Gender Equality

WOMEN’S VOICE AND LEADERSHIP (WVL) KENYA Project Baseline

This report presents a synthesis of findings from the baseline evaluation carried out for the Women’s Voice and Leadership program in Kenya. This program is funded by Global Affairs Canada (GAC) and is being delivered by CARE Canada, CARE Kenya, Uraia Trust, The Centre for Rights Education and Awareness (CREAW), Community Advocacy and Awareness (CRAWN Trust) and Urgent Action Fund (UAF- Africa). The program’s goal is to support the capacity and activities of local and national women’s organizations and movements seeking to empower women and girls, advance the protection of women’s and girls’ rights, and achieve gender equality with the ultimate outcome being the “increased enjoyment of human rights by women and girls and the enjoyment of gender equality in Kenya”. The overall objectives of the baseline were to provide: 1) the baseline data for the WVL Kenya project indicators against which progress will be measured, and 2) provide recommendations on improving the current project Performance Measurement Framework (PMF) and Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) Plan.
The baseline employed a mixed methodology approach, combining both quantitative and qualitative approaches. The study was undertaken in a feasible manner given the COVID 19 reality and associated safety precautions, limitations on movement and convening. The study findings drew analysis from secondary data, self-assessment questionnaires, key informant interviews and quantitative interviews through phone calls. The study engaged a wide range of stakeholders including: women’s rights organizations (WROs), women rights’ network members, staff of the 4 partner organizations and CARE staff. All the network members engaged were female as well as 83% of representatives of WROs and partners. Slightly above half (53%) of WROs representatives engaged were organization leaders while 86% of partner representatives were staff. Read More...

Our Best Shot: Frontline Health Workers and COVID-19 Vaccines

Fully realizing the social and economic benefits of halting COVID-19 requires investing in a fast and fair global rollout of COVID-19 vaccines. CARE estimates that for every $1 a country or donor government invests in vaccine doses, they need to invest $5.00 in delivering the vaccine.

Investments in frontline health workers are a critical component in this comprehensive vaccination cost. Of the $5.00 in delivery costs, $2.50 has to go to funding, training, equipping, and supporting health workers—especially women—who administer vaccines, run education campaigns, connect communities to health services, and build the trust required for patients to get vaccines. For these investments to work, they must pay, protect and respect women frontline health workers and their rights—a cost that is largely absent from recent WHO estimates on vaccine rollout costs. No current global conversations or guidance on vaccine costs includes the full cost of community health workers or long-term personnel costs.

Investing in a fast and fair global vaccine distribution will save twice as many lives as maximizing vaccine doses for the wealthiest countries in the world. Even better, investing in vaccine equality will speed up economic recoveries in every country in the world. For every $1 invested in vaccines in less wealthy countries, wealthy countries will see $4.80 of economic benefit because economies can fully re-open sooner. Failing to make this investment could cost wealthy economies $4.5 trillion in economic losses.

Current global debates are focused so narrowly on equitable access to for vaccine doses that they largely overlook the importance of delivering vaccines—and the key role women frontline health workers play in vaccine delivery. Of 58 global policy statements on vaccines, only 10 refer to the costs of delivery at all—and these are primarily technical advisories from the World Health Organization. No government donors are discussing the importance of vaccine delivery systems that are necessary to ending COVID-19. Only one statement—from Norway—refers to the importance of women health workers as part of the solution to ending COVID-19.

As new and dangerous strains of COVID-19 emerge in countries that are struggling to access the vaccine and control the pandemic, every day we wait for fair global vaccination allows for more contagious strains that spread around the world. The more chances the virus has to mutate in non-vaccinated populations, the higher the risk for everyone. Comprehensive global vaccine delivery plans that make sure the vaccine gets to people who need it—and that those people are ready to get the vaccine when it arrives—are the only way to end this threat. No one is safe until everyone is safe.
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Gender, Disability and Inclusion Analysis for COVID-19 and Tropical Cyclone Harold

When Tropical Cyclone Harold hit on the 2nd April, the Solomon Islands was among the first countries forced to grapple with the complex intersection of COVID-19 and disaster. While the country has managed to contain the spread of COVID-19 and prevent community transmission to date, the pandemic is still having a major impact on everyday life for men, women, boys and girls. Lock-down measures, the abrupt cessation of tourism, severe disruptions to international trade and other flow-on effects of the global pandemic (combined with the effects of TC Harold and pre-existing vulnerabilities) are resulting in widespread income and job losses, heightened stress and tension, increased family violence, displacement, and disrupted access to education, health, and water and sanitation.
If community transmission of COVID-19 occurs, there will be a public health crisis with complex contextual challenges. These include a population dispersed across isolated islands and limited resources, including limited access to quality health services.
The current COVID-19 impacts are disproportionately affecting women, girls and people with disabilities in the Solomon Islands, and this will be exacerbated in the case of a wider COVID-19 outbreak. All humanitarian programming must consider gender roles and responsibilities and the existing patterns of community participation and leadership, in order to ‘do no harm’ and help facilitate a gender and disability inclusive approach to COVID-19 prevention and recovery.

This gender, disability and inclusion analysis has the following objectives:
* To analyse and understand the different impacts that COVID-19 and TC Harold is having on women, men, girls, boys, people living with disabilities and other vulnerable groups in the Solomon Islands;
* To inform humanitarian programming in the Solomon Islands based on the different needs of women, men, boys, girls and people living with disabilities with a particular focus on gender-based violence (GBV) and livelihoods. Read More...

Papua New Guinea COVID-19 RGA

The impacts – direct and indirect – of the COVID-19 pandemic fall disproportionately on the most vulnerable and marginalized groups in society. PNG presents a range of contextual challenges, including difficult geography. Access to quality health services is limited, due to a lack of infrastructure, equipment, and qualified personnel3. Services are easily stretched or overwhelmed, and provision of specialised services and intensive care is limited. In the current situation, this can pose a problem of access to care if the number of infected people increases4. Coupled with gender inequality, which remains pervasive across the Pacific, in particular in the critical domains of leadership and decision making, access to and control of resources and gender-based violence5, the public health response to COVID-19 can become immeasurably more complex. Read More...

STOP Southeast Asia Impact Reflections

Sexual harassment is any unwanted, unwelcome or uninvited behaviour of a sexual nature which could be expected to make a person feel humiliated, intimidated or offended. Female garment workers experience sexual harassment in their workplace, generally have limited legal protections, lack job security and work in an environment where there is often impunity for the harassment they experience. In Cambodia alone, sexual harassment costs in the garment industry USD $89 million per annum in lost productivity.

After four years of work, independent evaluations found the STOP project had assisted factory management to set up clearer guidelines and mechanisms for dealing with and preventing sexual harassment. It also empowered female workers to be confident to report sexual harassment incidents and become more aware of their rights. Read More...

Baseline Study on “Improving lives of Rohingya refugees and host community members in Bangladesh through sexual and reproductive healthcare integrated with gender-based violence prevention and response” Project

In response to the health and protection needs of the Rohingya refugees and the host communities in Cox ́s Bazar, CARE is implementing the project “Improving lives of Rohingya refugees and host community members in Bangladesh through sexual and reproductive healthcare integrated with gender-based violence prevention and response” with funding support by German Federal Foreign Office. This is a two year project targeting Rohingya refuges of camp 11, 12, 15 and 16 and vulnerable host communities of Jaliapalong union for GBV and SRH services.
To achieve improved sexual and reproductive health, GBV survivor support and protection from GBV of Rohingya Refugees in Cox ́s Bazar in Bangladesh, this project works across three outcomes. Firstly general and sexual and reproductive (SRH) health services will be provided through decetralised health centers which will rove around the target areas to provide services to people at their doorsteps. Improved Menstrual Hygiene management (MHM) is the second outcome of this project. There is an absence of space for washing and drying menstrual hyiene materials, leading women and girls to risk their health by drying their materials indoors. Through this project, therefore, two MHM spaces will be constructed next to CARE’s existing women and girls’ safe spaces (WGSS) in camps 12 and 16. The construction will be accompanied with training to ensure that the spaces are used appropriate. The third project outcome focuses on prevention of and response to gender-based violence. Services include psychosocial counselling, referral of GBV survivors, life-skills training, information and awareness-raising and recreational activities. These activities are complemented by community outreach activities, conducted through Rohingya volunteers, to ensure that the communities know about and can access the WGSS, and challenging harmful social norms associated with GBV. Community outreach will take place in camps 12 and 16 amongst refugee populations.
This report is 22 pages long. Read More...

Women’s involvement in coffee agroforestry value- chains Financial training, village savings and loans associations, and decision power in Northwest Vietnam

Colleagues in Vietnam and at CCAFS and the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) carried out some research on our work in the coffee value chain (TEAL).

This study assessed VSLA impacts and related training on gender equality and women’s access to coffee markets in an ongoing coffee- project in northwest Vietnam.

Applying the Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (WEAI), women rated perceptions of their decision-making over a range of 18 tasks related to household and agricultural responsibilities and use of income and social activities (over 18 months). There were improvements in decision-making power in categories with previously low participation and increased sharing of domestic responsibilities (biggest gains were decision-making over large purchases and use of income). Also found that husbands to women in the study embraced more equal sharing of responsibility and decision-making with their wives.
This report is 40 pages long. Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) Mopti Mali April 2020

The ongoing crisis in Mali has led to levels of socioeconomic disruption and displacement at an unprecedented scale. There are numerous factors that contribute to aggravate/worsen the situation - political crises, decades of drought, structural food insecurity, climate change, high rates of poverty, and high rates of youth unemployment. In many areas traditional livelihoods have been usurped by political conflict or by drought, causing extremely high rates of displacement and food insecurity. Since 2017 there have been significant increases in violent attacks and rates of displacement, and the crisis continues to grow in scope and scale into 2020 (OCHA 2020).
The first few months of 2020 saw escalating violence and conflict, leading to a sharp rise in internal displacements, the continued disruption of markets, and a deterioration in the supply of basic social services. The results from the recent food and nutrition security analysis (Cadre Harmonisé, November 2019) indicate that from October to December 2019, 648,330 people are estimated to be food insecure – representing an increase of 250 percent compared to the same time last year (WFP 2020).
Mali is a highly patriarchal society, with institutionalized gender inequality that marginalizes women. The effects of the crisis have not affected all equally, and there is significant evidence that there are significant differences, with the resources, rights, and afforded to women, men, boys, girls, and other groups of individuals, requiring different coping strategies. High levels of diversity in ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and circumstance within communities bring about important intersections between power and vulnerability that further prioritize and marginalize certain individuals. As the crisis in Mali continues to rapidly evolve, it is critical to ensure that humanitarian interventions are designed to respond to the needs of women, men, boys, girls, people with disabilities, and other vulnerable groups.
To better understand the experiences of women, men, boys within this highly dynamic and rapidly evolving crisis, CARE Mali conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis in March 2020, with the objective of analysing and understanding how the insecurity and conflict in the Mopti region has influenced women, men, girls, boys, people with disabilities, and other specific groups; as well as to identify and propose solutions to limitations women face to full participation in decision making; and to provide practical advice to decision-making to improve gender integration in humanitarian response programming and planning. Of key importance was the generation of recommendations to the Harande program, a USAID Food for Peace program being led by CARE and implemented in the Mopti region from 2015-2020. Read More...

A Win-Win for Gender and Nutrition: Testing A Gender-Transformative Approach From Asia In Africa

Since 2016, CARE Burundi has partnered with Great Lakes Inkingi Development (GLID), RBU2000, and the University of Burundi/Agronomy department and the Africa Center for Gender, Social Research and Impact Assessment to implement and test the EKATA approach – Empowerment through Knowledge And Transformative Action – integrated into an agriculture program to test its effectiveness against a typical gender mainstreaming approach (Gender Light) and a Control (with agriculture interventions only) in a modified randomized control trial, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The Win-Win project randomly assigned collines to EKATA, Gender Light and Control groups. Baseline data was collected in 2016 – Midterm was conducted in 2018, and end-line data was collected in 2020 from a random sample of 1,315 households and 1,849 individuals (1,059 female heads of household, and 790 male heads of household). Additionally, the project conducted 36 individual in-depth interviews, disaggregated by sex and age – and male- or female-headed households – at baseline, midline and end-line. This data was complimented with focus group discussions (FGDs). The evaluation looked at the impact of EKATA compared with Gender
Light and Control on several areas, including rice production (which was the main focus crop), income and wealth, gender equality and women’s empowerment. The cost-effectiveness of these approaches also was analyzed. The evaluation used the project level Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (Pro-WEAI) to measure changes in gender equality and women’s empowerment. Read More...

Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Program II 2016-2019

The Women-Girls Empowerment and Civil Society Governance Project (PEF-GS) called MAAYA DANBE in the local language, is funded by the Norwegian government through CARE Norway for a period of four (04) years (2016-2019) and aims to empower women and girls facing poverty, inequality, violence and social exclusion to claim and realize their human rights. The report is 82 pages long. Read More...

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