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Lesson Learned from the construction of a 1800m3 capacity gabion in Wadi Hassan Valley, Khanfer district, Aden governorate under Food for Assets (FFA) Project

What is the specific situation that the lesson learned relates to?
It is about this asset that serves and protects more than 5,000 acres of agricultural land from drought and adds value in different aspects such as increasing underground water level of Abyan and Aden, as such, leading to diversified livelihood options e.g. livestock rearing and bee farming.

How is this impacted by the local context/environment/culture?
The agricultural sector is one of the most important economic sectors in Abyan governorate, and the main source of income for most of the people, as many of them are engaged in agriculture activities. Abyan governorate is famous for its agricultural valleys including Wadi Banna, Wadi Hassan, Wadi Delta Abyan, Delta Ahour.

Because of previous conflicts and wars that occurred in Abyan, the irrigation system was destroyed and was subjected to destruction and neglect. The Abyan Delta agricultural area located in the districts of Zanzibar and Khanfar in Abyan governorate experienced high flow of water from seasonal rainfall, however, the flow of water irrigated a small part of agricultural areas in Khanfar and Zanzibar districts. The bulk of these flood water went into to the sea, as well as causing damages such as eroding farmers' lands, damaging roads, damaging irrigation channels, bridges, and even the destruction of homes that affected some villages and population centres.

After the failure of the dam project in Wadi Hassan in year 1992, many irrigation channels, including Hussein Canal, were deprived of floodwater, which led to the drought of agricultural lands, in the process, depriving more than 2000 families of their main source of income. Hussein Canal covers more than 5000 Hectares of agricultural land that has been deprived for more than ten years of seasonal floods, which is its main source of irrigation by torrents.

In this project, five villages (Al-Dergag, Al-Komblyah, Maykalan, Kadmat Al-Saeed qasem and Obar Otman) that are inter-connected as a sub-district were targeted and benefited from the floodwater that came through the Hussein Canal. Based on the community leaders and irrigation office’s request, a 1800m3 capacity Gabion (360 inter-connected sub-gabions each with size 5m length X 1m depth X 1m breadth) covering a distance of 105 meters was constructed in Wadi Hassan to bring water from the valley to Hussein main channel for irrigation for villager’s lands by floods and torrents water. [5 Pages]
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Addressing Gender-Based Sexual Harassment in the Workplace in Vietnam and Cambodia

Purpose: This final evaluation aims to build an impact assessment of the sexual harassment prevention (SHP) package in the targeted suppliers of Primark in Vietnam. In particular, the final evaluation aims to assess the appropriateness and the effectiveness of interventions of the SHP package and review the possibility and lesson learnt to scale up the SHP intervention to other suppliers of Primark in Vietnam.

Methods: The study employed a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods. Regarding qualitative methods, the study organised and collected information from 2 focus group discussions (FGD) with the Sexual Harassment Committee (SHPC) members, 6 in-depth-Interview with leaders and workers, the four most significant change stories and a program reflection workshop. The quantitative method was a survey with a sample of 196 employees working in the targeted factories. [76 pages]

Main findings: The intervention package of the project had 3 major domains of activities which included training and advocacy to leaders and managers of the factories participating in the project on SHP, supporting the factories to develop and implement SHP mechanisms, and awareness-raising and behaviour change campaigns. The project’s activities that focus on training and advocacy for the targeted factories’ leaders and managers had promoted them to proactively participate in address sexual harassment in their factories. The factory management board had publicly shown their commitment to implement the established SH prevention policies and actively participating in implementing all the project activities and creating role models at the forefront of good practice performance. Also, the findings of this evaluation show significant improvements in behaviours and the capacities of SHPC members and resource persons regarding implementing SHP activities and SH case handling. Read More...

Gendered Violence Research Network: Enhancing Women’s Voice to STOP Sexual Harassment Final Evaluation – Vietnam

CARE Australia, through its partner CARE Country Offices (COs), has been working to prevent and address the issue of sexual harassment in mainland Southeast Asia’s garment sector since 2017. STOP is funded by CARE Australia and the Australian Government through the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s Australian NGO Cooperation Program (ANCP) and the Gender Action Platform (GAP).

STOP is aligned with CARE International’s organisational remit of working in gender transformative ways to cultivate gender equality and justice and uses an adapted version of the World Health Organisation’s ‘socio-ecological model of violence prevention.

STOP’s key objectives can be summarised as follows:
1. To support garment factories in developing effective workplace mechanisms to respond to sexual harassment.
2. To make female garment factory workers feel safe enough to report sexual harassment, and through engagement with garment factories, enable them to do so without negative consequences.
3. To strengthen the national regulatory environment to promote laws, policies and mechanisms to address sexual harassment in the workplace. STOP works with participating factories to implement STOP’s Workplace Sexual Harassment Prevention Package (WSHPP) to create workplaces where female workers feel safe and experience less sexual harassment. This is achieved using a ‘social norms approach’ at the individual, factory, and societal levels. [32 pages] Read More...

Integrated Humanitarian Assistance Program (IHAP) South and East Darfur

WASH, Health and Nutrition project is supporting the most vulnerable populations in South and East Darfur States. The project aims to provide lifesaving and integrated WASH, Health and Nutrition Services to 443,190 individuals 332,764 individuals in South (including 253,191 IDPs and 79,573 host community members) and 110,426 individuals in East Darfur (including 10,000 IDPs and 100,426 host community members). CARE target IDPs and host communities in both South and East Darfur states by increasing access to safe water supply, sanitation facilities and hygiene supplies, improving access to basic curative and preventive primary health care, and increased access to nutrition assistance for affected children under 5 and pregnant and lactating women (PLW). Integrating WASH, Health, and Nutrition activities the project will contribute to saving lives by reducing wasting and stunting levels caused by Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM) and Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM).

In October 2020, CARE International Vibes Consultancy Services to conduct an end-line evaluation of the project implemented during the period 2019 to 2020 in two States (South and East Darfur) The evaluation is expected to contribute to strengthening accountability of CARE International for its donors and key stakeholders (including beneficiaries), and to learn from this experience to inform future WASH, Health and Nutrition projects. Key evaluation questions have been special focus on project relevancy, efficiency, effectiveness and impact of the project. This report therefore documents key findings of the evaluation as well as lessons learnt and recommendations useful in guiding the implementation of future projects. [44 Pages] Read More...

COVID-19: Impacts, Attitudes, and Safety Nets in Haiti (April 2021)

In April 2021, CARE conducted interviews with savings group members and leaders to understand their experiences of COVID-19, and how it was changing their lives. The survey included 364 women and 175 men, for a total of 539 respondents. This follows a survey done in June 2020 to understand what was happening at that time for members of savings groups. The surveys covered Artibonite and Grand Anse.

COVID-19 continues to have important impacts for women and men in savings groups. In general, men and women in these groups were reporting similar challenges across the sample. 86% of women and men are reporting impacts in their livelihoods, and 98% of people say that COVID-19 is affecting their ability to save. 64% say they can’t meet family needs and hunger has gone up. 90% of people are reporting that COVID-19 is impacting their social lives. More women than men report that Gender Based Violence has gone up. While women are more likely to have lost influence in the household than men (39% compared to 33%), men are more likely to report that they lost social status in the community (48% compared to 43%). Read More...

CARE Rapid Gender Analysis Um Rakuba Camp and Tunaydbah Settlement, Eastern Sudan April 2021

Since 9 November 2020, Ethiopian and Eritrean asylum seekers have been arriving in Eastern Sudan, fleeing a military escalation in the Tigray region in northern Ethiopia. Eastern Sudan is facing multiple challenges including high levels of food insecurity, flood recovery, increased militarisation on the Sudan and Ethiopia border, as well as the COVID-19 pandemic and the impacts of mitigation and containment measures. As of 17th April (latest situation report), the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the Government’s Commissioner for Refugees (COR) registered 62,850 individuals who have crossed the border into Eastern Sudan. It is estimated that 36% of the arrivals are female and 64% are male. Further estimations show that 27% of the arrivals are children (0-17years); out of which 8% are below 5 years. Elderly (+60years) comprise 4% and Adults (18-59 years) 69% of the arrivals. Of those who arrived, data as of January 2021, showed 15,056 are women and girls of reproductive age and 1,365 currently pregnant women. Primary data collection, through FGDs, KIIs and Individual Stories, took place between 16-18th February 2021, in Um Rakuba camp and Tunaydbah settlement.

RGA objectives were to:
• Better understand, the main needs, priorities and coping strategies of women, men, girls and boys,
as well as at-risk groups in Um Rakuba camp and Tunaydbah settlement
• Identify how CARE and the wider humanitarian community can adapt and design targeted services
and assistance to meet these needs, ensuring we do no harm. Read More...

CARESOM RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS AUGUST 2021

This RGA aimed to gather gender-related information especially gender roles, responsibilities, barriers, misconceptions, social norms, policies, and support systems available for survivors of Gender-Based Violence. The analysis covers five geographical areas within Somalia (Somaliland, Puntland, Galmudug, South West and Banadir) comprising 10 regions and 20 districts. This analysis employed both a qualitative and quantitative assessment using desk reviews, household questionnaires, Focus Group Discussions(FGDs), key informant interviews (KIIs), and individual stories. In total, 2,437 households were interviewed (72.5% female and 27.5% male) while 51 FGDs and 26 KIIs were conducted. The assessment was conducted within CARE Somalia Program areas and households were randomly selected while FGDs and KIIs participants were purposively selected based on gender, age, availability, location and knowledge of topics under investigation. Data was collected by 36 enumerators (16 females and 20 males) using KOBO Collect and analysed using SPSS, PowerBI and Excel. The findings have been presented using graphs, tables, maps, descriptive and inferential statistics. Below are the key findings and recommendations from the assessment. [50 Pages] Read More...

Final Evaluation Report: Gender-sensitive WASH, Nutrition and Health Support to vulnerable communities in South and East Darfur

CARE has been implementing the WASH ,Health and Nutrition project from which aims to provide lifesaving and integrated WASH, Health and Nutrition Services to 174,504 individuals (87,077 males and 87,427 females) in East Darfur and South Darfur through the GAC-funded 2019-2021 project (“the GAC project”).The program aimed to benefit refugees in camp and out of camp settings, out of camp IDPs and host communities by increasing access to safe water supply, sanitation facilities and hygiene supplies, improving access to basic curative and preventive primary health care, and increased access to nutrition assistance for children under five and pregnant and lactating women (PLWs). End line evaluation was conducted for the ended project.

Water: from the survey result it shows that 85.8% responded that their primary source of water is safe throughout the year, compared to the baseline survey which shows that 66% of the respondents still use unsafe drinking water sources.

Sanitary practices: 73.9% of survey participants indicated that they use family toilets for defecation, where in the base line survey show that 34% of the respondents having access to adequate sanitation.

Practice Of Hand Washing: 60.9 % of interviewees (Female: 61.0%, Male: 60.8%) know three critical moments, where in base line survey 65% of the respondents being able to mention at least 3 critical times to perform hand washing.

WASH satisfaction: The end line survey for HHs reported that with WASH regarding relevance, timely and accountability, (75.3%)- (70.6% f,77.9%m) reported that it was relevant

Nutrition: 72.9%% of respondents were satisfied with the nutrition assistance provided.
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COVID-19 Vaccination Uptake: A study of Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Marginalized Communities in Iraq

CARE Iraq conducted a study to better understand community acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination and existing barriers to vaccine uptake. The objectives of the study were to create an understanding of people’s knowledge, attitudes and perceptions about COVID-19 and the vaccines, establish what reasons undermine the COVID-19 vaccination campaign and inform about the status of vaccine uptake among marginalized communities. The results of the study can inform policy makers and health actors to design awareness campaigns and address barriers to vaccine uptake to increase the vaccination rate.

CARE found that:
• Vaccine hesitancy is high.
• Women have less access to, knowledge of, and willingness to accept the COVID-19 vaccine then men.
• Barriers to access are still high, and higher for women than for men.
• Fear of side effects is the biggest obstacle.
• There is little trust in the vaccination process.
• Many people do not believe vaccines are important.
• People are not confident they have enough accurate information.

Key recommendations
• Social media can be a primary channel for vaccine messaging.
• It’s critical to counteract misinformation.
• Multiple sources of information are critical.
• Focus messaging for women and religious leaders.
• Develop different messages in different areas.
• Build on people’s willingness to be convinced with good information. Read More...

Community Scorecard for COVID-19 Vaccines in Malawi

The significant amount of misinformation surrounding COVID-19 has deteriorated trust in governments and health systems, leading the World Health Organization to claim it as an “infodemic.” As the massive vaccine roll-out efforts launch, systematic trust-building and social accountability approaches are vital to ensure that civil society can hold governments accountable for equitable and people-centered vaccine roll-out that reaches the last mile. CARE knows that epidemics, like COVID-19 and Ebola, start and end with communities, which is why we are working to build meaningful citizen engagement into national vaccine roll-out frameworks to increase trust, accountability, and information dissemination.
CARE’s Community Score Card
The Community Score Card (CSC) was developed by CARE Malawi in 2002 and has been effectively used in a wide range of settings and sectors to ensure that public services are accountable to the people and communities they serve. CSC has demonstrated impact on power-shifting and improving service quality and trust building within and between communities and government actors. When COVID-19 arrived in Malawi during March 2020, CARE adapted CSC for remote use. The remote CSC includes an SMS platform and WhatsApp groups through which groups of men, women, youth, community and religious leaders, and service providers could voice their concerns and hesitancies about the vaccine and other health services. The CSC helped to identify major concerns around the vaccine and aided stakeholders in creating locally-driven solutions to combat vaccine hesitancy and misinformation.
Building on these early experiences, from May to June 2021, CARE further implemented a pilot project designed to support efficient and equitable COVID-19 vaccine roll-out in three locations in Malawi: Kandeu and Chigodi health facility catchment populations in Ntcheu district and the New Hope Clinic health facility catchment population in Ngolowindo in Salima district. In all three locations, key stakeholders included groups of women, men, youth, community leaders (chiefs and religious), district health management teams, and health personnel (including health surveillance staff, health facility staff in-charge, and the health center management committee). CARE Malawi’s CSC team led the implementation of the pilot with support from CARE USA and digital support from Kwantu. Read More...

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