Gender Assessment

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) Mopti Mali April 2020

The ongoing crisis in Mali has led to levels of socioeconomic disruption and displacement at an unprecedented scale. There are numerous factors that contribute to aggravate/worsen the situation - political crises, decades of drought, structural food insecurity, climate change, high rates of poverty, and high rates of youth unemployment. In many areas traditional livelihoods have been usurped by political conflict or by drought, causing extremely high rates of displacement and food insecurity. Since 2017 there have been significant increases in violent attacks and rates of displacement, and the crisis continues to grow in scope and scale into 2020 (OCHA 2020).
The first few months of 2020 saw escalating violence and conflict, leading to a sharp rise in internal displacements, the continued disruption of markets, and a deterioration in the supply of basic social services. The results from the recent food and nutrition security analysis (Cadre Harmonisé, November 2019) indicate that from October to December 2019, 648,330 people are estimated to be food insecure – representing an increase of 250 percent compared to the same time last year (WFP 2020).
Mali is a highly patriarchal society, with institutionalized gender inequality that marginalizes women. The effects of the crisis have not affected all equally, and there is significant evidence that there are significant differences, with the resources, rights, and afforded to women, men, boys, girls, and other groups of individuals, requiring different coping strategies. High levels of diversity in ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and circumstance within communities bring about important intersections between power and vulnerability that further prioritize and marginalize certain individuals. As the crisis in Mali continues to rapidly evolve, it is critical to ensure that humanitarian interventions are designed to respond to the needs of women, men, boys, girls, people with disabilities, and other vulnerable groups.
To better understand the experiences of women, men, boys within this highly dynamic and rapidly evolving crisis, CARE Mali conducted a Rapid Gender Analysis in March 2020, with the objective of analysing and understanding how the insecurity and conflict in the Mopti region has influenced women, men, girls, boys, people with disabilities, and other specific groups; as well as to identify and propose solutions to limitations women face to full participation in decision making; and to provide practical advice to decision-making to improve gender integration in humanitarian response programming and planning. Of key importance was the generation of recommendations to the Harande program, a USAID Food for Peace program being led by CARE and implemented in the Mopti region from 2015-2020. Read More...

Gender Sensitive Climate Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment for Harande Development Food Assistance Program

The Human Capital, Accountability and Resilience program for the Promotion of Nutrition Security, Livelihoods and Accountability, or Harandé, is designed to promote resilience of participants through coordinated interventions to improve food and nutrition security, while strengthening the capacity
of the population at the household and community level to respond and deal with a myriad of shocks and stress factors. Recognizing climate change, gender inequality along with the vulnerability of some sections of the community as an obstacle underlying food and nutrition insecurity, and a key stressor towards instability and insecurity, a holistic understanding of gender sensitive‐climate vulnerability and adaptive capacities of target communities is an imperative step for the success of program interventions. The report is 77 pages long. Read More...

Learning Women’s Participation in the Cotton Value Chain

The present gender analysis study of the Cotton Value Chain (CVC) was undertaken by CARE India as part of its ongoing three-year project to strengthen CVC in the Vidarbha region of Maharashtra state. The project, operating in the Jalgaon Jamod block of the Buldhana district in Maharashtra, aims to improve the productive engagement of resource-constrained women in resilient and sustainable cotton-based farming. It seeks to empower women smallholders from marginal communities and increase their productivity, income, and living standard to build a strong and sustainable CVC. The gender analysis study was conducted with a view to developing a robust understanding of gender relations, roles, and outcomes as they play out in the CVC of the project area. Read More...

COVID-19 impact on Vietnamese apparel and footwear workers: Workers’ Perspective

In April 2020, the Public Private Partnerships Cooperation Group for sustainable apparel and footwear sector in Vietnam, consisting of over 40 members from the Ministries of Industry and Trade Natural Resources and Environment, Labor, Invalids and Social Affairs and VITAS, LEFASO, brands, development partners and domestic and international NGOs, conducted a comprehensive assessment of the impact of COVID-19 on the apparel and footwear sector. The aim of the assessment was to seek solutions from policy perspectives, social security, sustainable economic development, environmental protection and the role of stakeholders in the supply chain to mitigate impacts of the pandemic. One of the key components of the assessment is this analysis of the impact of COVID-19 on AFS workers’ lives conducted by CARE and sponsored by TARGET and the National Federation of Christian Trade Unions in
the Netherlands (CNV). This report also references findings from the qualitative research conducted by the Center for Development and Integration (CDI).
Purposes of the assessment of COVID-19 impacts on apparel and footwear sector workers:
1. To analyze the impact of COVID-19 on workers’ lives in the apparel and footwear industry across three major areas: economic, health, and society with a focus on gendered impacts and employment relation.
2. To identify the needs of AFS workers, especially female workers, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
3. To provide recommendations to businesses, brands, associations, unions, governments and development organizations on supporting workers to recover from the impact of COVID-19.
The information and data included in this report represent the key findings of the COVID-19 impact
assessment study with specific policy implications for enterprises, trade unions and government. Read More...

When Time Won’t Wait (Spanish, French, and Arabic)

Humanitarian crises can offer a ‘window of opportunity’ to transform unequal gender relations and shift harmful gender norms. Integration of gender into humanitarian programming ensures that the specific vulnerabilities, needs, capacities and priorities of women, girls, men and boys — related to pre-existing gender roles and inequalities, along with the impacts of the crisis — are recognised and addressed.
Sound gender analysis and programming from the outset is critical to effective crisis response in the short-term, and equitable and empowering societal change in the long-term. CARE’s Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) approach and tool, developed during the humanitarian response in Syria in 2013, aims to drive a shift to locally driven and women-centered needs assessment which influences how needs are defined and responses are developed. The approach aims to provide essential information about gender roles and responsibilities, capacities, and vulnerabilities together with programming recommendations in situations where time is of the essence
and resources can be scarce. The ultimate goal of such an approach is to influence humanitarian response, program design and implementation to ensure that it supports not only the immediate needs of women and girls but also upholds their rights. CARE’s RGA has now been used in over 50 crises around the word and is featured as good practice in the Inter-Agency Standing Committee’s (IASC) Gender Handbook for Humanitarian Action. With rapidly increasing interest in and adoption of CARE’s RGA approach, discussion and questions continue as to whether increased awareness of gender, power and disaggregated data sets are translating into safer, more responsive, and effective aid.
To answer these questions, CARE commissioned an external evaluation to ‘provide an analysis of the effectiveness and influence of the RGA approach on adapting programming to improve gendered outcomes for crises-affected communities.’ The scope of the evaluation was global and focused on rapid gender analyses and related humanitarian programming over the period 2015-2020. These are executive summaries in Spanish, Arabic, and French. You can find the full report in English here: http://careevaluations.org/evaluation/when-time-wont-wait-cares-rapid-gender-analysis-approach-external-evaluation/ Read More...

The Impact of COVID-19 on Women in Democratic Republic of Congo

Evidence worldwide indicates that women are disproportionately affected by the health and socio-economic impacts of intervention
measures applied for the control of COVID-19. Women make up the majority of the informal labour sector and are more likely to suffer job losses or reduced income as a result of closed borders, markets and shops, and restricted movement. Sexual and reproductive health services are often the first to face restrictions in terms of availability and access. School closures place an additional burden on women, who take on childcare responsibilities, including ensuring adequate nutrition. Girls who cannot go to school are at increased risk of sexual violence, pregnancy, and early marriage - a trend that was widely observed in areas affected by Ebola during the 2014-2016 epidemic in West Africa. Risks are exacerbated for women and girls living in the poorest households in remote rural areas.
Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in March 2020, mixed methods data produced by the Social Sciences Analytics Cell (CASS) and its partners presents a dynamic where pre-existing disparities between men and women in terms of health, social protection and economic status are being exacerbated by the outbreak and its response. This report presents an integrated multidisciplinary analysis of the impact of COVID-19 and its response on women and girls in the DRC, highlighting changes that have occurred since the beginning of the outbreak. The objective of this report is to provide evidence to support decision-making for strategies to respond to the outbreak to ensure that the health, protection and economic security of women and girls is prioritised. Read More...

COVID-19 Rapid Gender Analysis DR Congo

Depuis le début de l’épidémie déclarée le 10 mars 2020 jusqu’en date du 26 Aout 2020, le cumul des cas est de 9.915, dont 9.914 cas confirmés et 1 cas probable. Au total, il y a eu 255 décès (254 cas confirmés et 1 cas probable) et 9.020 personnes guéries.i
En RDC, la prévention et la réponse à la pandémie COVID 19 sont guidées au niveau National par un « Plan de préparation et de riposte à l’épidémie de COVID 19 » publié en début Mars 2020. Ce plan comprend 9 objectifs bien définis mais les aspects spécifiques aux questions de protection transversale et de genre sont faiblement développés.
Quoi que les données nationales qui renseignent sur la situation épidémiologique en RDC ne soient pas désagrégées par âge et par sexe, il est évident que les hommes, femmes, filles et garçons des différents âges, situations sociales confondues ne sont pas touchées de la même manière par la pandémie à COVID 19 surtout que déjà traditionnellement, il s’observe un déséquilibre entre les hommes, les femmes, les filles et les garçons au niveau des rôles, responsabilités, accès et contrôle, participation et prise de décision et au niveau des aspects de protection.
Dans le souci d’améliorer sa mise en oeuvre pendant la période de la pandémie, CARE I DRC a fait une analyse genre rapide période du 15 Avril jusqu’en fin Mai 2020. Une mise à jour a été faite sur base des informations recueillies le 18 Juillet 2020. Cette analyse qualitative vise à renseigner sur les problèmes spécifiques des femmes, hommes, filles et garçons pendant cette période de pandémie à COVID 19. Les éléments issus des données secondaires appuieront la triangulation des informations. Les thématiques d’analyse sont : rôles et responsabilités, accès aux ressources, services et l’information, prise des décisions, influence des croyances, sécurité, et sante / bien être. Les informations ont été recueillies dans les villes urbaines et cités rurales dans lesquelles CARE I mène des activités et a des bureaux et au moins 1 staff. Les provinces concernées sont le Nord Kivu (Beni, Butembo, Goma et territoire de Nyiragongo), Sud Kivu (Bukavu et Uvira) et la ville province de Kinshasa. Read More...

A RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS OF THE AUGUST 2020 BEIRUT PORT EXPLOSION

On August 4 2020, the devastating Beirut explosion shook the whole city to its core, taking the lives of 191 persons (120 males, 58 females, and 13 unspecified), wounding at least 6,500, and leaving 300,000 people displaced. Prior to the explosion, Lebanon’s crisis has been underpinned by extreme structural gender inequalities: Lebanon ranks 145 out of 153 countries in the World Economic Forum Global Gender Gap Report, due to low rates of women’s economic and political participation and patriarchal socio-cultural norms. The impact of the explosion compounded with the worst economic crisis in the history of Lebanon and the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to significantly push back what gains have been made on gender equality in the country.
This joint rapid gender analysis (RGA) of the Beirut port explosion assesses how diverse women, men, girls, boys, and gender minorities were affected by the events of August 4, with a close look at the specific impact on older, disabled, refugee, migrant, and LBQT (lesbian, bisexual, queer, and trans) women.
The assessment combined a secondary review of existing data with primary data collection. Secondary analysis included reviewing 45 reports, sit-reps, and needs assessments published by United Nations (UN) agencies, international and non-governmental organizations (I/NGOs) since the explosion and conducting gender analysis on three quantitative datasets from assessments carried out in response to the explosion. Primary data consisted of 16 key informant interviews (KIIs), 4 focus group discussions (FGDs) with 17 participants, and 16 community interviews – a total of 49 people overall.
Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Northeast Nigeria – Borno

Borno is a state in northeast Nigeria. Borno has been the epicentre of the Organized A since it began its insurgency in 2009. Records of Boko Haram operations show that thousands of people have either been murdered or kidnapped as a result of the group’s activities from July 27, 2009, through late 2019.
For Borno, COVID-19 is a “crisis within a crisis” and presents a range of challenges in a context with limited resources. In most localities (named local government areas or LGAs), access to quality health services, including intensive care, is limited. Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) e.g. malaria, water borne illnesses (including cholera) and malnutrition represent the main cause of premature mortality in the state. In addition, food security and livelihoods are particularly precarious due to semi-subsistence lifestyles and heavy dependence on the informal sector for income.
Because Borno has been in a protracted crisis since 2009, gender has been a key consideration in the response. However, an outbreak of COVID-19 in Borno continues to disproportionately affect women and girls in a number of ways, as women are more likely to stay home to help with the increased domestic tasks. With the fear of contracting COVID-19, permission granted by men to access health services is decreasing which is negatively affecting women and girls’ access to maternal, sexual and reproductive health services. In addition, Gender Based Violence (GBV) service providers in Borno have reported a heightened risk of increased domestic violence in areas where pre-existing rates of violence against women in IDP camps are already very high. Additionally, with the recent loss of livelihoods, strained humanitarian interventions and inadequate field feedback handling mechanisms, Prevention of Sexual Harassment Exploitation and Abuse (PSHEA) and mitigation is a pressing concern as people in need are left vulnerable in the face of insufficient food and resources. Read More...

AN INTERSECTIONAL ANALYSIS OF GENDER AMONGST ROHINGYA REFUGEES AND HOST COMMUNITIES IN COX’S BAZAR

The Rohingya ethnic minority population in Myanmar have been persecuted over generations and are denied of their fundamental human rights. Violence, discrimination and persecution in Myanmar have eventually led the stateless Rohingya people to flee
to Bangladesh from Rakhine State in successive waves over the last four decades. Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees arrived in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, reaching the total number of 914,998 people and constituting the largest refugee camp
in the world. The rapid and sizable influx of Rohingya refugees now outnumbers locals nearly three to one in the two sub-districts, Ukhiya and Teknaf, where refugees and the subsequent humanitarian response have had an impact on the host community.
This inter-agency research is commissioned by ActionAid in collaboration with UNHCR and CARE Bangladesh to investigate how age, gender and diversity issues are addressed in the humanitarian response amongst Rohingya refugees and the host communities. The
quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 03 December 2019 to 07 January 2020. This transdisciplinary research aims to fill a significant gap by providing a critical analysis of the present status of gender relations addressed in humanitarian response, taking into consideration the intersectionality among specific needs based on age, gender and other diversity factors contributing to a person or group’s vulnerability.
This study was conducted prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the change in context, it has now become even more imperative to adapt existing mechanisms within the ongoing response, especially the need for increased Age, Gender and Diversity (AGD) analysis and monitoring of vulnerabilities. While COVID-19 was not a factor in this report, the recommendations of this report need to be addressed and implemented with the changing context in mind. Read More...

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