Haiti

What Does Gender-Sensitive Cash and Voucher Assistance Look Like?

CARE is committed to being “cash ready” to achieve breakthroughs for women and girls in its cash and voucher assistance (CVA) and to convene other stakeholders on the gendered aspects of CVA. Building that commitment, CARE commissioned a study on gender-sensitive CVA from its own project participants. The study aimed at understanding the:
- Extent to which women, men, boys, and girls have been involved in the design of CVA and the implications of this involvement.
- Potential for CVA to foster positive and sustainable gender roles and relations that contribute to gender equity.
- Gender-related barriers and risks associated with collecting and receiving CVA including social and cultural
attitudes and protection risks. Read More...

Baseline Evaluation: Partners for Learning – P4L

Key results of the project evaluation

In the P4L intervention areas, we estimated that approximately 5.7 % 1 of children are out of school girls and boys (OOSGB) who come from most rural households (72%), in female-headed households (63%), and extremely poor and their education expenses consume a large part of their global expenses (59%). Most of the surveyed OOSGB are between the ages of 7-14 (66%) without a large difference regarding their sex (girls or boys).

The dropout situation was measured; it is estimated to at a level of 3% mostly in the rural areas (77%) and more frequent among older children from 15-17 years (6.6%). The reasons for non-enrollment or dropout are varied and among others we will mention: High domestic workload for the children; Children’s participation in agricultural activities; Lack of economic means to pay fees, material, textbooks, shoes, and/or uniform; Lack of identification documents (baptismal certificate / birth certificate / national ID) for enrolment; Repeated teacher absences, caused often by strike; Hunger (absence of school feeding program); Distance between home and school.

Main recommendations / perspectives

Considering the results obtained from the data analysis some keys actions are recommended such as more campaigns for providing a ID document to each children; more awareness campaigns to reduce children’s workload until the total elimination of the child labor exists; more awareness activities for enrolling children at the normal school age (5-6 years) regardless of their sex; sensitization for parents around community-based retention and consistent attendance of their children at school; and by increased support to families to raise their household income. Read More...

Kore Lavi Safety Net Beneficiary Resilience Assessment

As part of its mandate, the Kore Lavi program has developed and established a food voucher-based social safety net model for the poorest households in conjunction with the Haitian Government – through the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labor (MAST). This Resilience Assessment contributes to a stronger understanding of the current food security and resilience situations of the most vulnerable program beneficiaries.

Based upon the data collected, the social safety net members – which is considered as the study sampling universe – are mainly affected by Illness, death and drought, respectively. The experiences shared by the respondents also revealed that they often face several types of shocks and stressors simultaneously.

The food voucher had a very positive impact and helped a lot during each key moment: before the shock or stressor affected the respondent, immediately after, sometime after and now. In the different stories that were shared, a certain number of respondents mentioned that they have no other means to ensure their food security - other than the Kore Lavi food vouchers. With regard to the food vouchers indirect contribution, it is important to highlight that 59% of
respondents used the money they saved to pay school fees and 28% to pay medical fees. 36% save it in their Village Saving and Loans Association (VSLA). Yet, there is also an emerging group that used the money to invest in agricultural endeavors and start-up income generating activities.

When comparing the three main types of assets (personal, social and physical-financial resources), it could be observed that especially vulnerable respondents tended to rely on social resources. Generally, the respondents used more negative coping mechanisms that compromise their food security like eating less or less preferred meals per day (58%), reducing expenditures related to household needs (32%), producing charcoal (33%), reducing agriculture production area (20%) and livestock (19%) or selling assets.

The study identified that 22% of VSLA members followed resilient pathways versus 16% of non VSLA respondents. In almost all the signifier questions, there were found small differences between both groups, but not as much as it was initially expected by the Kore Lavi team. Read More...

Kore Lavi Title II Program Haiti – Midterm Evaluation

This reports presents the findings, conclusions and recommendations related to the Kore Lavi mid-term evaluation.

DESCRIPTION OF KORE LAVI. Kore Lavi’s Theory of Change holds that positive and lasting transformation must happen within interrelated domains: (1) where the effective social safety net programming and complementary services reach the most vulnerable populations and protect their access to food while building self-reliance; (2) that achieve breadth and depth in behavior and social change needed to tackle under-nutrition among vulnerable women and children; and (3) that institutionalize accountability, transparency and quality of delivery for mutually reinforcing social protection programs under the leadership of MAST.

EVALUATION METHODOLOGY. The evaluation employed three data collection methodologies: document review, key informant interviews, and focus group discussions.

PRIMARY FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS.
At the time of the MTE, Kore Lavi had completed data collection in 16 communes demonstrating the ability to adapt and innovate to address the initial data quality problems that existed at the beginning of the program.

In terms of its implementation on the ground, the food voucher scheme is operating well in identifying voucher recipients and enrolling them in the program, distributing food to beneficiaries via paper or electronic vouchers, recruiting and managing the network of collaborating vendors, enforcing policies governing the scheme and overseeing operations. Food received by beneficiary households from both paper and electronic vouchers is inevitably shared with non-household members, including neighbors and even strangers. The VSLA scheme has effectively provided a mechanism by which large numbers of vulnerable women and men living in program communities can save and access small loans at reasonable interest rates to invest in their businesses or children’s education or for other purposes.

SO3 social behavioral change communications interventions are, on the whole, well designed and well implemented. Care Groups, moreover, appear to be an effective methodology for mobilizing women and communicating critical SBCC messages. Community health agents and Lead Mothers play a critical role in SO3 activities. While they are, for the most part, doing a good job and are satisfied with their roles, they also have a number of legitimate concerns related to the lack of monetary compensation and reimbursement for expenses incurred. The program has done a good job identifying and reaching the targeted women and infants.

Kore Lavi has taken a holistic approach to gender integration from design to implementation and has made a conscious and good faith effort to integrate gender considerations in each of the four program SOs.

Kore Lavi has prioritized information management and has demonstrated a clear institutional interest in improving knowledge and learning.

Read More...

Baseline Study of the Title II Development Food Assistance Program in Haiti

In fiscal year 2013, the U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Office of Food for Peace (FFP) awarded funding to CARE International and its partners, Action Contre La Faim International (ACF) and the U.N. World Food Programme (WFP), to implement a Title II development food assistance program in Haiti.1 The four-year Kore Lavi Program directly supports the Government of Haiti’s (GOH) social protection efforts. The overall objective of the program is to reduce food insecurity and vulnerability by supporting the GOH in establishing a replicable safety net system and expanding capacities for preventing child undernutrition.

KEY FINDINGS.
The Title II program area residents face challenges in all four pillars of food security: (1) availability of food, (2) access to food, (3) utilization of food and (4) stability.

Survey results indicate that 57.5 percent of households suffer from moderate hunger and 13.5 percent of households suffer from severe hunger.

An HDDS of 6.2 indicates that households in the Kore Lavi Program area typically can access and consume 6 of 12 basic food groups. Qualitative data indicate that food consumption is pragmatic at the household level. Individual families eat what is available, what they can grow or what they can afford to purchase. Despite these challenges, many respondents spoke ardently to beliefs about the cultural significance of certain foods, while also holding strong opinions on imported food in comparison to locally produced food.

The household survey data show that 69 percent of all households have an adequate level of food consumption, 22 percent score at the borderline level, and 9 percent score at the poor level.

Across the Kore Lavi Program area, 43.6 percent of households currently live in extreme poverty (less than the international poverty line of USD$1.25 at 2005 prices), with average daily per capita expenditures of constant USD$ 2.10.

The household survey data show that 40 percent of households use an improved drinking water source and 16 percent of households use a non-shared improved sanitation facility.

As measured by body mass index (BMI), the nutritional status of women 15-49 years of age who are not pregnant or two months post-partum is generally satisfactory despite a lack of dietary diversity.

The survey data reveal that 8 percent of children under five years of age in the Kore Lavi Program area show signs of being moderately or severely underweight, and 19 percent of children under five years of age are stunted.

Across the qualitative data, views about gender equality tended to be polarized, rooted historically and in tradition. Read More...

Projet Haïti Gagne, Lire, Ecrire et Réussir

Le projet Haïti Gagne, financé par UNICEF, vise à améliorer les compétences en lecture et en écriture des élèves dans les 53 écoles partenaires dans les départements du Nord et du Sud’Est. A cet effet, plusieurs initiatives susceptibles de faciliter l’apprentissage des élèves en salle de classe ont été prises, telles que : Le support aux élèves au niveau des fournitures scolaires, L’implication des parents et de la communauté dans le suivi de l’apprentissage des enfants, la formation continue des enseignants sur la méthode « M’ap Li Net Ale », etc.

La comparaison des résultats de l’évaluation mi-parcours et ceux de l’étude de base montrent que les élèves, en particulier ceux de la 2e AF, cette année ont obtenu de meilleurs scores dans presque toutes les sous-taches. Indépendamment des caractéristiques sociodémographiques (niveau et département) des élèves, la proportion des élèves qui ont obtenu zéro, cette année a diminué dans presque toutes les sous-taches, par rapport à celle observée au cours de l’année académique antérieure. Read More...

Final Evaluation Partnership for Learning

The Partnership for Learning (P4L) project is funded by Educate a Child (EAC) P4L whose goal is to return 6 million out-of-school children to school all around the world. P4L has been implemented by CARE Haiti since November 2013 in partnership with several institutions that provided leverage funding such as the Haitian Ministry of Education and Vocational Training (MENFP), Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR), TOMS, LIV Livres Solidaires, LIDE, GAP Inc and other local and international institutions. P4L is implemented in the departments of Ouest, Grand’Anse, Centre and Artibonite.

At the end of the project, 53,059 girls and boys had been enrolled by the project in 465 partner schools. The enrollment rate of formerly out of school children age 5-17 supported by the project (parent survey data) is estimated as 95.4% in school year 2017-2018, compared to 92.0% among the children age 5-17 from randomly sampled households. There was a statistically significant difference (chi-squared = 14.399, df=3, p<0.01) in the enrolment rate per department, with the department of Centre having the lowest rate of children 5-17 years in school (93.0%) and Grand’Anse with the highest at 97.7%. Read More...

Kore Lavi: School Feeding Program How to Improve Program and Lower Costs

This report is based off of fieldwork conducted between May 29th and August 9th in Haiti of Jade Womack, a Master’s student in Applied Economics Management at Cornell University under the Cornell-CARE collaboration. The author, or referred to as “researcher,” was interning on behalf of CARE USA in CARE Haiti as a Research Fellow for the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University. The findings of this report do not represent the views of CARE USA, CARE Haiti, or Cornell University and should be considered solely the work and views of the researcher. The researcher investigated the School Feeding Program in Thomassique and Cerca La Source which was part of the SO2 component of the Kore Lavi Program–a USAID sponsored program enacted by CARE Haiti. The report includes detailed information on the demographics of vendors, agriculture in Haiti, profit margins, cost reduction calculations, vendor perceptions, and recommendations. The researcher had two guiding questions, the first as to what could be improved in the program, and the second on how to reduce the cost of the program. The researcher interviewed vendors from 3 of the participating 6 schools: NGE, PDR, and RiO which are all in Thomassique region. Read More...

Assistance d’urgence aux personnes vulnérables affectées par l’ouragan Matthew dans la Grand ‘Anse

Pour appuyer les ménages de la commune de Jérémie touchés par l’ouragan dévastateur Matthew, CARE, avec un financement de la DG ECHO, a mis en place le projet d’Assistance d'urgence en sécurité alimentaire, éducation et abris aux personnes vulnérables affectées par l'ouragan Matthew dans la Grand ‘Anse. Ce projet de 20 mois (décembre 2016 à Juillet 2018) a soutenu 2 305 ménages à travers une multitude d’activités utilisant une approche intégrée. Ce rapport présente un état des lieux de la mise en oeuvre du projet ECHO au niveau de la commune de Jérémie. Il relate les points forts ainsi que les points à améliorer servant de leçons apprises pour tout projet d’assistance d’urgence dans un contexte semblable. (42 pages) Read More...

FINAL REPORT – MIDLINE EVALUATION PARTNERS FOR LEARNING (P4L)

The Partners for Learning (P4L) project is implemented by CARE in collaboration with 20 partner organizations and 465 schools since November 2013. P4L’s goal is to identify, enroll, and retain 50,000 out-of-school girls and boys (OOSGB) in the Haitian education system. After three years of implementation, this midline evaluation was conducted to assess the prevalence of OOSGB in targeted areas, given contextual changes such as the destruction caused by Hurricane Matthew; analyze the contribution of P4L training activities on teaching practices; and assess the validity of P4L’s strategies.

The recommendations from the midline are:
- Increase mobilization efforts to identify and enroll OOSGB in areas of high out-of-school prevalence;
- Need to reinforce the project strategy to strengthen retention, as dropout remains a major issue in targeted areas;
- Mobilize other actors in the education sector (MENFP, NGOs through CEC, civil society associations, etc.) to design a national strategy to address retention issues;
- Promote VSLA in each area to support families to enroll and keep their children in school;
- Mobilize funds and create partnerships to improve infrastructure conditions in partner
schools. [39 pages] Read More...

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