de una aplicación por teléfono (llamadas no contestadas, servicios suspendidos, números equivocados) y otras referentes a la disponibilidad del informante (rechazo directo, falta de tiempo).
Como resultado de lo anterior se presentan los siguientes hallazgos: Read More...

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