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Rapid Gender Analysis on Power and Participation Ségou region, Mali (GENRE+II PROJECT)

This Rapid Gender Analysis on Power and Participation (RGA-P) is part of the GENRE+II project in the cercles of Bla, Ségou and Barouéli in the Ségou region of Mali. The project is funded by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCDO) to build capacity for climate change adaptation, gender equality and social cohesion in the Ségou region.
This RGA-P is the first step in CARE's Women Lead in Emergencies (WLiE) model. It summarises the impact of the crisis on gender roles and relations, the capacity of women/girls to cope, participate and influence decision-making in response to the crisis, and offers ideas on how women can strengthen their own participation and leadership. The RGA-P is based on secondary and primary data collection carried out in March 2023 in eight communes in the cercles of Ségou, Bla and Barouéli in the Ségou region. Read More...

START Network Alert 630 Tuvalu (Drought)-Learning Grant Water and Hygiene Assessment Findings Report

In July 2022, the Government of Tuvalu declared a State of Emergency due to worsening drought conditions across the country. The northern islands were severely impacted, particularly Niutao, where local actors had to turn to distributing bottled water in response to a critical undersupply of household water for drinking and general purposes.
This survey was completed as part of a grant under the START learning initiative, and the main purpose was to conduct a water and hygiene focused needs assessment for drought-affected populations on the three northern islands of Nanumea, Nanumanga and Niutao, with a particular focus on gender and inclusion. The northern islands can be difficult to reach and are often not included in research projects for this reason. Conducting a needs assessment provides data that national and local actors can use to inform ongoing drought response efforts, particularly around longer-term, equitable access to water, as well as assisting in better planning and delivery in future responses. The number of people surveyed was 258, representing 22% of the total population aged 13 and over (although a few 12 year olds were included). A survey conducted in October 2022 by the Tuvalu National Disaster Management Office provided a starting point for the START learning grant exercise.
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HATUTAN Endline Evaluation

In this report, we present findings from the endline evaluation of the HATUTAN (Hahán ne’ebé Atu fó Tulun ho Nutrisaun no Edukasaun or Food to Support Nutrition and Education) program. Running between 2018 and 2023, the program worked in partnership with the Government of Timor-Leste and development stakeholders to address two strategic objectives: improved literacy of school-aged children and increased use of health, nutrition, and dietary practices. The program operated in 443 schools and communities within four of Timor-Leste’s most deprived municipalities, Ainaro, Ermera, Liquica, and Manatuto, supporting an estimated 105,967 target beneficiaries including school-aged children, teacher, school administrators, and community members. Key activities included support for the government-run School Feeding Program (SFP) and trainings targeting teachers, school administrators, and community members. Read More...

Uganda: Food insecurity a pressing concern

The Development Initiative for Northern Uganda (DINU) was a 38-month long project (January 2020 to February 2023) with an aim to improve food security, maternal and child nutrition, and household incomes for smallholder farmers in 11 districts of Uganda. The project has three major outcomes: increased production of diversified food by both men and women smallholder farmers, enhanced market accessibility for these farmers, and improved nutrition and family planning services through gender responsive community-based approaches. As a result, here was a significant 16.3% increase in adoption and production of diverse food crops and animal products, as well as 23.8% increase in the adoption of climate-smart technologies among the project participants. Read More...

Australian NGO Cooperation Program (ANCP) Meta-Review of Evaluations

This report presents the findings of a review of the evaluations of seven programs funded by DFAT through the ANCP and implemented by CARE (Australia and respective country partners).
The purpose is to identify and summarise lessons learned, areas for development and examples of good practice that will inform CARE Australia’s implementation of its new theory of change. The review is intended for both internal and external audiences, including DFAT. Read More...

7th Pacific Regional Conference on Disability

Video with interviews with some of the forum's participants.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ravvpwL8Woubq6ARNSJYuCKV1_96s8oD/view
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Rapid Gender Analysis Ukraine October 2023

This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) has been carried out to shed light on the gender dynamics, needs, experiences and challenges of women, men, adolescent girls and boys and people with diverse gender identities, from different groups and backgrounds, as they cope with the humanitarian crisis after more than one and a half years of full-scale war. The analysis explores how pre-existing and reinforced power relations affect people’s experiences of conflict, and how they cope with the ensuing humanitarian emergency. This report draws on primary data collected in four oblasts (Kharkivska, Dnipropetrovska, Odeska, and Mykolaivska), as well as secondary data from before and during the crisis. A mix of quantitative and qualitative research methods was used, including 45 key informant interviews (KIIs), 611 individual surveys, 12 focus group discussions (FGDs), 12 community mapping exercises and eight individual stories. Data was collected from a total of 735 individuals, of which 43% female adults, 28% male adults, 18% adolescent girls, and 11% adolescent boys, including 9.5% individuals living with some form of disability, and 3.9% identifying as LGBTQI+. Additionally, the role of women-led organizations and women’s rights organizations (WLOs/WROs) was highlighted, with a particular interest in understanding barriers and opportunities around leadership and participation in the humanitarian response.
The war in Ukraine is not gender neutral. Since the beginning of the full-scale invasion, women and men have been playing distinct and specific roles. As the humanitarian crisis ensues, a general trend has emerged: women are often providing alone for their families while facing loss of income, family separation, and massive disruptions in the provision of essential services; whilst many men are engaged in the more direct war efforts on the frontlines, exposing themselves to potential death, severe injuries and mental health distress. Although Ukraine has not yet adopted full
conscription, men between ages 18-60 may be called into military service unless they have legal grounds for deferment or exclusion. Many Ukrainian women have also voluntarily enrolled in the military and territorial defense forces.1 Yet, the mobilization of men is deeply rooted in beliefs around masculinity related to self-sacrifice on the battlefield and the defense of their country and family, which reinforces notions of feminine roles rooted in reproductive care. The implications of amplified and more polarized beliefs around gender roles will continue with the ongoing war and its aftermath, particularly for those who may not fit those social norms and expectations, such as people with disabilities and LGBTQI+ individuals. Read More...

Gaza Strip Rapid Gender Analysis: Brief

There is an increasing recognition that conflict is not gender neutral; in fact, protracted conflicts such as in Gaza create a landscape of multidimensional and intersectional vulnerabilities for diverse groups compounding over time (specifically around access to food, mobility, poverty, education, protection and employment) and disproportionately affect women and girls across all categories. The escalation of violence in Gaza and the surrounding region has led to an unfathomable level of death, deprivation and destruction for the most vulnerable populations and further compromises their ability to respond, adapt and build resilience to continued shock. Thus, the humanitarian response must account for these pre-existing vulnerabilities while integrating and adapting to the complexity of this unprecedented crisis through a gender and inclusive programming lens. This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA) aims to highlight existing gender, age and disability data and provide operational recommendations for the humanitarian response in Gaza, while centering ‘Do No Harm’ principles. Given the rapidly evolving context of this crisis, this RGA brief draws from secondary data to inform immediate programming and will be updated as more information becomes available and more in-depth information is needed to support the humanitarian response. Read More...

GENDER ANALYSIS FOR INCLUSIVE SMALL HOLDER FARMERS IN NORTHERN UGANDA (DINU PROJECT)

The Development Initiative for Northern Uganda (DINU) is a Government of Uganda program with support from the European Union. DINU was awarded to a CARE Denmark led Consortium comprising of CARE International in Uganda, Gulu Agricultural Development Company (GADC), Catholic Relief Services (CRS), Dynamic Agro-pastoralist Development Organization (DADO) and SORUDA. The consortium is implementing a project for inclusive market-based development for small holder farmers in Northern Uganda covering eleven districts.
Key Findings:
* Gender division of labour shows that women and girls do the bulk of unpaid care work. Women do 70% of household chores, and children 15%.
• Over 80% of couples report joint household decision making on sales and purchases but control over sales income is largely under men.
• Women are a majority in savings groups though borrowing is contested. Land is accessible to the entire household, but control is largely by men. Men also control credit, savings, and access to business skills.
• Gender norms influence nutrition, income, gender-based violence and enjoyment of SRHR. Read More...

The Vanuatu Pacific Partnerships for Gender Equality Project Baseline Assessment Report

Women’s economic justice is central to gender equality and sustainable development. Across the Pacific, women are fundamental to the subsistence and economies of their communities, however, women’s work in the Pacific is often undervalued, low-paid and insecure. CARE Australia’s Pacific Partnerships for Gender Equality program is a five-year intervention (2022 – 2027) designed to strengthen women’s economic justice and contribute to a resilient civil society in the Pacific. The program is funded by the Australian Government through the Australian NGO Cooperation Program (ANCP). Read More...

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